Saints raised from the dead Mat.27:52-53


#1

In the gospel of Matthew 27:52-23 it says:

“and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many.”

What do you make of this? Do you take it figuratively?

Who were these saints? Did they return to their former occupations? Did they include prophets? Did they appear to “many” for 24 hours and then die natural deaths? Or return to their graves and rebury themselves?

Shall we call this mythology? :shrug:

If so, is Lazarus raising from the dead also myth? How about Jesus? He is said to have raised from the dead and ascended to “heaven”? :rolleyes: Literally or figuratively?

Has anyone got any evidence that people can come back from the dead? Thanks.


#2

[quote="Dave_B, post:1, topic:342723"]
In the gospel of Matthew 27:52-23 it says:

"and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many."

What do you make of this? Do you take it figuratively?

Who were these saints? Did they return to their former occupations? Did they include prophets? Did they appear to "many" for 24 hours and then die natural deaths? Or return to their graves and rebury themselves?

Shall we call this mythology? :shrug:

If so, is Lazarus raising from the dead also myth? How about Jesus? He is said to have raised from the dead and ascended to "heaven"? :rolleyes: Literally or figuratively?

Has anyone got any evidence that people can come back from the dead? Thanks.

[/quote]

I take this literally. It is the fulfillment of the prophecies of Ezekiel 37 and Isaiah 25:7-8. We can only assume what happened to them, because St Matthew doesn't say. My guess is that they probably were received by their loved ones, and preached to them about the fulfillment of the Old Covenant and their salvation in Christ.

  1. Lazarus' rising is not taken figuratively, it is quite literal.
  2. Jesus' ascension is most DEFINITELY literal.

PS. You seem to feel that these things are impossible and illogical. I suggest checking out the following link: ncregister.com/blog/mark-shea/the-resurrections-of-matthew-2752-53


#3

I believe this is in agreement with Hebrews 13:2Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it.

That’s the only other glance in the NT of potential Angels visiting others as far as I know. I’m sure like Jesus returning and appearing to 500 it happened but people thought not to believe, and continue to think in that fashion.

This sort of thing was going on following the Resurrection of Jesus:

1 corin 15:6After that, he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers and sisters at the same time, most of whom are still living, though some have fallen asleep.


#4

Opinions vary about this particular event. Some think these were merely apparitions, like Samuel in 1 Samuel 28:12-19. However, I think most think these saints, undoubtedly Old Testament saints, who may well have included prophets, were literally risen from the dead in recomposed physical bodies of a glorified nature similar to that of the risen Lord Jesus Christ and that they ascended into heaven with their Lord.

If so, is Lazarus raising from the dead also myth? How about Jesus? He is said to have raised from the dead and ascended to “heaven”? :rolleyes: Literally or figuratively?

Lazarus literally rose from the dead with a normal, mortal physical body. Lazarus is thought to have died again sometime later, as well as those raised by the prophets in Old Testament times, those raised by Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry, and those raised by the apostles after Jesus’ ascension.

Has anyone got any evidence that people can come back from the dead? Thanks.

Matthew is the only writer to mention the resurrection of these saints, unless this is the “first resurrection” mentioned in Revelation 20:4-6.

There are some places in Sacred Scripture that employ the image of rising from the dead in a figurative or spiritual sense. For instance, in Jesus’ parable of the Prodigal Son, when the father says, “This brother of yours was dead, and has come back to life” (Luke 15:32), he is speaking about his son in a figurative way; his son did not actually die. Also, in Colossians 2:12, when St. Paul says that, in baptism, Christians are buried with Christ and raised to life in him, he is speaking about a spiritual rebirth, not a physical death and resurrection.

However, most instances in Sacred Scripture that talk about someone rising from the dead are understood literally, someone really dead really came back to life again. For example, in the Old Testament, the widow’s son was really dead and the prophet Elijah really raised him from the dead. (1 Kings 17:22) During his lifetime, the prophet Elisha really raised another woman’s son from the dead (2 Kings 4:35) and, after his death, he really raised a man from the dead. (2 Kings 13:21) In the New Testament, besides really raising Lazarus from the dead (John 11:44), Jesus Christ also really raised Jairus’ daughter (Matthew 9:25, Mark 5:42, and Luke 8:55) and a widow’s son from the dead. (Luke 7:15) St. Peter really raised Tabitha from the dead (Acts 9:40) and St. Paul really raised Eutychus from the dead. (Acts 20:10)


#5

Opinions vary about this particular event. Some think these were merely apparitions, like Samuel in 1 Samuel 28:12-19. However, I think most think these saints, undoubtedly Old Testament saints, who may well have included prophets, were literally risen from the dead in recomposed physical bodies of a glorified nature similar to that of the risen Lord Jesus Christ and that they ascended into heaven with their Lord.

If so, is Lazarus raising from the dead also myth? How about Jesus? He is said to have raised from the dead and ascended to “heaven”? :rolleyes: Literally or figuratively?

Lazarus literally rose from the dead with a normal, mortal physical body. Lazarus is thought to have died again sometime later, as well as those raised by the prophets in Old Testament times, those raised by Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry, and those raised by the apostles after Jesus’ ascension.

Has anyone got any evidence that people can come back from the dead? Thanks.

Matthew is the only writer to mention the resurrection of these saints, unless this is the “first resurrection” mentioned in Revelation 20:4-6.

