Run out of hosts?


#1

I recently went to (one of) my nephews First Communion (OF)... Deo Gratias! Anyway, we were seated in the front pew and had a good view of the (Extra)ordinary Minister of Holy Communion.

Well, that day there was a rather large congregation. It had gotten to the point that there was still a long line to go up for Communion, and the EMHC started breaking the Hosts into smaller and smaller pieces. It got to the point where the pieces of the Hosts were so small, that we couldn't see it from where we were sitting (in the front pew).

The priest never went to the Tabernacle to get more Hosts, so I assume that he had brought all of them out to begin with (because of the large congregation) and therefore no more Hosts in the Tabernacle.

My question is this... what is to be done in this situation, if in fact they had run out? Is the priest allowed to go up and consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass, or are those that were left without Communion in that Mass?

My GUESS is that the priests cannot (licitly) consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass and that those that may have been left would be without Communion?


#2

[quote="AdDeum, post:1, topic:325725"]
I recently went to (one of) my nephews First Communion (OF)... Deo Gratias! Anyway, we were seated in the front pew and had a good view of the (Extra)ordinary Minister of Holy Communion.

Well, that day there was a rather large congregation. It had gotten to the point that there was still a long line to go up for Communion, and the EMHC started breaking the Hosts into smaller and smaller pieces. It got to the point where the pieces of the Hosts were so small, that we couldn't see it from where we were sitting (in the front pew).

The priest never went to the Tabernacle to get more Hosts, so I assume that he had brought all of them out to begin with (because of the large congregation) and therefore no more Hosts in the Tabernacle.

My question is this... what is to be done in this situation, if in fact they had run out? Is the priest allowed to go up and consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass, or are those that were left without Communion in that Mass?

My GUESS is that the priests cannot (licitly) consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass and that those that may have been left would be without Communion?

[/quote]

It's sounds like poor planning on the part of the sacristan and the priest but and very rarely, i've seen this happen and the EMCH starts to brake hosts as you observed.


#3

[quote="AdDeum, post:1, topic:325725"]
I recently went to (one of) my nephews First Communion (OF)... Deo Gratias! Anyway, we were seated in the front pew and had a good view of the (Extra)ordinary Minister of Holy Communion.

Well, that day there was a rather large congregation. It had gotten to the point that there was still a long line to go up for Communion, and the EMHC started breaking the Hosts into smaller and smaller pieces. It got to the point where the pieces of the Hosts were so small, that we couldn't see it from where we were sitting (in the front pew).

The priest never went to the Tabernacle to get more Hosts, so I assume that he had brought all of them out to begin with (because of the large congregation) and therefore no more Hosts in the Tabernacle.

My question is this... what is to be done in this situation, if in fact they had run out? Is the priest allowed to go up and consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass, or are those that were left without Communion in that Mass?

My GUESS is that the priests cannot (licitly) consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass and that those that may have been left would be without Communion?

[/quote]

The exact same thing happened at Sunday mass for us. We were way over capacity crowd. The priest said after communion and before the blessing that it was his fault for not having enough. I asked him did you run out completely of hosts? He told me no, I just did not consentrate enough. He said I just had to start breaking them in half so that everyone could get some holy communion.
I will tell you that is good that the priests are not having enough hosts bc that means ppl are actually going to mass first of all plus taking part of holy communion.


#4

We do it like this, everyone who enter the Church walk to a small table and with a nice spoon pick up a host a put in a bowl that then, right before Mass, are given to the priest. And sometimes it do happen that they have to take a few host from the Tabernacle, but we have always a full Church and never have I seen them run out of hosts.


#5

Our parish does that at daily Mass, and never run out of Hosts.

On Sundays, we have 2 EMs as well as the priest, each with a full ciborium. Never have all 3 run out.

