Russia moves to decriminalize domestic violence


#1

The country has already decriminalized assault and battery that does not lead to actual bodily harm.

A bill that seeks to downgrade domestic violence from a criminal to an administrative offense passed its first reading on Wednesday in the duma, Russia’s lower house of parliament.

A total of 368 lawmakers voted in favor of the bill, with one “no” and one abstention.

Under the proposed rule, the charge of “battery within the family,” currently a criminal offense, would become an administrative one, with a fine, community service or a brief prison term levied against perpetrators. Criminal charges would still be laid if the offense is committed two or more times in one year.

Yelena Mizulina, the conservative politician who also successfully pushed Russia’s “gay propaganda” rules, was behind the move. She claimed on Twitter that the change was necessary to bring domestic violence offenses into line with other battery charges. Russia decriminalized assault and battery that did not lead to actual bodily harm in 2016.

In a speech to the Duma Wednesday, Mizulina said: “In the traditional family culture in Russia, parent-child relationships are built on the authority of the parents’ power,” adding: “The laws should support that family tradition.”

politico.eu/article/domestic-violence-russia-decriminalize/


#2

This is the natural end result of right-wing “pro-family” policies.

I’m not being entirely sincere, but the justification for this is strange. I’m a bit confused as to why the solution here is to downgrade domestic violence charges rather than establish a more severe penalty for battery charges. Is she implying that violence in the family should be an accepted part of traditional family relations?

I guess exposing children to homosexual relations is bad, but physical violence against children and other vulnerable family members isn’t so bad at all.


#3

Exactly.
“He hits you, ergo, he loves you.” A traditional proverb.


#4

I think there needs to be a lot more information here then the article provides before a fair judgment could be made.

This bill got nearly unanimous support.

I think these lawmakers know something about this that the article did not provide.


#5

Nope. This is just the way these lawmakers are.
Worst part of all, this is not even the most hideous bill.


#6

Of course.

Why gather more information when the fragments here support the agenda. :shrug:


#7

Dude, I live under the authority of these lawmakers. Which one of us has more information?


#8

Then by all means.
Provide more information.


#9

Do you speak Russian?


#10

Is it required?


#11

How else can I link you to resources in Russian? Clearly, you won’t take my word for it - you already haven’t. How the political climate is, what the lawmakers’, Mizulina’s in particular, views are - all this is easily googlable, but, unfortunately, not translated into English. If you’re biased in their favor, that’s a different story.


#12

You have not provided any information to disbelieve.


#13

Google “пакет Яровой”.

Spoiler alert: “not reporting a crime” is a criminal offense in itself. AND minors as old as 14 can be convicted of it.
CHILDREN are encouraged to report on adults and each other to police or be imprisoned.


#14

I’m not seeing a domestic violence bill after going through the first several results.


#15

So imprisoning 14 year olds for not reporting to the police on people who don’t support the current administration is fine? Thanks for letting me know where you stand soon enough.

“Законопроект о семейных побоях” or “Законопроект о декриминализации семейного насилия” are the words you’re looking for. This was my last message to you, within this thread and on CAF in general.


#16

The thread is about a domestic violence bill.

What thread are you reading?


#17

I doubt it. My guess is that this represents “giving up”; giving ground to what some characterize as a national calamity; increased alcoholism and intra-family violence resulting from it. I see this as something similar to easing laws against marijuana in the U.S. At some point, the authorities just cave.


#18

Tagates. You said in response to vz71 . . .

Dude, I live under the authority of these lawmakers. Which one of us has more information?

But vz71 could just as well have said . . . .

Dude, I live under the constant barrage of these fake news outlets. Which one of us has more information?

Why not just offer some convincing evidence?

I’m not disagreeing with you Tagates.

I just think you could come up with a more persuasive reason to affirm a “news story” that MAY be a partial truth.

God bless.

Cathoholic


#19

I empathize with you.

Sometimes I really believe the theory that Putinist-Stalinist trolls are trying to propagandize social media.


#20

Possibly a strange thought, esp. in view of Tagetes’s comments, but perhaps the reduction in consequences for the instances in which little physical harm is done will allow the consequences to be applied more frequently? Moreover, the fact that if there is a recurrence within 12 months the fuller consequences will be applied might mean that they are still taking DV seriously and setting up a paper trail for serial abusers?

Because when the original consequences are harsh, people are reluctant to apply them to less serious cases, so there is no documentation of previous events. When the consequences are the same for a slap or breaking a bone, when there is only a slap, the police tend to let it go. Now they will write a ticket ( or whatever), and if it happens again, there will be a record. And maybe it will be less likely to happen again, since consequences have been applied rather than evaded.


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