There are some places in Sacred Scripture that employ the image of rising from the dead in a figurative or spiritual sense. For instance, in Jesus’ parable of the Prodigal Son, when the father says, “This brother of yours was dead, and has come back to life” (Luke 15:32), he is speaking about his son in a figurative way; his son did not actually die. Also, in Colossians 2:12, when St. Paul says that, in baptism, Christians are buried with Christ and raised to life in him, he is speaking about a spiritual rebirth, not a physical death and resurrection.

However, most instances in Sacred Scripture that talk about someone rising from the dead are understood literally, someone really dead really came back to life again. For example, in the Old Testament, the widow’s son was really dead and the prophet Elijah really raised him from the dead. (1 Kings 17:22) During his lifetime, the prophet Elisha really raised another woman’s son from the dead (2 Kings 4:35) and, after his death, he really raised a man from the dead. (2 Kings 13:21) In the New Testament, besides really raising Lazarus from the dead (John 11:44), Jesus Christ also really raised Jairus’ daughter (Matthew 9:25, Mark 5:42, and Luke 8:55) and a widow’s son from the dead. (Luke 7:15) St. Peter really raised Tabitha from the dead (Acts 9:40) and St. Paul really raised Eutychus from the dead. (Acts 20:10)


#6

Papias, the Bishop of Hieropolis and an early Father of the Church, wrote a book (“Exposition of the Logia of the Lord”) that, sad to say, exists only in fragments and in references to his works in other, later authors. That’s really, really unfortunate, as Papias’s book would be one of our best sources on the origin of the Gospels. He was personally acquainted with the daughters of Philip (mentioned in Acts 21:8-9), from whom he gained most of his information about the events and writing of the Gospels. We’re not even sure exactly when Papias’s book was written, but some have suggested c. 130 A.D. Papias quoted 1 Peter and 1 John, and was familiar with the Book of Revelation, so the dating for this seems reasonable.

Papias collected the orthodox oral traditions (or as we would say, the Deposit of Faith) from those who had been around Jesus. He described his research technique thus:

I will not hesitate to add also for you to my interpretations what I formerly learned with care from the Presbyters and have carefully stored in memory, giving assurance of its truth. For I did not take pleasure as the many do in those who speak much, but in those who teach what is true, nor in those who relate foreign precepts, but in those who relate the precepts which were given by the Lord to the faith and came down from the Truth itself. And also if any follower of the Presbyters happened to come, I would inquire for the sayings of the Presbyters, what Andrew said, or what Peter said, or what Philip or what Thomas or James or what John or Matthew or any other of the Lord’s disciples, and for the things which other of the Lord’s disciples, and for the things which Aristion and the Presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, were saying. For I considered that I should not get so much advantage from matter in books as from the voice which yet lives and remains.

Irenaeus, later in the 2nd century, wrote that Papius was " “a hearer of John, and companion of Polycarp, a man of old time.” (Adversus Haereses V 33.4), so he seems to have been a good source.

The early 5th century writer Philip of Side, who apparently did have a copy of Papias’s book, wrote in "The History of the Church according to Philip of Side, codex Baroccianus 142 (Lightfoot-Holmes 5) that Papius wrote that those who were raised from the dead by Jesus survived to the reign of the Emperor Hadrian (circa 117-138 A.D.).

“Concerning those resurrected by Christ from the dead, that they lived until Hadrian.” ( και Παπιας δε περι την χιλιονταετηριδα σφαλλεται, εξ ου και ο Ειρηναιος.)

textexcavation.com/papias.html#fragment5

Eusebius also attributes a similar statement to Quadratus of Athens, another second-century author. This could be a corroborative statement, or Philip of Side may have confused Papias’s writing with that if Quadratus.

Eusebius wrote in his Ecclesiastical History, Book IV, chapter 3:

1. After Trajan had reigned for nineteen and a half years Ælius Adrian became his successor in the empire. To him Quadratus addressed a discourse containing an apology for our religion, because certain wicked men had attempted to trouble the Christians. The work is still in the hands of a great many of the brethren, as also in our own, and furnishes clear proofs of the man’s understanding and of his apostolic orthodoxy. 2. He himself reveals the early date at which he lived in the following words: But the works of our Saviour were always present, for they were genuine:— those that were healed, and those that were raised from the dead, who were seen not only when they were healed and when they were raised, but were also always present; and not merely while the Saviour was on earth, but also after his death, they were alive for quite a while, so that some of them lived even to our day. Such then was Quadratus.

newadvent.org/fathers/250104.htm

It’s not fully clear if Quadratus and/or Papius referred solely to those three people who are named in the Gospels that Jesus raised from the dead, pre-crucifixion (Lazarus, the 12-year old girl who died in bed, and the only son of the widow of Nain), or additionally to those who were raised from the dead after his crucifixion. So we have at least one, possibly two extra-Biblical sources suggesting that these post-crucifixion appearances were physical resurrections, not a metaphorical or merely spiritual, “ghost-like” appearances, but were resurrections (and quite long-lasting ones) on the nature of Lazarus.


Are future Bodily Resurrections plausible?
#7

What did Jesus do on Holy Saturday? He went to open the gates of Heaven to those who died. This could be talking about the rising of the souls of the saints into Heaven.

God Bless :tiphat:


#8

I take it literally.

My best guess is that to be recognized (appeared to many) as raised from the dead the Saints may have been recently deceased.

How else would they know they were raised from the dead if they weren’t recognized as once being dead or had died?

That’s my simple answer.

Thanks for the posts above referring to ECF writings which goes into greater detail and truth.:slight_smile:


#9

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