romance novels


#1

Is it a sin to read romance novels? I have a series by LaVyrle Spencer that doesn’t have any violence or negativity, but does have some steamy love scenes.

Please advise.


#2

Only if they are a proximate occasion of sin for you, ie tempt you very much into thing that you shouldn’t do.


#3

Some romance novels are pornos for woman.


#4

[quote=serena]Is it a sin to read romance novels? I have a series by LaVyrle Spencer that doesn’t have any violence or negativity, but does have some steamy love scenes.

Please advise.
[/quote]

Are you reading them becasue you are aroused sexually or becasue you like the story (cause we all know that guys only read the article in “playboy” right;) )


#5

Get thee away from romance novels! :eek: I know from personal experience how terrible these books can be. They really are the Playboy for women. Ask yourself these questions: do you find these scenes at all arousing? Do you ever “think back” or dwell on those scenes after you have read them? Would you be embarrassed if your husband/brother/dad/parish priest read an excerpt? Would you let your daughter read them?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then why continue reading them? St. Augustine sternly cautioned against reading immoral literature, for good reason.

On a positive note, there are some great romance novels written by Christians. They are merely “love stories” minus the steamy love scenes. I highly recommend the trilogy beginning with the book, “The Shunning.” I forget the author, but they are great books. Check out Christianbooks.com for some good reads.


#6

I could not agree more…steer clear of those romance novels. They really** are** pornography for women!

[quote=jc413]Get thee away from romance novels! :eek: I know from personal experience how terrible these books can be. They really are the Playboy for women. Ask yourself these questions: do you find these scenes at all arousing? Do you ever “think back” or dwell on those scenes after you have read them? Would you be embarrassed if your husband/brother/dad/parish priest read an excerpt? Would you let your daughter read them?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then why continue reading them? St. Augustine sternly cautioned against reading immoral literature, for good reason.

On a positive note, there are some great romance novels written by Christians. They are merely “love stories” minus the steamy love scenes. I highly recommend the trilogy beginning with the book, “The Shunning.” I forget the author, but they are great books. Check out Christianbooks.com for some good reads.
[/quote]


#7

The question I ask is why read them when there are much better alternatives? Alternatives which will bring you closer to God.


#8

Women may not be as subject to sexual fantasies as men, but they are more subject to emotional fantasies, and here is the real danger of Romance Novels. They create an image that no husband can live up to (just as pornographic images create a physical image no wife can live up to–and some of you may have very beautiful wives, I know I do, but we all age, etc). This is the reason they are contrary to marital love and charity.
Throw them in the garbage and pick up Sigrid Undset and Rumer Godden–two great Catholic lady writers.

Chris C.


#9

[quote=jc413]Get thee away from romance novels! :eek: I know from personal experience how terrible these books can be. They really are the Playboy for women. Ask yourself these questions: do you find these scenes at all arousing? Do you ever “think back” or dwell on those scenes after you have read them? Would you be embarrassed if your husband/brother/dad/parish priest read an excerpt? Would you let your daughter read them?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then why continue reading them? St. Augustine sternly cautioned against reading immoral literature, for good reason.

On a positive note, there are some great romance novels written by Christians. They are merely “love stories” minus the steamy love scenes. I highly recommend the trilogy beginning with the book, “The Shunning.” I forget the author, but they are great books. Check out Christianbooks.com for some good reads.
[/quote]

That is absolutely right! Also, romance novels are addictive, yes, that’s right, addictive. They are pornographic literature. You may start out by reading less offensive romance novels but you could eventually read anything that you can get your hands on. When you start looking in thrift and used book stores for novels because you read so much that you can’t afford the new book prices, you know you are in serious trouble. It took a great deal of prayer, fasting, and confession for me to break free of them. I have a master’s degree and was very scholarly when I decided to read an occasional romance novel just to give my brain a rest from all the heavy accademic reading I had to do. Well, I got addicted and it nearly ruined my marriage. I would read a book a day and snap at my husband any time he criticized about it. He turned to junk TV because I was never available to talk. I couldn’t stand his TV selections (Jerry Springer and the like) so we ended up in different parts of the house and not communicating. He said he would give up the trash TV if I gave up the romance novels. With God’s help I was able to take up the challenge and have been romance-novel-free for about 15 months now. He is still struggling to stop watching junk TV. My habit led to his habit and we are still reaping the bad harvest.

In short, my advice is avoid romance novels like you would avoid other pornography (or at least I hope you would).


#10

Interesting. There’s a thread about “Pretty Girl” on the apologetics topic which is about men struggling to deflect their gaze at immodestly dressed women.

The topic of the differences between men and women came up, and I pointed out that romance novels are the woman’s form of Playboy. And now I stumble across this thread.

Be mindful of the setting too. Are the “steamy” scenes in adulterous situations?

