Sanctus Sanctus Sanctus...My First Tridentine Mass!

To-day, I attended the Solemn High Mass and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on the Feast of Christ the King at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption.

It was breathtaking. I was, for two hours, in Heaven (in figurative language). The reverence was absolutely astonishing for one who has grown up in the era of irreverence. I loved that the only point in which you saw the Eucharistic Lord was when the priest held him up, direct after the Consecration. It made it all the more sacred, all the more special.

The music was perfect- no opportunity for abuse at all. We were blessed to have three priests concelebrating at the Mass, all ery devout.

The Basilica lacks a High Altar, as the tabernacle is a bit off-centre (but still in a place of prominence). They did a beautiful job modifying the freestanding altar to the point that it really didn’t matter.

I shall attend a TLM whenever possible, and I give thanks to God that He has allowed these rites to subsist in His Church.

For the record: we have the red books as well.

Bravo. I am glad you had such a wonderful experience!

The Tridentine Mass however is never concelebrated, by law it cannot be. The Tridentine Mass is bound by the rubrics of the 1962 Missal. What you saw was a Solemn Mass with Priest, Deacon and sub-deacon. Sometimes there are three priests, but the other two take the function of the deacon and sub-deacon.

An informative email newsgroup to subscribe to is very informative on the Tridentine Mass. groups.yahoo.com/group/ctngreg/

Ken
(My Parish - materecclesiae.org)

[quote=Servus Pio XII]To-day, I attended the Solemn High Mass and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on the Feast of Christ the King at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption.

It was breathtaking. I was, for two hours, in Heaven (in figurative language). The reverence was absolutely astonishing for one who has grown up in the era of irreverence. I loved that the only point in which you saw the Eucharistic Lord was when the priest held him up, direct after the Consecration. It made it all the more sacred, all the more special.

The music was perfect- no opportunity for abuse at all. We were blessed to have three priests concelebrating at the Mass, all ery devout.

The Basilica lacks a High Altar, as the tabernacle is a bit off-centre (but still in a place of prominence). They did a beautiful job modifying the freestanding altar to the point that it really didn’t matter.

I shall attend a TLM whenever possible, and I give thanks to God that He has allowed these rites to subsist in His Church.

For the record: we have the red books as well.
[/quote]

[quote=Servus Pio XII]To-day, I attended the Solemn High Mass and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on the Feast of Christ the King at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption.

It was breathtaking. I was, for two hours, in Heaven (in figurative language). The reverence was absolutely astonishing for one who has grown up in the era of irreverence. I loved that the only point in which you saw the Eucharistic Lord was when the priest held him up, direct after the Consecration. It made it all the more sacred, all the more special.

The music was perfect- no opportunity for abuse at all. We were blessed to have three priests concelebrating at the Mass, all ery devout.

The Basilica lacks a High Altar, as the tabernacle is a bit off-centre (but still in a place of prominence). They did a beautiful job modifying the freestanding altar to the point that it really didn’t matter.

I shall attend a TLM whenever possible, and I give thanks to God that He has allowed these rites to subsist in His Church.

For the record: we have the red books as well.
[/quote]

That is pretty much how I felt at my first High Tridentine Mass. On a side note, worship according to the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom at a Byzantine Catholic Church sometime. I think you might enjoy it just as much.

[quote=kleary]Bravo. I am glad you had such a wonderful experience!

The Tridentine Mass however is never concelebrated, by law it cannot be. The Tridentine Mass is bound by the rubrics of the 1962 Missal. What you saw was a Solemn Mass with Priest, Deacon and sub-deacon. Sometimes there are three priests, but the other two take the function of the deacon and sub-deacon.

An informative email newsgroup to subscribe to is very informative on the Tridentine Mass. groups.yahoo.com/group/ctngreg/

Ken
(My Parish - materecclesiae.org)")
[/quote]

You don’t suppose what Servus attended was the Missal of 1965? It is much closer to the Tridentine Rite then to the current Novus Ordo Rite.

[quote=Servus Pio XII]To-day, I attended the Solemn High Mass and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on the Feast of Christ the King at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption.

It was breathtaking. I was, for two hours, in Heaven (in figurative language). The reverence was absolutely astonishing for one who has grown up in the era of irreverence. I loved that the only point in which you saw the Eucharistic Lord was when the priest held him up, direct after the Consecration. It made it all the more sacred, all the more special.

The music was perfect- no opportunity for abuse at all. We were blessed to have three priests concelebrating at the Mass, all ery devout.

The Basilica lacks a High Altar, as the tabernacle is a bit off-centre (but still in a place of prominence). They did a beautiful job modifying the freestanding altar to the point that it really didn’t matter.

I shall attend a TLM whenever possible, and I give thanks to God that He has allowed these rites to subsist in His Church.

