Sarah Palin talks waterboarding, guns at NRA convention


#1

cbsnews.com/news/sarah-palin-talks-waterboarding-guns-at-nra-convention/

“Well, if I were in charge,” she continued, as the audience erupted in applause at the prospect, “they would know that waterboarding is how we baptize terrorists.”

LOVE! :heart:


#2

I’m glad she is not in charge.


#3

No kiddin’.


#4

I would take her over the President any day of the week. If waterboarding is so evil, then what does that say about the current President who executes American citizens without due process through drone strikes.

This is why there is the divide between people in the US because if you think that waterboarding is wrong because its wrong then surely you have to condemn Pres. Obama for executing American citizens without due process through drone strikes. Wrong is wrong no matter the political party that is in control. Sadly some people don’t understand this.


#5

In regard to ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ (AKA another KIND of torture) it is blasphemous to use baptism for the sake of a one liner…

Republicans won’t denounce that UnCHRISTIAN rhetoric because it supports the pro war agenda
*
“oh but they’re terrorists”*
the current American foreign policy of both parties is big con game against Christian ethics.

In his encyclical letter “The Splendor of Truth” (“Veritatis Splendor”), Pope John Paul II indicated that we cannot make moral exceptions and perform “intrinsically evil” acts,** even when our intentions may be good. He noted the Second Vatican Council’s absolute rejection of intrinsically evil acts that “infect human civilization and contaminate those who inflict them.” U.S. culture sometimes fails to grasp the insidious nature of intrinsic evil. It has not understood the corrosive effect of the acceptance of torture, abortion and other such acts on U.S. society. **

The church’s contemporary prohibition of torture reflects a deep understanding of the human person and a profound vision of human society. In 1998 Pope John Paul II offered a reflection on the Shroud of Turin in which he connected the suffering of Christ to the inhumanity of torture. Pope John Paul said: “The imprint left by the tortured body of the Crucified One, which attests to the tremendous human capacity for causing pain and death to one’s fellow man, stands as an icon of the suffering of the innocent in every age: of the countless tragedies that have marked past history and the dramas that continue to unfold in the world.” The pope went on to ask: “How can we not recall with dismay and pity those who do not enjoy basic civil rights, the victims of torture and terrorism, the slaves of criminal organizations?”

nrcat.org/catholic-resources/catholic-responses-to-torture


#6

Most Democrats are hypocrites, who put cult of personality and party over principles. The anti-war groups all of a sudden disappeared after Bush left office, even though Obama adopted most of Bush’s War on Terror policies and never closed down Guantanomo bay. Not all people who identify as liberals have abandoned their criticism, as they have rejected Obama denoting it as " Bush’s third term" but the news coverage went away from anti-war rhetoric once the Republican left office.

If A Republican were president, the Democrat Operatives would DISCUSS the ETHICS of Drone Strikes and the distance involved that dehumanizes actual HUMAN BEINGS…every week, not because they believed in it, but because it makes for good copy and political capital for future candidates – but because it does a disservice to their man, they keep it muted.

Instead we have the president joking about Drone striking individuals at WH Correspondence Dinners. :rolleyes:

Both the parties exploit the sincerity of those wanting to take a stand.


#7

She sounds sick and hateful :frowning:


#8

First, we’re supposed to care what Sarah Palin thinks…why, exactly?

Second, here’s what is truly revealing. Palin in the past has denied that waterboarding is torture, yet here, she is citing baptism as something “we” do to terrorists that they would find, to say the least, unpleasant, and would, in this context, constitute torture.

Baptism is a Sacrament. To see it mentioned in this context is despicable. She needs to apologize for this vicious remark.


#9

I’m glad she’s not in charge

If she were in charge, this country would be SO much better off, NO QUESTION.

Barack Obama Administration = FAIL.


#10

=gnjsdad;11939078]First, we’re supposed to care what Sarah Palin thinks…why, exactly?

