Ryan Maintains Endorsement of Trump, Tells House GOP 'Do What's Best for You


#1

House Speaker Paul Ryan is not rescinding his endorsement of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump but told fellow House Republicans in a conference call today that they should handle Trump however they think it will most benefit their own races.

“You all need to do what’s best for you in your district,” he told the representatives, according to a person on the call.
He also said he would not defend Trump or campaign with him for the next 30 days.

AshLee Strong, a Ryan spokeswoman, said that there was no change in his position on Trump.

Ryan endorsed Trump in June, writing in an op-ed, “I feel confident he would help us turn the ideas in this agenda into laws to help improve people’s lives. That’s why I’ll be voting for him this fall.”

A person on the call said Ryan will spend the rest of the campaign cycle “making sure that Hillary Clinton does not get a blank check with a Democrat-controlled Congress.”

Strong said Ryan was explicit on the conference call that he was not conceding that Clinton would win the presidential election on Nov. 8.
abcnews.go.com/Politics/debate-trumps-candidacy-leaves-questions-gop/story?id=42701164


#2

Most headlines are not saying that “Ryan Maintains Endorsement” and instead say:

NBC: Paul Ryan Says He Won’t Defend Trump

CNN: Ryan Turns Away From Trump

CBS: Paul Ryan tells Republicans he won’t defend Trump

Washington Post: Speaker Ryan says he will not defend or campaign for Trump

New York Times: House Speaker Says He Won’t Defend Trump

So although Ryan has not technically withdrawn his endorsement by stating that, he is withdrawing his endorsement by his actions, i.e. not campaigning for Trump or defending him.


#3

There is one thing admirable about democrats compared to republicans: they don’t eat their own.


#4

Yes, they do. They managed to get all their “bluedog” pro-life colleagues (64 or so) kicked out in 2010.


#5

This is a major difference between elected Republicans & Democrats

Democrats are typically party first, personal values 2nd.
Republicans are typically personal values 1st, party second.

This is both a huge strength and huge weakness for both parties.


#6

Didn’t know that. Thanks.


#7

But they lionize folk who keep $80,000 in cash in their freezer, former KKK members, and drunk drivers who kill.


#8

That’s the liberal media for you. Can’t believe a thing they say!! God Bless, Memaw


#9

Why is it that politicians of the same party are not allowed to withdraw support from those they feel are unqualified to be president?

Do you somehow loose your free will when you join a party? I mean seriously, its questionable whether Trump is even a Republican at all given his history and current statements to say nothing of his character and morals.

Taking into account the way he campaigned in the primary and frequently during the last few months, he’s done nothing but deride and insult the “establishment”. What has he done to deserve the unwavering support of people he treats with disdain?


#10

Of course they are allowed to do whatever they want; in fact that’s exactly what they do. They don’t care that the majority of republicans have voted for Trump. They will do anything to stay in office, say and do anything that would benefit themselves and their protected interests. They only pretend to care about the people when it’s time for reelection.

So yes, Paul Ryan is entitled to do anything he wants, including doing nothing to oppose Obama’s agenda, openly sabotaging his own party’s candidate, and when Trump wins, openly opposing the conservative agenda that Trump wants to implement. Yes he’s allowed to do that until the voters have had enough.


#11

If Dems were abandoning Clinton by the bushel and/or never endorsed her to begin with because they felt she was unfit to be president, conservatives would be cheering in the streets about these peoples fine character. When it happens to them, they’re self serving traitors who eat their own. :rolleyes:


#12

Not all of us would think it. I was a “cradle Democrat” who worked for the party and held office in the party. I had to leave it when abortion became its only real value. I never became a Repub.

But in my early years as a party activist, I was sometimes frustrated by the divisions within the party, but I liked them too. Democrats back then were as internally contentious as Repubs are now. I rather thought it was ennobling. Had the aura of freedom about it, like the contentions among the Founders. But now the Dems follow the leader in lockstep, like so many lemmings. Reminds one of the old Soviet elections in which one could boldly mark one’s ballot for the only candidate in front of some party official.


#13

:thumbsup:


#14

I think you need to be taking the loss of Republican congressional seat with a little more concern and seriousness. Yes, I know that you are upset about Trumps relationship with the Republican party right now. But, please try to look at the big picture. We don’t just have a presidential election going on, but also an election in which the GOP is rightfully concerned about maintaining control of congress. The Republican party is at risk at losing BOTH the Presidency and control of congress over to the Democrats. That is a VERY, VERY, VERY bad thing. The Republican congressman are rightfully concerned of losing their congressional elections.

Let me tell you why losing control of the Senate would be a bad thing. In 1993 when Bill Clinton nominated Ruth Ginsberg for the Supreme Court, during that year the Democrats held control of the Senate. Yes, it was Bill Clinton who chose Ginsburg, however, It was the Democrat Senate who approved Ruth Ginsburgs nomination.

It is now a very strong likely event that Hillary Clinton wins the presidency…with this event along the horizon, we absolutely do need the Republicans to maintain control of Congress. Not only to strongly act as a check and balance to whatever Supreme Court Justice that she has in mind. But, also to strongly evaluate whatever other policies she wants to implement. A Republican Congress acts as a check and balance to Hillary Clinton’s presidency. In addition to the GOP losing the Presidency it would indeed also be a very scary thing for the Republicans to lose control of Congress. The Republicans are wisely concerned about losing their congressional seats due to Donald Trump’s scandals. It should concern all of us as well.


#15

Yes,voting the down ticket is absolutely essential ,especially now in light of the very real possibility the race between HC and Trump is over.Very doubtful Trump can win at this point.


#16

For the record, Ginsburg was recommended by Warren Hatch, a Republican. It seems both parties are usually involved in the nomination-confirmation process.

Of course if the Senate goes the nuclear option, all bets are off.


#17

Maybe, but I was going mainly by the Stupak Amendment vote.


#18

The senate was more cordial then. And she did not answer any questions on constitutionality. If she had said she believed the Constitution is “outmoded” as she later did, I doubt even the Dem senators would have voted to confirm her.

People cared about the Constitution then. Less so now, of course.


#19

The majority of republicans did not vote for Trump. He got less than 45% of the total primary votes.


#20

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