My wife was telling me how great the “Bridges of Madison County” book was when I responded about how it just glorifies adultery.

Just as any woman would be rightfully upset that after decades of sacrifice, childbirth, mundane work, toil a husband would dump all that as meaningless for something so shallow as skin-deep beauty.

Any husband should be just as upset for a wife to disregard all his sacrifice for some unrealistic fantasy relationship.


#11

Anything by Jeanette Oke is awesome, you get your romance and drama all in one without compromising your christian values, I love her books.


#12

[quote=newsong]Anything by Jeanette Oke is awesome, you get your romance and drama all in one without compromising your christian values, I love her books.
[/quote]

I also like Jeanette Oke and Lori Wick - both write wonderful, christian books that entertain. I do however, get frustrated by the overriding “being saved”, non-Catholic emphasis. Does anyone know of Catholic authors who write in this same vein? While I do read some deep, meaningful books, I enjoy the occassion “fluffy” book for light reading.

Thanks,
Kris


#13

Novels that describe any sexual behavior in detail are not OK. :bigyikes: That is just not necessary or edifying. Unfortunately, most modern fiction seems to be filled with smut and foul language. However, veiled or implied references are acceptable in some instances, I think. Let me explain further.

A novel that implies sinful behavior to tell a story and then shows how that sin affected others, caused problems and destroyed lives while showing how good, moral and virtuous behavior brings contentment, joy, purity is to be commended. It can act as a warning or example to others.

Good novels of this vein that I have read or am familiar with are any of the works by Jane Austen, Jeanette Oke, Elsie Dinsmore series, Anne of Green Gables series, Little House series, Charles Dickens, etc. They depict at times horrible situations and circumstances, but the authors do so in a way that glorifies good and makes an example of the wicked.

Teen girls can benefit greatly from the works of Jane Austen. Most of her works could be classified as romance novels. They can serve as good models for how a young lady should behave in society and in relationships if she wishes to be respected and kept pure. She holds up the virtues of propriety, modesty, industriousness, femininity, honor, duty, honesty, prudence, sobriety, gentleness, kindness, goodness and self-control. Her works make an example of those who are licentious, scoundrels, vain, proud, conceited, immodest, lazy, impetuous, mean-spirited…all with wit and good clean humor!

Does anyone else have any other suggestions?:hmmm:

Happy reading!:thumbsup:


#14

[quote=Little Lamb]Novels that describe any sexual behavior in detail are not OK. :bigyikes: That is just not necessary or edifying. Unfortunately, most modern fiction seems to be filled with smut and foul language. However, veiled or implied references are acceptable in some instances, I think. Let me explain further.

A novel that implies sinful behavior to tell a story and then shows how that sin affected others, caused problems and destroyed lives while showing how good, moral and virtuous behavior brings contentment, joy, purity is to be commended. It can act as a warning or example to others.

Good novels of this vein that I have read or am familiar with are any of the works by Jane Austen, Jeanette Oke, Elsie Dinsmore series, Anne of Green Gables series, Little House series, Charles Dickens, etc. They depict at times horrible situations and circumstances, but the authors do so in a way that glorifies good and makes an example of the wicked.

Teen girls can benefit greatly from the works of Jane Austen. Most of her works could be classified as romance novels. They can serve as good models for how a young lady should behave in society and in relationships if she wishes to be respected and kept pure. She holds up the virtues of propriety, modesty, industriousness, femininity, honor, duty, honesty, prudence, sobriety, gentleness, kindness, goodness and self-control. Her works make an example of those who are licentious, scoundrels, vain, proud, conceited, immodest, lazy, impetuous, mean-spirited…all with wit and good clean humor!

Does anyone else have any other suggestions?:hmmm:

Happy reading!:thumbsup:
[/quote]

I totally agree w/ you. throw out those romantic novels they only cause you to have a false sense of human sexuality and love never mind causing you to entertain impure thoughts…:tsktsk:


#15

Look what an excellent book Gone with the Wind is and I have read this more than once and there is nothing sexual in it, its just a good read and a real timeless classic. I am always sad that it takes losing so much for scarlet o’hara to realize that she had so much to begin with but for some people it takes losing like that to realize what they already had or have, so it speaks volumes.
Anybody else know any goodies that are like that? I love to Read.


#16

As long as they are clean… then they are fine…just don’t let them tempt you into lustful ideas or actions

God Bless–JMJ
Laura :slight_smile:


#17

I remember when the movie came out it was being portrayed as one of the most romantic movies of the year. I hadn’t read the book, so I had no idea what the story line was. We rented it when it came out on video. I was like “you’ve got to be kidding me?” Real romantic, the whole movie was about a woman cheating on her husband and her kids finding out about it after she died. Yuck!


closed #18

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