Rites of the Catholic Church


#1

I posted this before in a now closed thread but if anyone wants it for reference here it is again:

Re: Listing of Rites in the Catholic Church

ANTIOCHIAN
The Church of Antioch in Syria (on the Mediterranean coast) is considered an apostolic see by virtue of having been founded by St. Peter. It was one of the ancient centers of the Church, as the New Testament attests, and is the source of a family of similar Rites using the ancient Syriac language (the Semitic dialect used in Jesus’ time and better known as Aramaic). Its Liturgy is attributed to St. James and the Church of Jerusalem.

  1. WEST SYRIAN
    • Maronite - Never separated from Rome. Maronite Patriarch of Antioch. The liturgical language* is Aramaic. The 3 million Maronites are found in Lebanon (origin), Cyprus, Egypt, Syria, Israel, Canada, US, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Australia.

• Syriac - Syrian Catholics who returned to Rome in 1781 from the monophysite heresy. Syriac Patriarch of Antioch. The 110,000 Syrian Catholics are found in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Egypt, Canada and the US.

• Malankarese - Catholics from the South of India evangelized by St. Thomas, uses the West Syriac liturgy. Reunited with Rome in 1930. Liturgical languages today are West Syriac and Malayalam. The 350,000 Malankarese Catholics are found in India and North America.

  1. EAST SYRIAN
    • Chaldean - Babylonian Catholics returned to Rome in 1692 from the Nestorian heresy. Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans. Liturgical languages are Syriac and Arabic. The 310,000 Chaldean Catholics are found in Iraq, Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Turkey and the US.

• Syro-Malabarese - Catholics from Southern India using the East Syriac liturgy. Returned to Rome in the 16th century from the Nestorian heresy. Liturgical languages are Syriac and Malayalam. Over 3 million Syro-Malabarese Catholics can be found in the state of Kerela, in SW India.
*
BYZANTINE
The Church of Constantinople became the political and religious center of the eastern Roman Empire after the Emperor Constantine built a new capital there (324-330) on the site of the ancient town of Byzantium. Constantinople developed its own liturgical rite from the Liturgy of St. James, in one form as modified by St. Basil, and in a more commonly used form, as modified by St. John Chrysostom. After 1054, except for brief periods of reunion, most Byzantine Christians have not been in communion with Rome. They make up the Orthodox Churches of the East, whose titular head is the Patriarch of Constantinople. The Orthodox Churches are mostly auto-cephalous, meaning self-headed, united to each other by communion with Constantinople, which exercises no real authority over them. They are typically divided into Churches along nation lines. Those that have returned to communion with the Holy See are represented among the Eastern Churches and Rites of the Catholic Church.

  1. ARMENIAN
    Considered either its own Rite or an older version of the Byzantine. Its exact form is not used by any other Byzantine Rite. It is composed of Catholics from the first people to convert as a nation, the Armenians (N.E. of* Turkey), and who returned to Rome at the time of the Crusades. Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians. The liturgical language is classical Armenian. The 350,000 Armenian Catholics are found in Armenia, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey, Egypt, Greece, Ukraine, France, Romania, United States and Argentina. Most Armenians are Orthodox, not in union with Rome.

  2. BYZANTINE
    • Albanian - Albanian Christians, numbering only 1400 today, who resumed communion with Rome in 1628. Liturgical language is Albanian. Most Albanian Christians are Albanian Orthodox.

• Belarussian/Byelorussian - Unknown number of Belarussians who returned to Rome in the 17th century. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic. The faithful can be found in Belarus, as well as Europe, the Americas and Australia.

• Bulgarian - Bulgarians who returned to Rome in 1861. Liturgical language is Old Slavonic. The 20,000 faithful can be found in Bulgaria. Most Bulgarian Christians are Bulgarian Orthodox.

• Czech - Czech Catholics of Byzantine Rite organized into a jurisdiction in 1996.

• Krizevci - Croatian Catholics of Byzantine Rite who resumed communion with Rome in 1611. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic.* The 50,000 faithful can be found in Croatia and the Americas. Most Croatians are Roman (Rite) Catholics.

(cont’d)


#2

• Greek - Greek Christians who returned to Rome in 1829. The liturgical language is Greek. Only 2500 faithful in Greece, Asia Minor (Turkey) and Europe. Greek Christians are almost all Orthodox, whose Patriarch is the Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople.

