Saint Kateri Tekakwitha becomes North America’s first native saint

cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/10/18/f-ormiston-kateri-tekakwitha-rome.html

ctvnews.ca/canada/who-is-kateri-tekakwitha-north-america-s-first-aboriginal-saint-1.1003753

Kateri Tekakwitha, a woman credited with life-saving miracles, has become North America’s first aboriginal saint after a canonization mass at the Vatican.

Kateri was among the seven saints Pope Benedict XVI added to the roster of Catholic role models Sunday morning as he tries to rekindle the faith in places where it’s lagging.

Praise be to God. Saint Kateri Tekakwitha pray for us!

And she was referenced as a Protectress of Canada!

Wow thats cool :smiley:

Excellent! :smiley:

Anybody catch the anti-catholic press releases associated with her canonization? Seems her canonization has given the media an excuse to attack the church again.

I’m a little surprised that these articles are fairly well written. Much better then when St. Br. Andre was canonized (when one news source said he was added to the “Catholic pantheon” :eek:)

A small correction: Mexico is considered part of North America (and they rightly refer to themselves as “Norte Americanos”). As such, the first aboriginal North American saint is San Juan Diego, visionary of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Saint Kateri is the first native or aboriginal American in what is now called the United States.

In coloquial context in Canada and the US, we don’t generally include indigenous Mexicans in “native” or “aboriginal”. Because she is from Canada/US, we use the term as it is used in Canada and the US (which, generally speaking, includes those identified as an Indian Tribe in the US and those peoples counted as an “Indian” by the Indian Act in Canada plus the Inuit and sometimes Métis depending on the context).

You’ll notice similarly that we call Saint Jean de Brébeuf, Isaac Jogues and the other the North American Martyrs (called the Canadian Martyrs in Canada), despite the fact that they only were basically in New York/Ontario. The area around upper New York/Ontario was a disputed area (at various times governed by French, British, American, and Canadian), and because there was free-er movement of people in that area we find several Saints and other people who we would identify as both Canadian and American, and so for simplicity sake we simply refer to them as “North Americans”.

WOOOOOOHOOOOOO!!! :smiley:

I’m soo excited! When I get a chance, I’m going up to see her!! Quebec, right?

I think if you do some back-tracking in CBC News Archives in 2010 and farther back you’ll find both on CBC Television and CBC Radio Canada 1 and 2 coast to coast you’ll find a huge amount of news coverage on Brother Andre before he was officially named a Saint by Pope Benedict XVI. Same goes for news coverage on recent Saint Kateri Tekakwitha.

CBC Canada not unlike its British cousin BBC News is world renown in its in deph news coverage. Far better than CTV News because it cuts through the chaff and filler nonscence.

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha or as some refer her as Saint Catherine Tekakwitha was born officially as an American. But because she resided on both sides of the border in upper state New York and Canada’s Jesuit mission village of Kahnawake, south of Montreal she’s a special shared Saint for both countries.Officially she’s an Algonquin–Mohawk.
Sometimes referred to as the “Lily of the Mohawks” I hope she serves as an inspiration for natives on the reservation bordering Upper State New York, Quebec and Ontario as she does for the rest of the world.

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