For the record: we have the red books as well.
[/quote]

Hey, do you live in Covington?? I’ve heard the Basilica up there is beautiful and from the pictures I’ve seen, it looks stunning. I’d love to attend the Tridentine Mass there sometime soon.
I attend the Latin Mass almost every Sunday in Lexington.
Is this where you went? . . .

Wow.

Unfortunately, we in BC only have one church that serves High Sung Mass, and I would have to take bus to go there (meaning that I would have to spend money). The church is a small church that fits about 20 or so of the community believers of the TLM.

But when I went there, I was very much surprised (and late). I cam in when they were incensing the place, and I was definitely surprised on how much reverence, awe and mystery was created through the sung Latin and the usage of all senses for worship.

I distinctly remember how beautiful the incense rose up before the altar into the ceiling where a window opened out the sunlight. I was in awe on how that worship was SOOO evocative and reminiscent of Jewish worship.

I really do hope that we have more of this TLM here. It is so beautiful, and I would rather partake of that than this Novus Ordo.

Indeed the Novus Ordo is a blessing for many. But where’s the incense, the smells and the bells? :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote=silverwings_88]Indeed the Novus Ordo is a blessing for many. But where’s the incense, the smells and the bells? :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

Just to be clear, it’s quite possible to have a “smells and bells” Novus Ordo. We do it here at Ave Maria University every Sunday. Ad Orientem, Latin, the entire Mass sung in chant and polyphony, incense, bells, the whole thing.

I have attended low mass several times and tomorrow will be my first high mass for All Saints…can’t wait.

BTW, we have a whole PARISH in my diocese staffed by the FSSP. It is about 30 minutes away though, so I still go to my local church…but that might change

Steve

[quote=Psalm45:9]You don’t suppose what Servus attended was the Missal of 1965? It is much closer to the Tridentine Rite then to the current Novus Ordo Rite.
[/quote]

The Indult does not allow for the use of the 1965 Missal. Only the Roman Missal 1962 edition is allowed.

Ken

Hey, do you live in Covington?? I’ve heard the Basilica up there is beautiful and from the pictures I’ve seen, it looks stunning. I’d love to attend the Tridentine Mass there sometime soon.
I attend the Latin Mass almost every Sunday in Lexington.
Is this where you went? . . .

Nearby, in one of the towns about 20 or so minutes from there. That would be the basilica. The Solemn High Mass was absolutely beautiful!!!

The thing that stuck out was thus: I walked into the magnificent Basilica, and, instead of hearing the small choir of our parish singing “Wade in the Water” I heard Roman Catholicism at it’s finest; all present were praying a Rosary. THAT is the Church of the Apostles, no matter what any liberals will tell you about “community”. THAT is what one should hear upon entering a Roman Catholic Church.

You don’t suppose what Servus attended was the Missal of 1965? It is much closer to the Tridentine Rite then to the current Novus Ordo Rite.

No, according to the schedule, it was “Tridentine”.

The Tridentine Mass however is never concelebrated, by law it cannot be. The Tridentine Mass is bound by the rubrics of the 1962 Missal. What you saw was a Solemn Mass with Priest, Deacon and sub-deacon. Sometimes there are three priests, but the other two take the function of the deacon and sub-deacon.

My mistake…whoops :o

[quote=VociMike]Just to be clear, it’s quite possible to have a “smells and bells” Novus Ordo. We do it here at Ave Maria University every Sunday. Ad Orientem, Latin, the entire Mass sung in chant and polyphony, incense, bells, the whole thing.
[/quote]

This is very true. But…what’s the point then?

I mean, what’s the point of celebrating the new Mass in this manner? Doesn’t that kind of negate the whole purpose of the “reform” (or “renewal” if you prefer)?

Using the 1962 Missal as the baseline, I can tell you what changes I would’ve made to the Mass if I was Pope and, I can assure you, it wouldn’t have looked very much like the Mass of Paul VI. But that’s probably why I’ve never been elected Pope. :frowning:

[quote=VociMike]Just to be clear, it’s quite possible to have a “smells and bells” Novus Ordo. We do it here at Ave Maria University every Sunday. Ad Orientem, Latin, the entire Mass sung in chant and polyphony, incense, bells, the whole thing.
[/quote]

The difference is that the Tridentine Mass doesn’t even need smells and bells and music to be solemn and beautiful. A daily Low Mass celebrated in the Tridentine Rite is even more magnificient and heavenly than a Novus Ordo celebrated EWTN-style. Without Latin and all the smells and bells, the Novus Ordo doesn’t look very . . .well . . Catholic. The TLM is profoundly Catholic either way, with its distinction between priest and people, abundant references to sacrifice, the Real Presence, and the saints, etc. I’m glad the Novus Ordo can be celebrated to look like the TLM but NO masses celebrated like this are even rarer than indult TLMs. There are a few points where the Novus Ordo does a better job than the TLM, but when you compare them together, the TLM is far superior!

