Rites of the Church


#1

How many Rites are there in the Church I know of the Latin, Byzantine and Armianian Rites but are their others?


#2

Good question:
Not sure of it’s accuracy but I found this on another website:
cin.org/archives/cinapol/199801/0120.html

There are Nine Major Rites named by the Congregation for Oriental Churches
in the Catholic Church:

Latin (or Roman) Rite (also known as Western)

Eastern Rites are:

Byzantine, Armenian, Chaldian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Malabar, Maronite, and
Syrian.

But inreality it is a little more complicated with sub-divisions of these
rites and also some of the nine rite really being subdivisions themselves.

The Ethiopian and Coptic Rites use a modifed version of the Liturgy of St.
Mark and contain elements of other liturgies as well. These two can also be
collectively called the Alexandrian Rite.

The Maronite and Syrian (along with Malankar) can be collected under the
title of Antiochene and use basically the Liturgy St. James of Jerusalam.

The Armenians use the Greek Liturgy of St. Basil although the language is
Classical Armenian.

The Chaldeans and the Malabar (Syro-Malabar) can be collected under the
title of Chaldian and derived from the Antiochene Rite.

The Byzantine Rite has the largest collection, based on the Liturgy of St.
James and St. Basil include:
Albanian, Belarussian, Bulgarisn, Croatian, Greek, Hungarian,
Italo-ALbanisn, Melkite (Greek Catholic-Melkite), Romanian, Russian,
Rithenian (Carpatho-Russian), Slovak, Ukrainian (Galician Ruthenian).


#3

CHALDEAN, SYRO-MALABARESE, MARONITE, SYRIAC, MALANKARESE, COPTIC, ETHIOPIAN/ABYSSINIAN, ALBANIAN, BELARUSSIAN, BULGARIAN, CZEK, KRIZEVCI, GREEK, HUNGARIAN, ITALO-ALBANIAN, MELKITE, ROMANIAN, RUSSIAN, RUTHENIAN, SLOVAK, UKRAINIAN


#4

So add the main 9 above and we get 27 hmmmm interesting


#5

[quote=starrs0]How many Rites are there in the Church I know of the Latin, Byzantine and Armianian Rites but are their others?
[/quote]

These are the Western Rites

  • Roman (Including the old Tridentine Mass) - Anglican Use - Since the 1980s the Holy See has granted some former Anglican and Episcopal clergy converting with their parishes the faculty of celebrating the sacramental rites according to Anglican forms, doctrinally corrected.
  • Mozarabic Archdiocese of Toledo, Spain * Ambrosian - The Rite of the Archdiocese of Milan, Italy * Bragan - Rite of the Archdiocese of Braga, the Primatial See of Portugal * Dominican - Rite of the Order of Friars Preacher (OP), founded by St. Dominic in 1215.
  • Carmelite - Rite of the Order of Carmel, whose modern foundation was by St. Berthold c.1154.
  • Carthusian - Rite of the Carthusian Order founded by St. Bruno in 1084.

These are the Eastern Rites

Maronite * Syriac * Malankarese * Chaldean * Syro-Malabarese * Armenian and the various regional versions of the Byzantine (Greek Russian Slavic etc, 14 of them in all) and Coptic and Ethiopian/Abyssinian.


#6

Even though there are different Rites, they’re still a part of the CC, correct? I mean, it’s not like Protestant or anything like that matter, right?


#7

[quote=Paris Blues]Even though there are different Rites, they’re still a part of the CC, correct? I mean, it’s not like Protestant or anything like that matter, right?
[/quote]

Yes. They submit to the authority of the Pope and they are doctrinally equivalent. They do have their own bishops and diocesean boundaries. For instance the Byzantines have 4 diocese in the United States. The differences are more cultural and practice.

Blessings


#8

[quote=thessalonian]Yes. They submit to the authority of the Pope and they are doctrinally equivalent. They do have their own bishops and diocesean boundaries. For instance the Byzantines have 4 diocese in the United States. The differences are more cultural and practice.
[/quote]

Rites can’t “submit” to a Pope, they would have to be sentient to do that. :slight_smile:

There are Eastern Churches who are in communion with the Pope of Rome and the Latin Church. Twenty-three sister churches altogether make up the Catholic communion proper (which could be called the Catholic Church).

Ritual (liturgy, sacramental and otherwise) is only a part of the whole of a church. Theology, spirituality, a hierarchy, and liturgy make a Church *and there are palpable and profound differences in each of these between the various churches. * Calling all this simply a “rite” denigrates all the Churches, and reduces our differences to just “funny ways of saying mass” (viewed through a Latin lens). At best the use of the word “Rite” in this way is a historical anachronism, at the worst it is very disrespectful.

It is also largely inaccurate, given that some Churches have their liturgy in common with one another. For example, most churches referred to as “Eastern” are united in their use of the Divine Liturgy of John Chrysostom, but this does not reduce those sister churches into one “Eastern Rite”. No such thing exists!

The development of Christ’s church as a communion of sister churches, Christian eccleisiology, is much more complex than most Christians realize. Immersion is probably the only way to begin to come to an understanding of the depth of the Church as a whole. But is enough to begin by understanding that the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church is made up of many sister churches, of equal dignity.

Please don’t call your sister churches “Rites”. It slaps them in the face…just like calling them “Roman” goes against all their own history, culture, and tradition. Both are no-nos.

For further reading one could do worse than to start here: johnmaron.org/history/occoc.html This article, courtesy of the Apostolic Maronite Church (one of the twentythree!) should be very edifying.

As it is elsewhere written on that site, “It takes many instruments to play a symphony.” johnmaron.org/faq/faq.html

So…if you ever run into somebody who tells you that “The Church” is far too monolithic and uniform, you know to laugh him out of the room. :smiley:


#9

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