Saturated fat DOESN’T cause heart disease after all: Scientists say foods such as butter have been unfairly demonised


#1

dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2582867/Saturated-fat-DOESNT-cause-heart-disease-all.html

[LIST]Guidelines urging people to avoid fat to stave off heart disease ‘are wrong’
*]There is no evidence of a link between saturated fat and heart disease
*]Healthy polyunsaturated fats also do not reduce heart disease risk
*]A dairy fat ‘significantly reduces’ heart disease risk[/LIST]

Thoughts?

I for one have never believed saturated fat is bad, I use lard for frying and baking, I use butter for baking too and for sandwiches and I love suet dumplings and puddings. Also beef fat makes great chips (French fries) :smiley: Fat on steaks? chicken skin? I eat it all.


#2

its TRANS FATS that are dangerous - known as Partially Hydrogenated Oils here in the United States.

There are good fats and there are bad fats.


#3

I am not a nutritionist or cardiologist. But I have often wondered if this doesn’t vary from person to person, or perhaps from ethnic group to ethnic group.

It’s a fact that Indo-Europeans are the only people on earth, the majority of whom retain lactose tolerance into adulthood. Almost nobody else does.

Why would that be? Well, Indo-Europeans were herders on the Eurasian plains for millenia. There isn’t much to eat there at all other than the products of herds; meat, milk and the things one can make out of milk. And for those who migrated into northern Europe, it would have been the same meat and milk heavy diets.

If one was lactose intolerant, one did not live to pass on one’s genes. Might it be true as well of meat and milk products? But if it is, it might not mean that anybody else can well tolerate such products.

I don’t know who were the subjects of this study. If it was a Brit study, using Brit subjects, it might not tell anything useful to a Southeast Asian or one of Amerind extraction. In fact, it might be dangerously misleading to them.


#4

I’ve been eating butter all my life.
It’s natural.
I can’t stand margarine.
Don’t want artificial chemicals
and prefer the taste of butter.
It’s all about
good things in moderation.

As for chicken skin,
I used to eat it and love it.
Now I think it’s disgusting.

Fatty rib-eye steaks
I can enjoy.


#5

Coconut oil is best.


#6

Any fat can be bad in the presence of high blood sugar. Almost all obesity is from overconsumption of carbohydrates, and most specifically sugar and grain based products. Get rid of those or sharply limit them in your diet, and you will find that fat does not make you fat. I won’t go into what its done for me because this is not a fitness forum, but I will say that I will never go back to the typical high carb American diet.


#7

My dad was dxed decades ago with heart disease and my parents have been eating restricted diets ever since (ok, my mom cheated a bit ;)). Few eggs, no butter, no salt, non-fat meat, etc.

Tricky…


#8

This week it is good for you. The study coming out next week will say its bad for you again!


#9

:smiley: Isn’t that the truth!


#10

Saturated fats are necessary for preserving the strength and integrity of our blood vessels.

Common sense alert! As if it’s needed… in moderation.


#11

They could have saved much money on this study by simply reading the Rule of St. Benedict: “All things are to be done with moderation.”


#12

:slight_smile: :rotfl: :thumbsup:


#13

I would say they finally have it right. Here is a little basic biology: Fats can enter your blood stream only in the presence of carbohydrates. (Sugar, sugar, sugar is what makes people fat, as well as bread, pasta, grains…carbs make you fat.)

As another poster indicated there are good and bad fats. Add some moderation to this and a lot of people would solve their weight problems. In my family if we eat even one sandwich with bread we will never lose weight. But if we eat fresh fruit and veggies, high protein meats (yes with the fat) we lose weight like melting lard in a hot pan.

I refuse to use margarine, as it is made in part by some sort of plastic. Butter, dairy products and things like almond oil, peanut oil, olive oil and some corn oil do us just fine. Oh, and of course butter lard…good ole beef lard. My cholesterol, triglycerides and lipids are all normal as they can be.

One thing that will help of us in the US or other countries that allow it: is the discontinued use of steroids and growth hormones in our meat supply. Steroids are only used to “FATTEN” the animal up, same with the growth hormones. So why are we so surprised at the fat problem in this country? Also, steroids can cause aggressive behavior and depression.

Here is something to think about: My sister worked on some of the largest Cattle Ranches in this country. FYI: The ranchers and staff DO NOT eat the animals that are sold to the general public. They select out their own pigs, sheep, cows, and chickens and raise them separately. They don’t feed them the “com-biotics”, steroids and growth hormones. That is the stuff they eat. Every wonder why?


#14

Including the hemina of wine each day :wink:


#15

Diets are so complicated!

What bothers me is the genetically modified stuff. They say it’s safe, but the studies have not been done to back up those claims. Besides that, there are moral questions about that.

It’s so difficult to avoid GMO food, though because it’s not labeled in the US. High fructose corn syrup comes from corn that has been genetically modified, so I limit my intake of GMO food by never buying anything with high fructose corn syrup.


#16

Wasn’t Hermina the girl from the Harry Potter movies? :slight_smile:


#17

About a year ago I heard a cardiologist speak on this on a popular TV show. He said that fats are NOT the cause of heart disease, and the proof is in the fact that the rate of heart disease in western countries has not decreased one iota since the advent of low fat diets and cholesterol-reducing drugs. The cause, he said, was inflammation, which causes damage to the lining of the arteries. This, apparently is being borne out by the latest research. Fats should be eaten like everything else-in moderation. There is no need to go on a low-fat diet, per this cardiologist. The key, he said, is to eat a variety of foods, esp. fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and moderate EXERCISE. People need to get off their butts.

I think that cardiologists have been questioning the theory that saturated fats cause heart disease for a while now, but lipid-lowering drugs are a big buck industry. The pharmaceutical industry is not going to buy into this.

One thing my doctor told me is that exercise is the key, but it does not have to be sustained vigorous exercise. He said a hormone is released after about 20 minutes of sustained walking which contributes to keeping the lining of the arteries smooth.

It is going to be very interesting to see what develops in the next few years. Meanwhile, I will enjoy my poached eggs with buttered toast in the am.


#18

You’re arguing a totally different thing though. You’re just taking about obesity, not heart disease. Heart disease isn’t limited to fat people. I’ve spent the last 20 years dealing with my husbands heart disease, he’s had 2 bypass surgeries, numerous heart attacks, and numerous hospitalizations. Walking up and down cardiac wards in hospitals in different states has shown me that most of the patients there aren’t fat. Ironically, I’m the fat one and this month I had a battery of tests and showed that not only am I not diabetic, my heart is fine too.

Additionally Dr Ornish has done studies that show the opposite of what you claim. He has reversed heart disease in patients with it by putting them on a vegan diet.

Clearly there is a lot to learn about heart disease still.


#19

I was not arguing anything at all. :slight_smile:


#20

So then what was the point of your rant on obesity and carbs in this thread where the subject is heart disease?


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