• Hungarian - Descendants of Ruthenians who returned to Rome in 1646. The liturgical languages are Greek, Hungarian and English. The 300,000 faithful are found in Hungary, Europe and the Americas.

• Italo-Albanian - Never separated from Rome, these 60,000 Byzantine Rite Catholics are found in Italy, Sicily and the Americas. The liturgical languages are Greek and Italo-Albanian.

• Melkite - Catholics from among those separated from Rome in Syria and Egypt who resumed Communion with Rome at the time of the Crusades. However, definitive union only came in the 18th century. Melkite Greek Patriarch of Damascus. Liturgical languages are Greek, Arabic, English, Portuguese and Spanish. The over 1 million Melkite Catholics can be found in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Canada, US, Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina and Australia.

• Romanian - Romanians who returned to Rome in 1697. The liturgical language is Romanian. There are over 1 million Romanian Catholics in Romania, Europe and the Americas. Most Romanian Christians are Romanian Orthodox.

• Russian - Russians who returned to communion with Rome in 1905. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic. An unknown number of the faithful in Russia, China, the Americas and Australia. Most Russian Christians are Russian Orthodox, whose Patriarch is the Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow.

• Ruthenian - Catholics from among those separated from Rome in Russia, Hungary and Croatia who reunited with Rome in 1596 (Brest-Litovsk) and 1646 (Uzhorod).

• Slovak - Byzantine Rite Catholics of Slovakian origin numbering 225,000 and found in Slovakia and Canada.

• Ukrainian - Catholics from among those separated from Rome by the Greek Schism and reunited about 1595. Patriarch or Metropolitan of Lviv. Liturgical languages are Old Slavonic and the vernacular. The 5.5 million Ukrainian Catholics can be found in Ukraine, Poland, England, Germany, France, Canada, US, Brazil, Argentina and Australia. During the Soviet era Ukrainian Catholics were violently forced to join the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Their hierarchy, which continued to exist outside the homeland, has since been re-established in Ukraine.

ALEXANDRIAN
The Church of Alexandria in Egypt was one of the original centers of Christianity, since like Rome and Antioch it had a large Jewish population which was the initial object of apostolic evangelization. Its Liturgy is attributed to St. Mark the Evangelist, and shows the later influence of the Byzantine Liturgy, in addition to its unique elements.

• Coptic - Egyptian Catholics who returned to communion with Rome in 1741. The Patriarch of Alexandria leads the 200,000 faithful of this ritual Church spread throughout Egypt and the Near East.* The liturgical languages are Coptic (Egyptian) and Arabic. Most Copts are not Catholics.

• Ethiopian/Abyssinian - Ethiopian Coptic Christians who returned to Rome in 1846. The liturgical language is Geez. The 200,000 faithful are found in Ethiopia, Eritrea,* Somalia, and Jerusalem.


#3

Re: Description of Rites in the Catholic Church

From St. Michael’s Ukrainian Rite Church webpage:

The Catholic Church was founded by Jesus Christ nearly two thousand years ago through His apostles and disciples. The Church consists of the faithful united though the Holy Spirit by faith, the seven sacraments, and leadership. The visible head of the Catholic Church is the Pope of Rome who is the successor to St. Peter, the vicar of Christ, and universal teacher of religious truth.

The early Church originated in the Middle East and spread throughout the world. As the Church spread, it encountered a variety of cultures. The coupling of Christianity with these cultures resulted in different forms of worship and expressions of faith. While the forms of worship, or rites varied from region to region, the fundamental truths of Catholicism remained the same.
The early Church established local churches in the major centers of the Roman Empire: Jerusalem, Antioch, Alexandria, Rome, and Constantinople. When the Roman Empire was divided into East and West in 395 AD, the local churches became closely related to the structure of the state. Political divisions became models for ecclesiastical division, and the tendency was for each political division to have its own local church. This can be seen in how the Catholic Church is structured today. It consists of Western Rites and Eastern Rites. The Western Rites consist of those ancient traditions whose center was Rome. The Eastern Rites consist of the Christian communities whose centers were Constantinople, Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandra.
The various Rites vary from one another with regards to their Eucharistic Liturgies, fasting regulations, celebration of holy days, art, architecture, etc. Each Rite is autonomous in that each has its own canons, ecclesiastical discipline, and spiritual hierarchy. However, each Rite maintains the Sacraments (Mysteries), the fundamental teachings of the Church (the Incarnation, Resurrection, the Blessed Trinity, …) and stresses the common Apostolic Tradition. All Rites within the Catholic Church are of equal dignity. Differences in forms of worship do not compromise the essential unity of the Church. Catholics of various Rites are encouraged to worship in each other’s Churches, including receiving the Sacramental Mysteries of Reconciliation (Penance) and the Holy Eucharist.