If people do not care, why are they on this thread making comments?

Second, here’s what is truly revealing. Palin in the past has denied that waterboarding is torture, yet here, she is citing baptism as something “we” do to terrorists that they would find, to say the least, unpleasant, and would, in this context, constitute torture.

That’s a good reason why these kinds of things should not be said.

Baptism is a Sacrament. To see it mentioned in this context is despicable. She needs to apologize for this vicious remark.

Maybe she should, but for what reason? She doesn’t agree with certain people politically, or because a Sacrament isn’t a joke.

I can tell the answer from this comment :rolleyes:


#11

What about this:

townhall.com/columnists/johnhawkins/2010/03/30/violent_liberal_hate_rhetoric_fifteen_quotes/page/full


#12

That sounds sick and hateful…

I like her. She stands up for her beliefs. She has five kids, incl one with down syndrome. She was born Catholic. She’s rural… not from either coast… or inside the beltway…

This was obviously a play on words and a sound bite. I’m sure she didn’t mean it literally. However, waterboarding is not intrinsically evil. Done correctly it is safe and effective. On the other hand, I think most terrorists are intrinsically evil. She can be a sounding board for others because she knows she has no real political future at least not in the current environment or in the foreseeable future. So she can say things to try to move the target audience directionally. Not necessarily meaning whatever is specifically said.

Politics is hard for women. If they are tough they are a ‘butch’ but if they are nice and soft they are labeled ‘ditsy’. And it seems to me that women are especially hard on successful, opinionated, outspoken women. I think it’s a shame. I think there is some ‘envy’ in there somewhere. I think more women, especially Catholic women should support her. It’s not a vote. She’s not running for anything. She’s just working. Trying to carry the ball down the field.


#13

In regard to ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ (AKA another KIND of torture) it is blasphemous to use baptism for the sake of a one liner…

What about “kinetic action”?

Republicans won’t denounce that UnCHRISTIAN rhetoric

Not sure if I want to be called a republican, but those comments do not sit well with me.

because it supports the pro war agenda

:ehh:

Here’s a list of wars democrats got us involved in:

World War I
World War II
Korea
Vietnam
Bay of Pigs
Bosnia
Somalia
Amended War Powers Act for Bush
Libya

:stretcher:


#14

Let’s see which party is this person in? My party, ok we’ll I don’t agree with the comments but look at what people in the other party do. O wait the person isn’t in my political party. What an evil evil person. Political parties are irrelevant in this discussion.

Americanism is too often found masquerading as Christianity. Water boarding is torture and torture is a violation of a person’s God-given dignity. The problem with this isn’t the individual making these comments. It’s the fact that so many people, many of them Christians, cheer statements like this. I wonder if Jesus would water board his enemies.


#15

How can any of these italicized traits make a person likable? I don’t see how any of them amount to accomplishments. Just seem like odd reasons to like a person/

This was obviously a play on words and a sound bite. I’m sure she didn’t mean it literally. However, waterboarding is not intrinsically evil. Done correctly it is safe and effective. On the other hand, I think most terrorists are intrinsically evil. She can be a sounding board for others because she knows she has no real political future at least not in the current environment or in the foreseeable future. So she can say things to try to move the target audience directionally. Not necessarily meaning whatever is specifically said.

  1. People are not intrinsically evil. The things they do (like water-boarding and other torture for example) can be, however. And what magnifies the evil of torture, what makes Palin’s remarks utterly and completely destroy her credibility, is that such techniques are most often used on people who have not been convicted of a crime, and given that even judges and juries make enough mistakes in trial verdicts, I am certain that it’s only a matter of time before someone who doesn’t even get a jury trial or a lawyer ends up being tortured when they didn’t do anything wrong. Or am I to trust that military personnel would make extra extra sure that the person they’re torturing really is a “terrorist” (which as many Americans define the word can mean as little as having thrown a rock at someone) before they go through with it? No, I think instead I’ll put my faith in the rule of law and the inalienable rights of human beings. So I would say waterboarding is in fact evil.