ICXC NIKA


#6

The ideal is that the congregation receives Communion in the form of hosts that have been consecrated at the same Mass. There is no harm in 'fractioning' the host - one receives the fullness of Our Lord in either of the eucharistic species and a half or quarter of a host is every bit as valid as the giant one that priest consumes at the altar. If Communion is being offered under both kinds, but one runs out, communicants can still partake by means of the other.

I've never heard of a situation where a priest consecrated a second 'batch' of hosts during a Mass (that would almost make Mass a form of 'factory line', which wouldn't be a good thing to do, in my opinion). In any case, reception of Communion isn't compulsory - one's obligation is met by being present and one can make a Spiritual Communion if there is no physical consecrated media available to do so.


#7

[quote="GEddie, post:5, topic:325725"]
Our parish does that at daily Mass, and never run out of Hosts.

On Sundays, we have 2 EMs as well as the priest, each with a full ciborium. Never have all 3 run out.

ICXC NIKA

[/quote]

I think this happen at a first communion Mass and that there was poor planning on somebody's part in that the extra wasn't planned for. Usually those Masses are very crowded with family etc coming. I know because I've seen it as a lector that the sacristan tries to estimate the amount for special Masses like this where there are larger than normal crowds. Obviously, that didn't happen.


#8

[quote="AdDeum, post:1, topic:325725"]
I recently went to (one of) my nephews First Communion (OF)... Deo Gratias! Anyway, we were seated in the front pew and had a good view of the (Extra)ordinary Minister of Holy Communion.

Well, that day there was a rather large congregation. It had gotten to the point that there was still a long line to go up for Communion, and the EMHC started breaking the Hosts into smaller and smaller pieces. It got to the point where the pieces of the Hosts were so small, that we couldn't see it from where we were sitting (in the front pew).

The priest never went to the Tabernacle to get more Hosts, so I assume that he had brought all of them out to begin with (because of the large congregation) and therefore no more Hosts in the Tabernacle.

My question is this... what is to be done in this situation, if in fact they had run out? Is the priest allowed to go up and consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass, or are those that were left without Communion in that Mass?

My GUESS is that the priests cannot (licitly) consecrate more Hosts in the same Mass and that those that may have been left would be without Communion?

[/quote]

No, the priest cannot go back and consecrate more hosts. As long as all of the First Communicants received, it's not really a big deal if they "ran out" before all of the rest of the congregation received. It's not the ideal but there is no mandate that everyone at Mass be given Communion.


#9

I remember growing up, we went to Mass at the Naval Base Chapel and prior to Mass, there was a table with a container of hosts with a pair of tongs, that when everyone entered, if you were receiving communion, you would place one in the ciborium next to it, this would then be brought up during the Offertory. I don't remember when, but this practice was ended years later.

one time though, I remember going up for communion, and seeing inside the Ciborium the priest held, there was very little consecrated hosts remaining, and I seated towards the front and there was a large congregation that day. Yet, the priest never ran out, and I know he wasn't breaking any into smaller pieces, that I saw anyways. My brother noticed also, it reminded me of when Jesus fed all the people with 5 loaves of bread and the 2 fish.


#10

there was one time they were about to run out of hosts, the EMHC (then called Lay Eucharistic Minister) went to the Sacristy and got some unconsecrated hosts and tried to give to the priest in order to continue giving Holy Communion. :eek:
This was a long time ago, and I just remember thinking, what is she doing?


#11

[quote="Z_Ninja, post:10, topic:325725"]
there was one time they were about to run out of hosts, the EMHC (then called Lay Eucharistic Minister) went to the Sacristy and got some unconsecrated hosts and tried to give to the priest in order to continue giving Holy Communion. :eek:
This was a long time ago, and I just remember thinking, what is she doing?

[/quote]

I've seen that happen at a Mass several years ago. The priest was the one who told the EMHC to go get unconsecrated hosts and he then proceeded to give the remaining parishioners Communion by intinction. I think it was the next year that Redemptionis Sacramentum came out and one of the articles in it categorically forbid using non-consecrated bread for intinction.


