Russia set to ban US corn, soybean imports


#1

france24.com/en/20160210-russia-set-ban-us-corn-soybean-imports

**MOSCOW (AFP) -
Russia’s agriculture watchdog said Wednesday that it is going to ban imports of corn and soy from the United States starting next week over “unsafe” and “infected” product.

Russian officials held a phone conversation with their US counterparts Tuesday during which “expressing serious concern over continued shipments of grain product that is unsafe…” the Rosselkhoznadzor agency said in a statement.**

The article continues at the link.


#2

Is there a real evidence that GMO foods banned in Russia?


#3

Russia does this every once in awhile to accomplish objectives that aren’t the ones they claim. Some other countries do it too. Sometimes it’s protectionism. Sometimes it’s a bargaining tool. With Russia now, it might simply be an effort to stem the hemorrhaging of foreign currency.


#4

Apparently Russia is aiming to be the world’s largest exporter on non-GMO foods.

rt.com/business/324605-russia-putin-healthy-food/

nytimes.com/2014/11/19/world/europe/russia-food-sanctions-european-union-farmers.html?_r=0

I just have an interest in other countries banning and not importing certain U.S. foods. I’m not trying to pick on Russia, because this sort of thing is also done by foreign nations all around the world. Europe and Japan refuse to allow all kinds of toxic chemicals in their foods, Australia doesn’t want our genetically engineered salmon, etc. This article seems noteworthy though, because by doing this Russia may succeed in forcing the U.S. media to have an open and detailed public discussion about the Monsanto Corporation and all the evils surrounding it.


#5

Protectionism is understandable.
I remember the Russian media spoke loudly about the harmfulness of GMOs, and about taking care of the health of its citizens.
But is there a real evidence that the Russian large-scale farmers prove such benevolence?
They seem for several years just talking about it.
Are GMO foods so dangerous?


#6

A lot of places in Europe are boycotting Russian products or Russian natural gas as a protest against the invasion of Ukraine and other bad Russian actions. Russia is therefore running around banning everybody else’s food. This is just the latest dose.

Coincidentally, many of Putin’s buddies invested in farmland and Russian food factories right before all the bans started. Unfortunately, they don’t seem to be able to produce good food for anybody except rich people.

The thing Russians are maddest about were the mass destructions of European and American fruits and vegetables when ordinary Russians were unable to buy produce or even find it in stores, followed by Putin propaganda banquets showing off how Russia didn’t need that European produce. (And of course only his friends got to attend.)

Another sore spot is the resurgence of Stalin-era fake cheese as the only cheese available in stores for ordinary Russians.

Russia is a big country with vast natural resources and perfectly good farmland, much like Saskatchewan or the Western breadbasket states. The only reason the Russian people don’t eat good is mismanagement and theft by Putin and his cronies.


#7

Probably the time is not far off when non-GMO foods are pretty rare and not at all cost-effective to produce.

And, of course, there is no way anybody should believe Russian farmers do not use GMO seed.


#8

There are 38 countries worldwide that have banned GMO crops. I believe, any GMO foods must be labelled in the EU but not in all states in the USA. :shrug:

Oh well, the US population can be the guinea pigs.If the next generation isn’t growing extra heads, in the coming generations, then the other countries will look at it again. :wink:

sustainablepulse.com/2015/10/22/gm-crops-now-banned-in-36-countries-worldwide-sustainable-pulse-research/#.VrztX_KLTIU


#9

Just a trade war, I imagine.

The GMO issue is brought up to make the policy seem more high minded than it is.

ICXC NIKA


#10

GMO food might be as bad as some claim it is, but I am not persuaded of it yet. People are upset over plants that have been engineered to be resistant to herbicides or to certain insects. But then, there are a lot of those in nature too. In my part of the world, there are two very dramatic ones that occur naturally. One is the endophyte that lives in symbiosis with tall fescue grass. It can be really toxic to animals under certain conditions, but the real “purpose” of it is to kill insect pests. Black walnut trees produce a powerful herbicide. Almost nothing will grow under a black walnut other than grass, and not every kind of grass either.

Somehow, over some number of eons I don’t know, those plants developed insecticides and herbicides that beat just about any that humans come up with. And there a lot more of them than those; those two are just dramatic enough to be obvious. But somehow or other, natural selection or something caused plants to develop those things, and we don’t think anything of them. Cattle eat tall fescue (and sometimes get sick from it in dry weather) and we eat the cattle. We eat black walnuts without a thought to the herbicide, and plant those trees in our yards.

GMOs do those same things. Perhaps, for some reason, they’re worse than naturally-occurring pesticides and herbicides. But I have not seen anything really scientific that tells me they are.

Some GMOs are resistant to herbicides; like “Roundup ready” corn. Maybe that’s a bad thing when one consumes the corn. But I have not seen anything really persuasive that it is. But then, there are plants, like wild blackberries, that are powerfully resistant to the same herbicides.

And corn itself is “unnatural”. Corn can’t survive without human intervention. If people didn’t raise it, there wouldn’t be any. Somehow, Indians developed it from some grass or other, and nobody, to this day, knows how they did it or how long it took to get it done.

The prized vineyards of Europe are “unnatural” and would die out in a couple of years if not for human intervention. Every last one of their vines are sitting on American wild grape root stock originally from southwest Missouri and northwest Arkansas. Why? Because a naturally occurring mite would have caused them to go extinct in the 19th Century; a mite with which wild grape American rootstock lives symbiotically.

Domestic strawberries are “unnatural” too. A patch of them will die out quickly without human intervention notwithstanding that wild strawberries (from which they were modified) can survive without it.

I’ll quit here, but I guess humans have been “guinea pigs” for a lot of things for a long time.


#11

It looks like tit for tat, this is not the only action Russia has taken this week diplomatically speaking.


#12

And corn itself is “unnatural”. Corn can’t survive without human intervention. If people didn’t raise it, there wouldn’t be any. Somehow, Indians developed it from some grass or other, and nobody, to this day, knows how they did it or how long it took to get it done.

Wow.

Source?


#13

Good luck. :thumbsup: :slight_smile:


#14

Here, for instance.

campsilos.org/mod3/students/c_history.shtml


#15

You too. Watch that those strawberries don’t getcha! :slight_smile:


#16

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