Sabbatarians: When is the Sabbath?


#1

For those of you who hold that Sunday worship is the Mark of the Beast and that going to church on Saturday (something which Catholics do); when is the Sabbath and how do you calculate it? You should know that Western Europe moved from a Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar between the 16th and 18th centuries. Many countries lost several days during the transition. How is it then that you can calculate when the Sabbath is using the Gregorian calendar which implemented by the Catholic Church? Also, it is my hypothesis that the Sabbath was intended for a specific nation the Israeli people) in a specific region (there areas on Earth which don’t have sunrise or sunset for many months) in response to certain events which happened in their history. The Sabbath is a period of rest, plain and simple. You don’t need to worship on the Sabbath to keep it holy, you just need to rest. Are those who keep Sunday as their day of worship part of the Beast System? Nah.


#2

The commandment is to remember the Sabbath and keep it holy. Not sure that can be interpeted as “rest”. There’s very little in the Torah or “OT” to suggest that we are to cease (certain kinds) of work.


#3

According to Pharasitical Judaism (modern day Orthodox Judaism) I believe it’s interpreted to mean rest. Are you an Orthodox Jew, Valke2?


#4

I’m not orthodox, no. THere are many many laws that are in place to ensure that we remenber the sabbath and keep it holy. Ceasing from 39 forms of work is one of them. BUt there’s not really anything in the Torah that says this. It is almost all from Talmudic sources. I’m not disputing that shabbat is a day of rest. I’m only saying there’s not much in the Torah itself to go by in reaching the conclusion that we are to cease specific kinds of work.


#5

I’m not disputing that either. :thumbsup:


#6

Based on what I’ve read by many SDAs, I don’t see how they can use anything but the traditional Hebraic calendar without bearing the “Mark of the Beast” as they understand it. Even the Julian Calender, before the Catholic Church altered it, was created by pre-Christian pagan Rom… At best, perhaps they can use the Julian calendar…but it gradually gets a few days off as the years go by, so Saturday isn’t necessarily the Sabbath.


#7

The Sabbath is Saturday

The Lords Day is Sunday

I rest on the Sabbath and I work on the Lords Day

Not through personal choice :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

Where in the Law of Moses does it say that the sabbath is Saturday?

What it says is that you should work for six consecutive days and then rest for one day. It does not say that you must start working on Sunday and rest on Saturday.

If I’m wrong, please show me where Moses taught this. If the pharisees under Roman rule later on established Saturday as the “seventh day”, why would that be authoritative to a Christian?

Paul


#9

The switchover of calendars did not change the order of days, just the numbering, therefore it had nothing to do with the loss of the weekly cycle which is what would be necessary in order to say that we can no longer say for sure what day is Saturday. The Catholic church in the Catechism also teaches us that the Lords day follows the Sabbath…i.e. saturday and sunday. Further, to think that Saturday is not the Sabbath is to have to assume that all Christians and Jews have lost the weekly cycle at some point and agreed on a random day as Saturday for the Sabbath. This is absurd. Christians have been celebrating the Lords Day as the day after the Sabbath since the first century, and Jews have been celebrating the Sabbath for nearly 4,000 years. Not one person has ever shown that there has been a mass confusion on the part of the weekly cycle and we therefore dont know what day the Sabbath is now.

Finally, even the US Naval Observatory has confirmed that there has been no break or confusion on the weekly cycle. The biggest question regarding Saturday the international date line, which is a man made delineation.


#10

Paul Dupre wrote:

What it says is that you should work for six consecutive days and then rest for one day. It does not say that you must start working on Sunday and rest on Saturday.

Amen :stuck_out_tongue:

I wish I could work on the sabbath and rest on the Lord’s day as that is our Christian Sabbath and I would much rather go to Mass on the Sabbath.

My understanding is that traditionally Sunday has become widely accepted as the first day of the week. It is indicated in John that the Lord after His glorious resurrection visited His blessed Apostles ‘on the eve of the first day of the week’.Jn 20:19.

That is reason enough for me the Lord could have appeared on the Sabbath seventh day of the week but He did not. I am yet to hear a Sabbatarian give me a satisfactory explanation for that.

I suppose you are right: the first day of the week could be any day. In my line of work [criminal justice], the first day of the week is Monday, the last day of the week is Sunday and has been for the last 20-years that I am aware of. :stuck_out_tongue:

But I think the Lord started work on Sunday as the first day of the week is always the busiest and there is less traffic around on Sundays :stuck_out_tongue: so makes sense He would have made the first day of the week a Sunday :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

Mea culpa.

But the fact remains is that they’re still following the calendar of the Catholic Church, and thereby in its “sin.”


#12

But the fact remains is that they’re still following the calendar of the Catholic Church, and thereby in its “sin.”

:stuck_out_tongue:

Amen


#13

Afterall, if they follow the jewish reckoning of days, the Jewish reckoning of years in prophecy, why not the Jewish Calendar?
Brandon


#14

if they follow the jewish reckoning of days, the Jewish reckoning of years in prophecy, why not the Jewish Calendar?

SDA2RC, nice one,. I had not thought of that. I will use that. Thanks :thumbsup:


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