San Antonio man has engine that gets 100 mpg

#21

Jay Leno’s second season is extremely fun … and interesting.

WaYYYYY more people are building their own engines than I ever thought.

SOOOO … if a 100mpg engine is really possible, then the details should be published for all to see.

Otherwise, … we are talking about calumny or some similar false accusation.

#22

Do you really think the powers that be want many people finding out how to build a 100+mpg engine?

Im positive the big automakers COULD have come up a far more efficient means of propelling a car by now, but when everyone is obviously quite used to paying for fuel like they have been doing, why do something that would throw a wrench into the stream of cash?! I have wondered why they havent looked deeper in fuel vaporizing, that seems to be how so many of these shadetree DIY’ers are able to get triple digit mpg.

Its the same reason none of them have a vehicle that will last a persons lifetime, I really believe by now car engines could have more solid state mechanics, but again, people are used to paying for repairs and eventually buying a new car. this ‘system’ keeps a lot of industries afloat.

If people suddenly only had to fuel their vehicles once a month, that would topple our economy quickly, same thing if the average car lasted 30-40 years.

#23

Or you could go for a 1,000 mpg engine
fox13now.com/2013/06/11/car-built-by-byu-students-gets-more-than-1000-mpg/

#24

The September 2016 issue of “Kitplane” has a great article about engine design and construction.

So, YES, you CAN build an engine that will deliver whatever kind of performance you are looking for or are interested in.

It has NOTHING to do with the powers that be.

You can buy some machine tools and design and build your own engine(s).

Not rocket science.

Requires some competence.

But you can do it in your own basement/garage/work shed.

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#25

Yes, the powers that be would want to be the first to build one.

Im positive the big automakers COULD have come up a far more efficient means of propelling a car by now, but when everyone is obviously quite used to paying for fuel like they have been doing, why do something that would throw a wrench into the stream of cash?!

The automakers do not make more cash when people buy more gas. The oil companies do. Unless you believe both industries are controlled by the Illuminati or the Springfield Stonecutters, there is no reason to think automakers would risk someone else beating them to the market.

I have wondered why they havent looked deeper in fuel vaporizing, that seems to be how so many of these shadetree DIY’ers are able to get triple digit mpg.

It is easy to get triple digit MPG when powering a ultra-light vehicle at 25 miles per hour on a flat test track. The difficultly comes when you want to move a 2 ton minivan to soccer practice in a city with stop lights and hills. There are reasons why commercially available vehicles do not have such mileage, and it has nothing to do with conspiracies or incompetence.

Its the same reason none of them have a vehicle that will last a persons lifetime, I really believe by now car engines could have more solid state mechanics, but again, people are used to paying for repairs and eventually buying a new car. this ‘system’ keeps a lot of industries afloat.

Your inability to imagine reasons for why things are the way they are does not mean those reasons don’t exist. It means you need to look harder.

#26

Do you have any evidence that these home-built engines would deliver more mileage in cars that people would actually want to drive? There is no such thing as a 100 MPG engine without the context of what kind of vehicle it is built into and how it is used.

#27

A 100mpg engine … if it is possible at all … can be built in your home shop.

There is no such thing as “the powers that be” … or “a context”.

Engine design does not respond to linguistic manipulation nor to political correctness.

Nor is a giant factory needed.

You just built what you want in your basement or home shop.

#28

The “Context” I meant was the particular vehicle and driving conditions. An engine all by itself does not go anywhere. You won’t get and “miles” out of it for a gallon of gas. You will just get a certain amount of energy. How far in miles that energy will take you depends on the weight of the vehicle, how fast you want to go, whether the road is flat or rising, whether there are traffic lights. That is the context. No one disputes that a 100 mpg vehicle can be built. The question is if such a vehicle is practical, or is just a toy. As I said, try taking your kids to soccer practice in a 2 ton minivan powered by your “100 mpg engine”. It just ain’t going to happen.

#29

Yeah, I’ve had this discussion with my younger son, who is a chemist and a technical sales exec for a fuel additives company. The upper limit on what kind of mileage a gasoline-powered vehicle will get is set by the “energy value” of gasoline itself – how much energy is released when gasoline is burned. That’s why I wrote what I did back in post #8. The energy value of gasoline is too low to get 100 mpg in anything resembling a useful motor vehicle (as defined in #8), no matter how the engine is tweaked.

closed #30
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