RITES (From EWTN)
A Rite represents an ecclesiastical, or church, tradition about how the sacraments are to be celebrated. Each of the sacraments has at its core an essential nature which must be satisfied for the sacrament to be confected or realized. This essence - of matter, form and intention - derives from the divinely revealed nature of the particular sacrament. It cannot be changed by the Church. Scripture and Sacred Tradition, as interpreted by the Magisterium, tells us what is essential in each of the sacraments (2 Thes. 2:15).*

When the apostles brought the Gospel to the major cultural centers of their day the essential elements of religious practice were inculturated into those cultures. This means that the essential elements were clothed in the symbols and trappings of the particular people, so that the rituals conveyed the desired spiritual meaning to that culture. In this way the Church becomes all things to all men that some might be saved (1 Cor. 9:22).

There are three major groupings of Rites based on this initial transmission of the faith, the Roman, the Antiochian (Syria) and the Alexandrian (Egypt). Later on the Byzantine derived as a major Rite from the Antiochian, under the influence of St. Basil and St. John Chrysostom. From these four derive the over 20 liturgical Rites present in the Church today.

Eastern Rites and Churches
They have their own hierarchy distinct from the Latin Rite, system of governance (synods) and general law, the Code of Canons for the Eastern Churches. The Supreme Pontiff exercises his primacy over them through the Congregation for the Eastern Churches.


#4

Hagia,

There are a number of errors in this text:

The EWTN piece provides a distorted and less than complete definition of what a Rite is, besides referring to “more than 20 rites”, confusing the concepts of Rite and Church.

The other listing of Rites and the Churches which use each lists for the Byzantines:

Czech Catholic Church - there is no such sui iuris Church. The Czech jurisdiction is Ruthenian in its ecclesiastical heritage.

Kriveci Catholic Church - the correct name is Croatian Catholic Church. Kriveci is the name of the jurisdiction.

It fails to list the Georgian Catholic Church which, although close to extinction, is not yet.

The Antiochian Rite listing includes the Maronites among the West Syrian Tradition of the Rite. Although they have their origins there, the Maronites have been long deemed to consitute a Rite unto themselves.

It also lists the Chaldeans among the East Syrian Tradition of that same Rite. The Chaldeans, given their origins in the Assyrian Church of the East with its unique liturgical expression as evidenced in the Anaphora of Mar Addai and Mari is now described as a Rite unto itself in a number of places, including either the Code of Canon Law or the Catechism or both.

For a better description of these topics, I highly suggest that folks look to the CNEWA site, to Deacon Ed’s recent posting, or to any of several other posts made on this subject.

Many years,

Neil


#5

[quote=Irish Melkite]Hagia,

There are a number of errors in this text:

The EWTN piece provides a distorted and less than complete definition of what a Rite is, besides referring to “more than 20 rites”, confusing the concepts of Rite and Church.

The other listing of Rites and the Churches which use each lists for the Byzantines:

Czech Catholic Church - there is no such sui iuris Church. The Czech jurisdiction is Ruthenian in its ecclesiastical heritage.

Kriveci Catholic Church - the correct name is Croatian Catholic Church. Kriveci is the name of the jurisdiction.

It fails to list the Georgian Catholic Church which, although close to extinction, is not yet.

The Antiochian Rite listing includes the Maronites among the West Syrian Tradition of the Rite. Although they have their origins there, the Maronites have been long deemed to consitute a Rite unto themselves.

It also lists the Chaldeans among the East Syrian Tradition of that same Rite. The Chaldeans, given their origins in the Assyrian Church of the East with its unique liturgical expression as evidenced in the Anaphora of Mar Addai and Mari is now described as a Rite unto itself in a number of places, including either the Code of Canon Law or the Catechism or both.

For a better description of these topics, I highly suggest that folks look to the CNEWA site, to Deacon Ed’s recent posting, or to any of several other posts made on this subject.

Many years,

Neil
[/quote]

First of all, very glad to see you once again in here - you’ve been missed. Don’t stay away so long.

