Saints in the Eastern Churches


#1

Does Rome recognise saints beatified after schism? If one of the patriarchs of some Russian, Greek, or Eastern Orthodox church declares (say, jazz musician John Coltrane, for example) a saint, does that carry any recognician in the RC?

Thanks


#2

I am not aware of any Eastern Orthodox Saints AFTER 1054 being sainted in the West. But I DO know that as an Eastern Catholic, my pastor will mention the lives of the Orthodox Saints, since they a part of our Eastern Christianity.

But I do know for the Eastern Rites that are a part of the Catholic Church, those Saints of recent centuries since the ‘reunification’ does get some mention. Pope John Paul II sainted some of our Eastern European Saints, particulary those from WWII.


#3

Well, sort of. St. Gregory Palamas is the only one I can think of, however. Others, such as St. John of Shanghai/San Francisco are not considered saints in the Catholic Church.

Deacon Ed


#4

[quote=Edwin1961]I am not aware of any Eastern Orthodox Saints AFTER 1054 being sainted in the West. But I DO know that as an Eastern Catholic, my pastor will mention the lives of the Orthodox Saints, since they a part of our Eastern Christianity.
[/quote]

There have been a number.

The ones who come to mind are Saint Seraphim of Sarov and Saint Gregory Palamas (somewhat surprising in the case of trhe latter.) There are others but I cannot remember them off hand.


#5

St. Euphrosyne of Belarus was canonized in 1980 I think (I’m certain of the canonization, not the date). She lived in the post-Schism Church, 12th century, I believe.


#6

One thing important to realise is that the Eastern Orthodox process for glorifying (I think that is the proper term) and the Catholic process for canonising Saints are opposite.

In the CC the process is top down, from Rome.

In the EO the process is from the bottom up. Saints are venerated in locales by the common people, eventually the hierarchs then recognise the glorification of the Saints, Icons are written, Kontakia and Prokemenon are written with other hymns and prayers and then the individual is recognised as a Saint in the individual national church, and added to the calendar.

The various jurisdictions do not always recognise the same Saints. For example ROCOR accepted the Royal Family as passion-bearers Saints for many years before the Moscow Patriarchate accepted them.

Fr. Ambrose corrections and comments are welcomed.


#7

[quote=boppysbud]One thing important to realise is that the Eastern Orthodox process for glorifying (I think that is the proper term) and the Catholic process for canonising Saints are opposite.

In the CC the process is top down, from Rome.

In the EO the process is from the bottom up.
[/quote]

Neat! Thanks for the info. That goes a long way toward explaining some of the seemingly odd choices for sainthood in our sepoarated Sister churches.

I’m still blown away by the John Coltrane thing…


#8

[quote=Fr Ambrose]There have been a number.

The ones who come to mind are Saint Seraphim of Sarov and Saint Gregory Palamas (somewhat surprising in the case of trhe latter.) There are others but I cannot remember them off hand.
[/quote]

St. Herman the Wonder-worker of Alaska is a favorite around here.


#9

St. Euphrosyne of Belarus was canonized in 1980 I think

Does this name mean Evfrosinia Polotska who is considered major protector of women monks and also of Belarus, although died in Jerusalem and was buried in Kyiv before returning to Polotsk monastery before Revolution. Why would Latin Church want to canonize (to place in canon of saints) a woman already with saint day in Russia, Belarus and Ukraina??


#10

Dear Volodymyr,

Though Eastern Catholics no doubt already venerated St. Euphrosyne for as long as the Orthodox have, there was no FORMAL recognition of her sainthood in the Catholic Church until the 20th century. As someone noted, sainthood in the Orthodox Church is normally “down-up,” while in the Catholic Church it is officially “up-down.” In this case, I think the FORMAL recognition of her sainthood was just that, a formality. I do not doubt that JPII of blessed memory who pronounced the formal canonization, himself a Slavic Christian, already had a private veneration of her.

God bless


#11

Regenhund (rain dog?).

No Orthodox church accepts John Coltrane as a Saint.

“Saint John Coltrane Orthodox Church” is really just a jazz club located in San Francisco (where else?). I am fairly certain that it was set up as a tax shelter. They have no Liturgy or worship, just “jam sessions”.


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