Rosary making question


#1

I apologize if this has been answered already, but I didn't see anything doing a search.

I decided to make a 10 bead rosary bracelet for my daughter (maybe one for myself) and am considering a regular 59 bead one for my husband. While looking for ideas on the type of beads, I saw things like this: trendytraditions.bigcartel.com/product/birthstone-first-communion-rosary-you-pick-the-month

Since converting, I want to make sure that I lead my children by example, and while I do pray CONSTANTLY (old Protestant habit that I am glad I kept), I would like the physical reminder for my children and though the bracelet would be a good idea for my oldest child.

I thought it was really nice, but then began to wonder if this was "okay"? I have seen that there can be ten beads (hence the bracelet size), but wasn't sure about the added beads with the name.

Is there anything "wrong" with this? I would hate to show up to the priest to ask for it to be blessed and get the side eye. ;) It seems like there is no rule written anywhere about this type of stuff. So sorry if I am missing something.


#2

no your fine - there are a few types of Rosaries us Catholics have - your Rosaries are just fine :D

Deus Tecum!


#3

Ohh, if I could just express to you how much joy the rosary brought into my heart. When we pray for our children, for the little ones, we certainly have them come with us to mass, not having to force them, and letting them experience true love and mercy from Jesus.


#4

I still pray on my 33 bead Anglican one. As a Lutheran, I was taught the traditional, pre Trent, rosary, but much prefer the shorter 33 bead one. Same prayers, but for me it accommodates my short attention span so that I am more likely to spend time with G-d.


#5

If you just want to buy beads...try this site or others like it: firemountaingems.com/greatproducts.asp

This site actually has instructions: rosarymakersguide.org/

I think it is great you are making your own!


#6

Thank you all so much. If it turns out how I want, I may post pictures. :D


#7

I've handmade a variety of Rosaries. If you do a google search, there are many sites where you can buy the beads as well as the crucifix and the other pieces, such as the centerpiece and some ideas for the Our Father beads, that aren't actually beads.

One rosary I made that I esp. like has a small icon of Mary painted onto the centerpiece, and the Our Father pieces are icons of other various images of Mary, such as Our Lady of Fatima, Lady of Lourdes, Lady of Guadaulupe, etc.....

You can also use a variety of beadmaking parts & supplies to make your rosaries unique, while still being true to the intent of what a set of Rosary beads should be.

If you have questions, feel free to PM me :)

~~Prairie Rose


#8

Mother Church is wise to instruct us on specific matters of great importance, such as abortion, in which we have only one choice—it is always wrong. She is also wise to give broad guidance on matters in which it is appropriate for the faithful to use some discretion; for example, she teaches us to be modest, but allows us to choose what clothes to wear.

I believe that the artistry and design of rosaries is one of those areas where faithful discretion is appropriate. I am the designer of the rosaries that you linked in your question, am a faithful Catholic, regularly seek spiritual direction, and joyfully submit myself to the Church's teaching authority—the Magisterium.

On the website, I clearly describe the twofold purpose of my shop, which is both ministry and a means to provide for my family as a stay-at-home mother of four children. I was genuinely called to the ministry of my work. From the beginning, outreach of the rosary to a younger generation has been my central aim.

As Blessed John Paul II observed in his 2002 apostolic letter, Rosarium Virginis Mariae, the rosary has been at "risk [of] being wrongly devalued, and therefore no longer taught to the younger generation."

He advises that, "If the Rosary is well presented, I am sure that young people will once more surprise adults by the way they make this prayer their own and recite it with the enthusiasm typical of their age group."

He finally charges us to "Rediscover the Rosary in the light of Scripture, in harmony with the Liturgy, and in the context of your daily lives."

My rosary designs are "well presented" and consistent with this traditional form of prayer. They also encourage young people to embrace this beautiful tradition and "confidently take up the Rosary once again."

The letter beads for personalization in my rosary designs are not used for prayer, which is clear by how they are placed in the design. Further, whether one chooses to include personalized beads within a rosary is a personal decision.

Finally, the context of this conversation illustrates that some may not be able to see the forest through the trees. The purpose of the rosary is prayer, and the purpose of prayer is to bring us closer to God the Father and Christ Jesus. Nothing about my rosary designs would act to discourage any person from praying the rosary. If, however, any one of my rosary designs encourages even one person to take up the rosary and grow in his or her prayer life, then my ministry is a great success.


#9

I also bead rosaries & rosary bracelets. I returned to the Church after nearly 20 years through the rosary and miraculous intercession of Our Blessed Mother.

A friend asked me to make a rosary for her parish priest who was retiring. I used black glass beads and in one decade, six of the beads spelled out "Father" and in another decade, some of the beads spelled out his last name.

It was VERY well-received by both the giver and the recipient - and subsequently blessed!

FWIW, Lewis & Company (www.rosaryparts.com) is one of my favorite go-to places for beads and everything related to rosary making.

Blessings on your work!


#10

There is a woman at our parish that makes rosaries and puts the names of the grandchildren on them. Or the names of your kids. Or whatever works out. :shrug:

They are beautiful. :thumbsup:


#11

I appreciate your response, but am not sure if your tone was meant the way it seems to across or if it was directed at me. Since written communication often betrays the tone, I won’t assume to know how you took my question. So I will explain…

As a new Catholic, I am constantly bombarded with “right” vs “wrong” arguments from others. This forum has allowed me to see where others are in their ideas and beliefs. I grew up shuffling between Protestant and Catholic churches and am well aware of the purpose of a rosary. So I am not sure what was meant by the “context” part of your reply. Simply asking if something is okay visually doesn’t mean that the purpose is misunderstood. Kneeling or standing to pray doesn’t change the purpose of praying, but depending on who you ask, there are right and wrong ways to do so.

I was not trying to imply that your designs discouraged anything. I wanted to make sure that there was no official “rule” on this. My Catholic grandmother feels that certain things are “wrong” but they are simply her preference. So I always go to a source if available. Since I couldn’t find anything, I asked the people here.

While your designs are lovely, I have seen these types of designs before from Catholics and people who simply just make various religious items. I don’t assume that something is proper simply because I see lots of people doing it. It has been an idea of mine for some time to make my own since I already was making other items. So nothing in my question was directed at you personally. I used your site just because it was the open window in my browser.

Best of luck to you in your business. :slight_smile:


#12

My sincere apologies, NeCo99, I meant no offense to you or anyone in the thread. My only intention was to attempt to explain my own thought process for my designs and business. I'm quite passionate on the matter as you may have picked up from my comment. Please forgive where my desire to express myself caused misunderstanding.

On a separate note, I technically grew up in a Catholic home but we did not practice regularly. As I've found myself among more and more strong Catholics, the right vs. wrong approach to everything can become a little overwhelming at times.

Peace to you!


#13

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