Can you separate out clearly for us the difference between a “rite” and a “church”? (I’m afraid I use the terms somewhat interchangeably".

Thank you for the corrections - I had the sense that it was not “the final word” but is was the most comprehensive I could find. I wish the Vatican page listed all of them - (sigh).

If you’ve got a web site which does, I’d appreciate your posting a url - thanks. :wink:


#6

The term “Rite” refers to a particular way in which things are done. The term “Church” refers to a *sui iuris *body of believers who participate in a common form of worship.

The Byzantine Rite, for example, is shared by 14 different Churches.

In the past the Roman Catholic Church did refer to each of the Eastern Catholic Churches with the term “rite” but this changed with Vatican II.

Deacon Ed


#7

First of all, very glad to see you once again in here - you’ve been missed. Don’t stay away so long.

Hagia,

First, thanks for the kind words. I’ve been a bit busy and the sheer size of this forum dictates that you come regularly or don’t even try to play catch-up.

As to your question about a web-site. I’m working on it. One of these days soon - hopefully.

To elaborate a bit on my brother, Deacon Ed’s post - for many centuries, Eastern Catholics were referred to by their Western brothers and sisters as “Eastern Rite Catholics”. One who was a member of a particular religious group within Eastern or Oriental Catholicity was spoken of as being of the ____ (e.g., Melkite, Ruthenian, Ukrainian) Rite. Several years ago, Rome finally recognized that what had been termed “Rites” were actually separate Churches, which together with the Latin Church, constitute the Catholic Communion or Church.

Thus, the Catholic Church is comprised of 23 self-governing Churches, also referred to as Churches sui iuris (“Churches of their own law” or “Particular Churches” or “Autonomous Ritual Churches”).

Correct usage of the term “Rite” is important, more so in the Eastern Churches than in the Latin Church (although there are other Rites within the Roman Church, the Latin Rite vastly predominates in the West - the others are used only in very limited areas or under very particular circumstances).

Each Church sui iuris worships according to a particular Rite. A simple definition of a Rite is that it is the collected form of ritual, ceremony, and prayers according to which the members of a Church conduct their worship and other liturgical services; for the most part, Rites reflect the cultures in which they were developed.

In the West, there are multiple Rites used within a single Church. In the East, only a single Rite is used by any one Church, but in some instances more than one Church uses the same Rite.

Western Catholics use the Latin Rite (with a few exceptions, as I noted above). Eastern and Oriental Catholic Rites developed from the customs and style of worship practiced in what were the 3 most important centers of Christian development, other than Rome (i.e., Alexandria, Antioch, and Byzantium [later called Constantinople, and now Istanbul]). This happened at a time when achieving uniformity of liturgical practice was hampered by the limitations that resulted from geography and the difficulties of communication.

Initially, there were three Rites used by Eastern and Oriental Catholics: the Alexandrean, Antiochene, and Byzantine Rites. Eventually, as those Rites were carried back to other cities, modifications occurred. Three of the variations that arose developed in very isolated areas and, as a result, changed to such an extent that they came to be considered Rites unto themselves; those are the Armenian, Assyrian or Chaldean, and Maronite Rites.

In other instances, the changes which occurred in the Rites were less drastic and didn’t merit being designated as a separate rite; such localized variations came to be termed Traditions. Thus, the Antiochene Rite is further divided into the East and West Syrian Traditions. The Alexandrean Rite is comprised of the Coptic and Ge’ez Traditions. The Byzantine Rite, largest of the several, has Byzantine-Greek and Byzantine-Slav Traditions.

The Maronite, Chaldean, and Armenian Rites are each utilized only by a single Church sui iuris, so that, within those, there is no further breakdown by tradition.

(continued)


#8

The Byzantine-Greek and Byzantine-Slav Traditions are each used by several Churches, with further local variations due to the ethno-cultural differences among the faithful of those Churches. Such variations are termed Recensions - thus, for example, there are Ruthenian and Great Russian Recensions (as well as others) within the Byzantine-Slav Tradition and Grieco and Greico-Arabic (Melkite) Recensions (and others as well) within the Byzantine-Greek Tradition.

There is another breakdown, termed a Usage . It hasn’t really been applied to the Eastern Rites until now (in the Latin Church, it is applied to “the Anglican Usage”, which is the ritual forms and prayers permitted to be employed by certain congregations of faithful in the US who returned to communion with Rome from the Anglican or Episcopalian Church). However, there are a couple of historical instances in the Eastern and Oriental Churches where it could probably be applied pretty aptly and another of recent vintage to which it might have application.