Politics is hard for women. If they are tough they are a ‘butch’ but if they are nice and soft they are labeled ‘ditsy’. And it seems to me that women are especially hard on successful, opinionated, outspoken women. I think it’s a shame. I think there is some ‘envy’ in there somewhere. I think more women, especially Catholic women should support her. It’s not a vote. She’s not running for anything. She’s just working. Trying to carry the ball down the field.

As I see it, sometimes the opposite is the case: sometimes women get treated with kid gloves because most men don’t want to be seen as attacking a woman. Case in point, Sarah Palin and Sandra Fluke each largely became celebrities in their own camps by doing little else but being called mean names by people who disagreed with them. The ‘victim card’ tends not to work as well for grown men. And I’m quite glad she’s not running for anything if these are indeed her views.


#16

=NormW;11939387]Let’s see which party is this person in? My party, ok we’ll I don’t agree with the comments but look at what people in the other party do. O wait the person isn’t in my political party. What an evil evil person. Political parties are irrelevant in this discussion.

Sometimes one needs to look at how posts materialize and why. Some folks are so eager to discredit the party opposite they’ll hit up anything they can.

I’ll give points for recognizing the style, but if there’s a liberal post doing that, it’s fair game for a conservative response exposing double standards and/or hypocrisy.

There’s a lot of subtle communication on here. New members would be wise to get used to it. :smiley: :thumbsup:

Americanism is too often found masquerading as Christianity. Water boarding is torture and torture is a violation of a person’s God-given dignity. The problem with this isn’t the individual making these comments.

I really cannot speak to the Catholic morality of waterboarding. :nope:

It’s the fact that so many people, many of them Christians, cheer statements like this. I wonder if Jesus would water board his enemies.

That is a great point.

I didn’t like the comments. I like Sarah Palin, but not the comments, Overboard on the red meat.


#17

Forgive me, I did not mean to Impugn Democrat or Republican individuals on here.

When I used the word Republicans , I meant PUBLIC heads, office holders and the GOP chairpersons, etc.

As for that LIST, it is naive to think the American political factions are the only powerful influence in determining what pulls America into Wars.
President Eisenhower touched upon one aspect regarding the Military Industrial Complex.


#18

I like Sarah Palin a great deal at first. Since then, I have concluded that she is a bit of a light weight - which still puts her way ahead of Obama and Biden. Still, a Sarah Palin thread started these days is usually a field day for those who dislike her a great deal and get all worked up about the things she says - then somehow they say “why do we care what she thinks” :shrug: She has become a lightning rod for criticism. Strange that Catholics would reserve their harshest criticism for someone who has raised a family with five kids - one with Down’s syndrome - whose words and deeds in favor of the unborn are very, very powerful. But no matter, she is “vicious” and “unchristian” . Right. :confused: Palin is a great example of the hypocrisy of feminism: she is a powerful, outspoken women who has accomplished much - yet, she is criticized by feminists because she is conservative.

Ishii


#19

My comment was in response to the news article in the OP. As far as I’m concerned, Sarah Palin as a public figure ought to be an irrelevancy, since she will never again hold public office. But if they insist on making news out of the things she says, then I will not back down from commenting when she says ridiculous things like “waterboarding is how we baptize terrorists”.


#20

I have heard the phrase “baptism by fire” - used to describe someone who is thrown into a situation and has to “sink or swim.” Is that despicable? I think the criticism of Palin is way overwrought. If you don’t care what she thinks or says, then why are you commenting? Sounds to me like you care a great deal. It is amusing to see how liberals get all worked up about an “irrelevant figure” like Sarah Palin. Would that they get similarly worked up about the actions of our current president and his anti-Catholic, anti-Christian policies. Oh, wait - he’s a Democrat so its okay.

Ishii


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