Sacraments and state of mortal sin


#1

I know an older couple who are both divorced and remarried to each other. One of their former spouses is now deceased. The other is alive and well.

The parish priest invited them to come to mass and receive communion, after going to confession, of course. He explained to them that God is all forgiving. If God can forgive a murderer, He can certainly forgive someone who made a mistake in marriage.

While I believe this is contrary to church teachings, it seemed to make more sense.

It seems that the church teaches us that the one whose spouse has passed is now clear to receive the Eucharist, through no action of his own, and the other is not approved unless an annulment is processed. How can this be right?


#2

Jesus,our Lords peace with You.
Sorry for my bad english. Dear friend. Who do wrong in this case. Those who re-married? The priest? Or God showing them with His everlasting love? We know the rules,we know what we can't do and can do. We do as the Church teaches. We pray,we attend mass,but we also sin,do wrong against others,we think first of our self,we confess and we sin again. As a old lady I know thinks before she do something:"What would Jesus do?" And maybe You should think like that aswell. Nothing personal,I admire You for doing what the Church teaches,but once in a while,and o'boy how many angre letters I will have waiting for me tomorrow,mercy is in place. This priest has something many don't have,he realy serve The Church,and how stupid this might sound,he do it out of love,and believe me,that is moore then all priests are doing. It is easy to do as You are told to,but hard to do what is right.


#3

Did you mean to write, divorced and remarried to other people, divorced again and married their original spouse?


#4

You are correct, this is in violation of Church teaching:

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_14091994_rec-holy-comm-by-divorced_en.html

  1. Members of the faithful who live together as husband and wife with persons other than their legitimate spouses may not receive Holy Communion.

#5

[quote="Barbkw, post:3, topic:218859"]
Did you mean to write, divorced and remarried to other people, divorced again and married their original spouse?

[/quote]

It sounded like they had been married once, divorced and then remarried to their original spouse. In that case, without an annulment the Church recognizes the marriage as valid.


#6

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:1, topic:218859"]

It seems that the church teaches us that the one whose spouse has passed is now clear to receive the Eucharist, through no action of his own, and the other is not approved unless an annulment is processed. How can this be right?

[/quote]

NEITHER of them is able to receive the Eucharist until their current marriage is convalidated. They are married outside the Church and one of them is still married to their former spouse as far as the Church is concerned.


#7

[quote="utah_rose, post:5, topic:218859"]
It sounded like they had been married once, divorced and then remarried to their original spouse. In that case, without an annulment the Church recognizes the marriage as valid.

[/quote]

No, although poorly worded, the OP is saying that a couple who is now married to each other civilly were previously married to and divorced from other people. One of the former spouses has died, but the other has a former spouse that is still living.

So, basically two people who divorced their original spouses and "remarried" via civil marriage.

Neither of them may receive the Eucharist until the one who has a living spouse has been declared free to marry by the Church via a decree of nullity or another procedure (depending upon specifics of the first marriage) AND the current marriage is convalidated.


#8

[quote="1ke, post:7, topic:218859"]
No, although poorly worded, the OP is saying that a couple who is now married to each other civilly were previously married to and divorced from other people. One of the former spouses has died, but the other has a former spouse that is still living.

So, basically two people who divorced their original spouses and "remarried" via civil marriage.

Neither of them may receive the Eucharist until the one who has a living spouse has been declared free to marry by the Church via a decree of nullity or another procedure (depending upon specifics of the first marriage) AND the current marriage is convalidated.

[/quote]

OP may mean this:

Couple is married in the Church, then divorce and marry others, then divorce others and remarry.


#9

They can confess and receive the Eucharists, but in order to have a valid confession they must have the intention of sinning no more. In their situation that would include not continuing their adulterous relationship.

Perhaps they are living as brother and sister until until they can make proper living arrangements.


#10

The couple were each married to different people, in the Church. They divorced and married each other. Sorry for the confusion.