Within the Syro-Malabarese Catholic Church, there is a distinct group referred to as “Southists” or “Knanaites”. They are an endogenous community who are descendents of 72 Jewish Christian families who emigrated to Kerala on the Malabar coast of India in 352 AD, under the leadership of Knai Thomman (Thomas the Canaanite). Early in the 20th century, the Holy See granted the request of the Knanaites that a canonical jurisdiction be erected for them at Kottayam solely on the basis of their ethno-cultural identity. They have their own hierarch and clergy, subject to the presiding hierarch of the Syro-Malabarese Catholic Church, of which they are a constituent entity, although they retain certain liturgical practices unique to themselves. This is really a Usage and probably would have been termed such, except that there was no such terminology being employed back at the time they came into being. I suspect the term will ultimately be applied to them.

About a year ago, the election of a new Patriarch for the Chaldean Catholic Church brought to light two very distinct factions within that Church’s Synod of Bishops. They are commonly referred to as the “Syriac (or Aramaic)” and the “Arabic” parties. The former are dedicated to the Church’s traditional liturgical forms; the latter is inclined to the “arabization” of the Church, critical to its efforts at prosletyizing, but feared both because it could diminish the Church’s mission to its traditional base of Chaldean faithful and because it could damage the very fruitful dialogue and excellent relations between the Chaldeans and their counterparts of the Assyrian Churches. It is very possible that, ultimately, these will become 2 distinct Usages within the Chaldean Church.

A while ago, I posted a break-out of Rites, Traditions, Rescensions, Churches, Usages. Unfortunately, it doesn’t copy and paste well, losing the formatting and the nesting format becomes a nusciance to recreate. If I can locate it, I’ll post the link here. It’s probably the clearest that I’ve ever managed to concoct.

Many years,

Neil


#9

A while ago, I posted a break-out of Rites, Traditions, Rescensions, Churches, Usages. Unfortunately, it doesn’t copy and paste well, losing the formatting and the nesting format becomes a nusciance to recreate. If I can locate it, I’ll post the link here. It’s probably the clearest that I’ve ever managed to concoct.

Ok - the break-out is on a thread titled RCC? Correct Term?. It begins at post #28 of that thread and continues for several posts thereafter.

Except that there is one “whoops” there :o . Just glancing at it, I realize that I left the Chaldean Rite and Church off the schematic. although I included them in the text. Duh … and nobody called me on it :frowning: .

Many years,

Neil


#10

I have tried unsuccessfully for an hour now to post this as a new topic - in News, but the system is timing out on uploading, so am going to try doing it this way, although it’s too bad as it should be seen by folks.

From the Vatican press releases this morning, courtesy of David Cheney, webmaster of Catholic Hierarchy.

Il Santo Padre ha elevato la Chiesa Metropolitana sui iuris Siro-Malankarese al grado di Chiesa Arcivescovile Maggiore ed ha promosso l’Ecc.mo Cyril Mar Baselios Malancharuvil, O.I.C., alla dignità di Arcivescovo Maggiore di Trivandrum dei Siro-Malankaresi.

S.E. Mons. Cyril Mar Baselios Malancharuvil, O.I.C.

È nato a Ullannor, Pandalam, nell’Arcieparchia metropolitana di Trivandrum, il 16 agosto 1935. Nel 1951 è entrato nell’Ordine dell’Imitazione di Cristo. Ha compiuto gli studi ecclesiastici superiori al Pontificio Ateneo di Poona, ove ha ottenuto la licenza in Filosofia e Teologia. È stato ordinato sacerdote a Poona il 4 ottobre 1960. Nel 1961 è stato inviato a Roma ove si è laureato in Diritto Canonico presso la Pontificia Università Gregoriana. Ritornato in Patria, è stato professore di Teologia nel Seminario Regionale di S. Tommaso di Kottayam e nel Pontificio Seminario Interrituale di Alwaye. Nel 1970 si è recato brevemente negli Stati Uniti, ove ha conseguito il “Master’s Degree” in Psicologia all’Università di St. John di New York. È stato Consultore della Pontificia Commissione per la Revisione del Codice di Diritto Canonico Orientale. Il 24 aprile 1974 è stato eletto Superiore Generale dell’Ordine dell’Imitazione di Cristo. Il 28 ottobre 1978 è stato eletto primo Vescovo di Battery dei Siro-Malankaresi ed è stato ordinato il 28 dicembre dello stesso anno. Il 6 novembre 1995 è stato nominato Arcivescovo Metropolita di Trivandrum dei Siro-Malankaresi.

