Roman Catholics and Evangelicals


#1

Hello all,

I am wondering if any of you out there have read or heard of a book called “Roman Catholics and Evangelicals” by Norman Giesler and Ralph MacKenzie. The book highlights the “agreements” and differences between the afore mentioned groups, but is extremely protestant slanted, for example states “Jesus’ words need not be taken in the literal sense of ingesting his body and blood” in regards to transubstantiation. I was given this book by a good friend of mine who is a non-denom. protestant and was given this book by her pastor as a response to the questions i began to pose. While she has come a long way in her understanding of the faith and it’s biblical base, she still struggles with the authority question. In any case, my question is this

  1. Does there exist a book or any other info that addresses this book directly? Many of the arguments made in this book are easily refuted because of their misunderstanding of catholicism and ignorance of scripture, but it would be interesting to read how others have responded as well.

Thanks
’Gnon

Car c’est a toi qui appartiennent
le regne, la puissance et la gloire,
pour les siecles des siecles.


#2

[quote=Vivre-Avignon]Hello all,

Many of the arguments made in this book are easily refuted because of their misunderstanding of catholicism and ignorance of scripture,

I think your criticism of this book is far too harsh. It certainly is from a “Protestant” interpretation of the Scriptures, but one could hardly judge the author as being ignorant of the Scriptures.
Kinsman
[/quote]


#3

Try “Philosophical and Practical Problems with Sola Scriptura”, by Dr. Philip Blosser.


#4

There is a book called Catholic and Christian by Alan Schreck that does a good job explaining commonly misunderstood Catholic beliefs. This book is good for Catholics and Non- Catholic Christians!


#5

Not by Faith Alone mentions this book fairly frequently. Apparently the authors put forth the novel concept of sanctification by faith alone. They appeal to the letter of St. Paul to the Galatians, the only one of his epistles which doesn’t contain the word sanctification!


#6

<< Does there exist a book or any other info that addresses this book directly? >>

The two Sungenis books Not By Scripture Alone and Not By Faith Alone answer much on those two issues: authority and salvation/justification, citing Geisler/MacKenzie directly.

My article deals with some of the book on the Eucharist

His stuff on the Papacy relies on White’s old book Answers to Catholic Claims (1990), answered by John Chapman and other articles on my site

Rome has spoken, the case is closed
James White Objections Answered
Answer to White on Early Papacy

His stuff on papal infallibility, first published in Christian Research Journal as “What Think Ye of Rome?” was addressed here

CRI Geisler/MacKenzie Part 3 on biblical authority
CRI Geisler/MacKenzie Part 4 on papal infal

Rebuttal to Geisler/MacKenzie Part 3
Rebuttal to Geisler/MacKenzie Part 4

Geisler/MacKenzie claims Salmon has “never been answered”

Here is the answer to Salmon

Overall, Geisler/MacKenzie are quite fair in the first half on the “agreements.”

Phil P


#7

I would highly recommend Karl Keatings “Catholicism and Fundamentalism”.


#8

Just as a side-note, having come from an evangelical protestant background and becoming a Catholic just over a year ago, I have been struck by the similarities in moral teaching.

In an era when the Holy Father has been promoting evangelization, it seems a great shame that believers in Jesus Christ like the evangelicals, should be separated by theological blocks to the fullness of the faith, blocks that were established hundreds of years ago in history by a rebellion and held unquestioned today.
It seems to me that the energy and focus of evangelization that the evangelical churches have could be well utilized in the Catholic church, if only they were able cross over the divide and join us.

Something to continue to pray about.


#9

Pray for Norman Geisler’s conversion. The man has a huge intellect; if we could get him over here with us, he would be a tremendous asset to Catholic apologetics and Catholic intellectualism.

DaveBj


#10

[quote=Vivre-Avignon]Hello all,

I am wondering if any of you out there have read or heard of a book called “Roman Catholics and Evangelicals” by Norman Giesler and Ralph MacKenzie. The book highlights the “agreements” and differences between the afore mentioned groups, but is extremely protestant slanted, for example states “Jesus’ words need not be taken in the literal sense of ingesting his body and blood” in regards to transubstantiation. I was given this book by a good friend of mine who is a non-denom. protestant and was given this book by her pastor as a response to the questions i began to pose. While she has come a long way in her understanding of the faith and it’s biblical base, she still struggles with the authority question. In any case, my question is this

  1. Does there exist a book or any other info that addresses this book directly? Many of the arguments made in this book are easily refuted because of their misunderstanding of catholicism and ignorance of scripture, but it would be interesting to read how others have responded as well.

Thanks
’Gnon

Car c’est a toi qui appartiennent
le regne, la puissance et la gloire,
pour les siecles des siecles.
[/quote]

I have not read the book, but I have to tell you that as a Roman Catholic I have more in common with Protestant Evangelicals than I do with progressive Catholics. At least the former is not trying to “secularize” Christianity as the latter has been trying to do for 40 years now.

Antonio :slight_smile:


#11

[quote=Apologia100]I would highly recommend Karl Keatings “Catholicism and Fundamentalism”.
[/quote]

I second this recommendation. Though some of the chapters deal with anti-Catholic ministries that are not flourishing anymore, the book itself deals with the common objections in a very thorough and thoughtful way. And in a very readable style too.


#12

[quote=cmcruz]I second this recommendation. Though some of the chapters deal with anti-Catholic ministries that are not flourishing anymore, the book itself deals with the common objections in a very thorough and thoughtful way. And in a very readable style too.
[/quote]

What ministries are these that are no longer flourishing? I just got this book recently and have really only skimmed it…

I would also reccomend "Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic’ by David Currie.

dream wanderer


#13

I read Giesler’s book last summer, and by the time I was finished, I was convincened Catholcism bordered on being heresy. Once I really studied Catholicism, I became Catholic. Once I read Catholicism and Fundamentalism, I went back and looked at the bibliography. Giesler’s book has some citations from Loraine Boettener.


#14

i would recommend both shreck’s book ‘christian and catholic’ and keating’s ‘catholicism and fundamentalism’. but i’d be careful with keating’s book. it tends to be extremely antiecumenical. you don’t want to come across to your protestant friends with the tone that keating takes in his book. shreck’s book is much more positive and good for ecumenical dialog. and he’s got a trendy name. :slight_smile:


#15

[quote=dream wanderer]What ministries are these that are no longer flourishing? I just got this book recently and have really only skimmed it…
[/quote]

I should have been more clear. All the ministries that are mentioned in the first half of the book are still active, in various forms (for example, their newsletters may have become blogs and websites). Some have grown in size (i.e. Jimmy Swaggart), while others have become less important to the anti-Catholic movement, having been replaced by new organizations. So the chapters of the book dealing with the ministries are still very useful and worth reading. As a recent convert, I consider myself to have been somewhat anti-Catholic as a “non-denominational” Christian. However, this book really opened my eyes to the extent to which people defame and attack the Church and to the various strategies they employ in doing so.


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