Here is a human interest part of the story. The gentleman is a WWII veteran who took part in the Battle of Iwo Jima. During the battle he made one of those "deals" with God. Having survived the battle he joined a Catholic Church and was Catechized by a priest in Hawaii

50 years later he met the same priest at a wedding. Father asked him why he did not receive communion. He told the priest that he was not allowed because of his marital situation. Then, the priest told him that he could.


#11

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:10, topic:218859"]
The couple were each married to different people, in the Church. They divorced and married each other. Sorry for the confusion.

Here is a human interest part of the story. The gentleman is a WWII veteran who took part in the Battle of Iwo Jima. During the battle he made one of those "deals" with God. Having survived the battle he joined a Catholic Church and was Catechized by a priest in Hawaii

50 years later he met the same priest at a wedding. Father asked him why he did not receive communion. He told the priest that he was not allowed because of his marital situation. Then, the priest told him that he could.

[/quote]

Oh, how sad.
Obviously this priest is quite elderly. While I know personally many 'over 70' priests who are very devout and orthodox, I also know quite a few who are still convinced that they know better than "The Vatican" and that any and all Catholic teachings are simply 'guidelines' that can be ignored or even defied if 'they' deem it to be the 'loving' thing to do. :(

How sad that this priest, who was responsible for bringing a soul to Christ, is now the one who is attempting to separate that soul from Christ.

In the one case, he brought a man to the fullness of faith.
Now at the 'end', he is trying to deny the man fullness and offering 'death' instead, and presenting it as 'kindness'.

This is one of the saddest things I have ever heard. I hope the man is able to see the truth, to know that the priest is mistaken, and to keep on in the correct teachings, and to forgive that priest. . .and I hope the priest himself comes to realize his error, and repents. . .


#12

[quote="Tantum_ergo, post:11, topic:218859"]

This is one of the saddest things I have ever heard. I hope the man is able to see the truth, to know that the priest is mistaken, and to keep on in the correct teachings, and to forgive that priest. . .and I hope the priest himself comes to realize his error, and repents. . .

[/quote]

There really isn't enough information to know that the priest is in error. There is a way for the couple to receive the Eucharist.

The faithful who persist in such a situation may receive Holy Communion only after obtaining sacramental absolution, which may be given only "to those who, repenting of having broken the sign of the Covenant and of fidelity to Christ, are sincerely ready to undertake a way of life that is no longer in contradiction to the indissolubility of marriage. This means, in practice, that when for serious reasons, for example, for the children's upbringing, a man and a woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate, they 'take on themselves the duty to live in complete continence, that is, by abstinence from the acts proper to married couples'"(8). In such a case they may receive Holy Communion as long as they respect the obligation to avoid giving scandal.

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_14091994_rec-holy-comm-by-divorced_en.html


#13

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:12, topic:218859"]
There really isn't enough information to know that the priest is in error. There is a way for the couple to receive the Eucharist.

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_14091994_rec-holy-comm-by-divorced_en.html

[/quote]

Thanks. I'll bet that you nailed it.


#14

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:13, topic:218859"]
Thanks. I'll bet that you nailed it.

[/quote]

Perhaps, but considering that this couple is 'elderly' I rather doubt that they 'must' remain together for the sake of children' which is the example given.

Also, consider that the very first post had the priest saying that the man could receive 'because God understands that you can make a mistake in marriage'.

"Make a mistake" is very, very different from a situation whereby a couple for serious reason live in continence.

I won't say this isn't the case, but if it were, then surely there would have been no reason for the priest to speak of 'mistake in marriage', correct?

Had you not spoken of the priest's 'reason', I think most of us would have assumed that the couple was living chastely and that THAT was the 'reason' they could receive. But dragging in a 'God <<>> about 'mistakes in marriage' makes it seem as though they are NOT living as brother and sister and that GOD is supposed to be the one to make the adjustment to 'let the people be HAPPY'. And that, we say, is not what the Church teaches.

But since we can't know for sure, I am certainly willing to hope that the priest's comments are either a misunderstanding or not applicable, and that the true reason is that the couple is living as brother and sister and thus following Church teaching.


#15

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