#12

I agree, it does seem like poor planning, but if it were truly an unexpected number of people attending, it might be excusable. How can anyone predict how many hosts will be needed? Once, I attended Mass for a special occasion, and before it began, the priest realized that he did not have enough hosts. There was still about 30 minutes to go, so he told the congregation about the problem, and said he was going to celebrate a private Mass on the altar, to consecrate more Hosts. There was nothing we need to do, just sit there and be prayerful and respectful, as we would be anyway. The private Mass was completely inaudible, and it only took him about 10-15 minutes, and everything was fine at the public Mass to follow.


#13

It's fine to break a few if necessary. Ideally, an extra deacon or master of ceremonies should be keeping an eye on this, and refilling ciboria from the tabernacle when necessary, but this isn't usually possible at smaller parishes were there is no extra clergyman around.


#14

[quote="Phemie, post:11, topic:325725"]
I've seen that happen at a Mass several years ago. The priest was the one who told the EMHC to go get unconsecrated hosts and he then proceeded to give the remaining parishioners Communion by intinction. I think it was the next year that Redemptionis Sacramentum came out and one of the articles in it categorically forbid using non-consecrated bread for intinction.

[/quote]

How long ago was that? The time I observed was well over 20+ years ago.


#15

[quote="Shirtless, post:12, topic:325725"]
I agree, it does seem like poor planning, but if it were truly an unexpected number of people attending, it might be excusable. How can anyone predict how many hosts will be needed? Once, I attended Mass for a special occasion, and before it began, the priest realized that he did not have enough hosts. There was still about 30 minutes to go, so he told the congregation about the problem, and said he was going to celebrate a private Mass on the altar, to consecrate more Hosts. There was nothing we need to do, just sit there and be prayerful and respectful, as we would be anyway. The private Mass was completely inaudible, and it only took him about 10-15 minutes, and everything was fine at the public Mass to follow.

[/quote]

OK, that doesn't make sense. If he had enough hosts available to consecrate in a private Mass, why not just add them to those that were to be consecrated at the special occasion Mass?


#16

[quote="chero23, post:3, topic:325725"]

I will tell you that is good that the priests are not having enough hosts bc that means ppl are actually going to mass first of all plus taking part of holy communion.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#17

When I was a sacristan, it was my job to know:
1. how many consecrated hosts were in the tabernacle. and
2. count people in the church and make sure that I put enough hosts in the ciborium that is carried up to the altar along with the wine and the gifts so that each person will get a host. If the priest ran out of hosts, it would have been my fault.
When we had a larger than normal number of folks at mass, I had plenty of time to go back into the sacristy and add hosts to the ciborium before mass started, or even after mass started.


#18

[quote="Phemie, post:15, topic:325725"]
OK, that doesn't make sense. If he had enough hosts available to consecrate in a private Mass, why not just add them to those that were to be consecrated at the special occasion Mass?

[/quote]

No, they are not talking of being short of altar-breads, that is to say, the round white breads that are consecrated into 'hosts' through transubstantiation.

They are talking about actual 'hosts', that is to say, they have been consecrated. A parish could have a cupboard-full of altar-breads, but still be short of hosts.


#19

[quote="gh4, post:17, topic:325725"]
When I was a sacristan, it was my job to know:
1. how many consecrated hosts were in the tabernacle. and
2. count people in the church and make sure that I put enough hosts in the ciborium that is carried up to the altar along with the wine and the gifts so that each person will get a host. If the priest ran out of hosts, it would have been my fault.
When we had a larger than normal number of folks at mass, I had plenty of time to go back into the sacristy and add hosts to the ciborium before mass started, or even after mass started.

[/quote]

With respect, you were adding altar-breads, not 'hosts'.


#20

[quote="paperwight66, post:19, topic:325725"]
With respect, you were adding altar-breads, not 'hosts'.

[/quote]

With respect, the word host has been used for centuries to speak of altar bread before it's consecrated.


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