[quote=slewi]I have attended low mass several times and tomorrow will be my first high mass for All Saints…can’t wait.

BTW, we have a whole PARISH in my diocese staffed by the FSSP. It is about 30 minutes away though, so I still go to my local church…but that might change

Steve
[/quote]

I am very sad that in my parish the Solemnity for All Saints was celebrated in a low mass that last for 45 minutes only.

I dont know why some priest do such things.

[quote=VociMike]Just to be clear, it’s quite possible to have a “smells and bells” Novus Ordo. We do it here at Ave Maria University every Sunday. Ad Orientem, Latin, the entire Mass sung in chant and polyphony, incense, bells, the whole thing.
[/quote]

I would like to see that! o_o

That would be a wonderful experience to see which I haven’t seen in my lifetime yet; a reverent Novus Ordo :P.

[quote=Servus Pio XII]The thing that stuck out was thus: I walked into the magnificent Basilica, and, instead of hearing the small choir of our parish singing “Wade in the Water” I heard Roman Catholicism at it’s finest; all present were praying a Rosary. THAT is the Church of the Apostles, no matter what any liberals will tell you about “community”. THAT is what one should hear upon entering a Roman Catholic Church.
[/quote]

I’m also from the Covington diocese. “Wade in the Water” was very popular in my old parish, it was sung at every baptism. You wouldn’t happen to live in Union?

[quote=Psalm45:9]That is pretty much how I felt at my first High Tridentine Mass. On a side note, worship according to the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom at a Byzantine Catholic Church sometime. I think you might enjoy it just as much.
[/quote]

I would find it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to worship at a Byzantine Divine Liturgy.

They don’t usually kneel there, and kneeling is so much a part of who I am, that I would be in absolute agony, seeing everyone standing. I find it difficult to endure a Novus Ordo Mass with all of the standing(I kneel anyway), but at least at Novus Ordo, there are still some parts where the congregation kneels.

And it would probably be very difficult to find a Byzantine Divine Liturgy that is not said in the vernacular. The Eastern Catholics have been HEAVILY Novus Ordo-ised, and not just by having their liturgies in the vernacular. The tradition of women covering their heads at Divine liturgy has almost disappeared in Eastern Catholic Churches.:frowning:

Not every Latin Rite Catholic would want to worship at a place that is so completely different.

So many of the things that Tridentine Mass devotees fight for are not present in the modern Eastern Rites.

Could we have some examples of

The Eastern Catholics have been HEAVILY Novus Ordo-ised, and not just by having their liturgies in the vernacular.

please ?

Most of the EC Churches I know about are doing as they have been told and returning to their traditional Liturgy.

It is perfectly possible to attend a Service where English is used - and equally it is perfectly possible to find a Liturgy in eg , as I am a member of the UGCC , Ukrainian. Myself I have only once been at a Liturgy where English was used .

[quote=wannabee]Could we have some examples of
please ?

Most of the EC Churches I know about are doing as they have been told and returning to their traditional Liturgy.

It is perfectly possible to attend a Service where English is used - and equally it is perfectly possible to find a Liturgy in eg , as I am a member of the UGCC , Ukrainian. Myself I have only once been at a Liturgy where English was used .
[/quote]

Women not covering their heads.

And as for the Ukrainian Greek Catholics, there are charismatics among them in Ukraine.:frowning: I am not sure about the Ukrainian Greek Catholics outside of Ukraine.

And many of the Eastern Catholics have been unnecessarily influenced by the Orthodox, sometimes to the point where the ECs try to be as Orthodox(with a capital O) as possible, and do not care much about being Catholic.

I went to a Tridentine mass this weekend. Unfortunately, since my diocese is so liberal, it is the only one my Bishop begrudgingly allows. Furthermore, it is very poorly celbrated. I really hope for the day when I can visit the east coast and experience the grandeur of the Tridentine rite the way it was supposed to be celebrated.

Dearie dearie me :frowning:

Have you ever looked at the text of the Divine Liturgy in English ? Have you counted the number of times the Holy Father is mentioned ? How often is the Holy Father mentioned during Mass ?

His Holiness John Paul II has told us to see we return to our roots - this we are doing .

If you compare the text of the Divine Liturgy of our Father among the Saints , John Chrysostom as used in the EC Churches and the Orthodox Christian Churches you will find that the only real difference between Orthodox DL and Catholic DL is the Commemoration of the Holy Father and of course the names of our Hierarchs.

Now please let’s not have any more of this triumphalist attitude that Latin Catholics are the only real Catholics .

Head coverings - the only Orthodox Christians that I know that insist on it are those from ROCOR and the Old Rite folk - and there BTW the women stand yes stand] on opposite sides of the Church.

Kneeling is penitential , so on a Sunday - the day of the Resurrection - we rejoice ,and you cannot rejoice on your knees.

Now come on - let’s have no more of this we are better than you stuff - we are equal in the eyes of God

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