Translation of the opening paragraph:

The Holy Father has elevated the Syro-Malankarese Metropolitan Church sui iuris to the status of a Major Arch-Episcopal Church and has raised His Excellency Cyril Mar Basilios Malancharuvil, O.I.C., to the dignity of Major-Archbishop of Trivandrum of the Syro-Malankarese.

Axios! Axios! Axios!

Eis polla aeti, Despota

May God grant many years to His Excellency the Major-Archbishop Cyril Mar Basilios and congratulations to our brothers and sisters of the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church sui iuris.

This action means that there are now 3 Churches sui iuris of Major-Archepiscopal rank: the Ukrainians; the Syro-Malabarese; and the Syro-Malankarese.

Many years,

Neil


#11

[quote=HagiaSophia] I wish the Vatican page listed all of them - (sigh).

If you’ve got a web site which does, I’d appreciate your posting a url - thanks. :wink:
[/quote]

Have you seen this web page of CNEWA (Catholic Near East Welfare Association - a papal agency for humanitarian and pastoral support)?

Catholic Eastern Churches

Click on the boxes along the right side of the page under “Catholic Eastern Churches” for a brief description of each local particular church.


#12

bump


#13

[quote=Matt16_18]Have you seen this web page of CNEWA (Catholic Near East Welfare Association - a papal agency for humanitarian and pastoral support)?

Catholic Eastern Churches

Click on the boxes along the right side of the page under “Catholic Eastern Churches” for a brief description of each local particular church.
[/quote]

Thank so much!


#14

[quote=Irish Melkite]I have tried unsuccessfully for an hour now to post this as a new topic - in News, but the system is timing out on uploading, so am going to try doing it this way, although it’s too bad as it should be seen by folks.

From the Vatican press releases this morning, courtesy of David Cheney, webmaster of Catholic Hierarchy.

Translation of the opening paragraph:

The Holy Father has elevated the Syro-Malankarese Metropolitan Church sui iuris to the status of a Major Arch-Episcopal Church and has raised His Excellency Cyril Mar Basilios Malancharuvil, O.I.C., to the dignity of Major-Archbishop of Trivandrum of the Syro-Malankarese.

Axios! Axios! Axios!

Eis polla aeti, Despota

May God grant many years to His Excellency the Major-Archbishop Cyril Mar Basilios and congratulations to our brothers and sisters of the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church sui iuris.

This action means that there are now 3 Churches sui iuris of Major-Archepiscopal rank: the Ukrainians; the Syro-Malabarese; and the Syro-Malankarese.

Many years,

Neil
[/quote]

Thanks so much for the update and BTW - perhaps in the interest of clarifying things for those who “don’t quite get it” can you find a brief explanation of sui iuris churches

That way perhaps we can have a thread which covers all the rites and the sui iuris and the meaning of rites vs. churches around for future reference for all of us. It doeth get complex for those just strting out to look into these things.


#15

Thank you all for this information. Since I was a child and learned of the loss of Constantinople and the Eastern Christian Empire to Islam this has always been an interest (and object of sadness) of mine.

As I understand it, the Eastern Schism was caused by a number of political and questionable theologic positions driven by secular rulers of Byzantium, most notably that of Photius. (New Advent is a great source of information). My knowledge acquisition continues…
I am happy to see there are many of those I thought separated from Rome are in fact reconciled. I was not aware of any of this!

Where may I find more information on the reconcilliation efforts, past and present, between Rome and the Eastern Orthodox? Is there a info at the Vatican web site?

Thank you again!


#16

[quote=HagiaSophia]Thanks so much for the update and BTW - perhaps in the interest of clarifying things for those who “don’t quite get it” can you find a brief explanation of sui iuris churches

That way perhaps we can have a thread which covers all the rites and the sui iuris and the meaning of rites vs. churches around for future reference for all of us. It doeth get complex for those just strting out to look into these things.
[/quote]

You might try the Eastern Catholic Pastoral Association of Southern California which has a brief summary of the various Eastern Catholic Churches along with some of the liturgies that are used in the East.

Deacon Ed


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