SAUDI ARABIA - Saudi Arabia uses iron fist to quell migrant workers unrest [AN]


#1

Approximately 23,000 Ethiopian workers hand themselves into police custody after five deaths and hundreds of arrests. Clashes began in Riyadh after police begin detaining illegal immigrants. Some 2 million foreigners are expected to leave.

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#2

Hmm, does this mean that the Saudis will have to start doing some of their own work? Rather than having foreign "slaves" do it for them? That should be an eye-opener.


#3

Their government does have the right to crack down on illegal immigration just the same as any government, such as the United State’s government, does. However, I would hope that they would exercise some restraint and some mercy in their dealings.


#4

According to the article, that is indeed the reason for cracking down on illegal immigrants. Should be very interesting indeed.


#5

I didn’t actually read the article, so I missed the part about their being illegals. Yes, crackdowns would be in order. One could wish that the crackdown were a little gentler.


#6

…The government wants to have companies hire at least one Saudi per ten foreigners - too often foreigners are preferred by Saudi employers because they can be kept in quasi slave conditions.

From what I understand, many Saudis are paid handsomely by the royals just for the fact that they are Saudis. Foreigners tend to do the work, with Westerners doing the higher paid skill work, and third world doing the drudgery at rock bottom prices.

There is not a lot of incentive for the locals to work when all their needs are being met.


#7

That is incredibly sad. So it seems that basically they have legalized slavery to me. Would that be an accurate approximation?

That said, I have heard that the United Arab Emirates has a similar thing going on where third world workers come to work there and get paid wages that are not fit for homeless people. Its disgusting.

Part of a just society is people getting a just wage. It does not matter if they are from third world countries or not, all people deserve a just wage. Otherwise, how else will they support themselves and their families?


#8

[quote="Darryl1958, post:6, topic:345310"]
From what I understand, many Saudis are paid handsomely by the royals just for the fact that they are Saudis. Foreigners tend to do the work, with Westerners doing the higher paid skill work, and third world doing the drudgery at rock bottom prices.

There is not a lot of incentive for the locals to work when all their needs are being met.

[/quote]

Yeah, trained Westerners can make big bucks in certain jobs, if they can stand the social conditions.


#9

[quote="Holly3278, post:7, topic:345310"]
That said, I have heard that the United Arab Emirates has a similar thing going on where third world workers come to work there and get paid wages that are not fit for homeless people. Its disgusting.

Part of a just society is people getting a just wage. It does not matter if they are from third world countries or not, all people deserve a just wage. Otherwise, how else will they support themselves and their families?

[/quote]

Yes and no. In many cases although they are paid a low wage in the country where they are working, when it is sent back to their home country it is a sizeable sum. Many lowly paid workers are educating siblings and children at a distance. Not that I'm defending the practise of paying very low wages. Also it depends on who they are working for - some are paid and treated well.....while others, well those are the horror stories.

There are fields where Westerners are now at a disadvantage as there are equally well qualified people from the east who will do certain jobs for less that a Westerner, or for less than a company feels they ought to pay a Westerner.


#10

Actual slavery and the outright owning of people was still legal in Saudi Arabia up to 1960, plus or minus a year or two. There was a certain amount of modernizing that took place around that time, until the religious police took over in 1979.
Humanitarian considerations do not seem to be a big concern for Wahhabism.


#11

Oh wow. That is really sad. I did not know that they had actual slavery until that time. From what I understand, Islam actually allows for slavery. Its pretty sad. I could be wrong on them allowing slavery though.

That said, I agree with you concerning humanitarian considerations and Wahhabism. They really don’t seem to have much of a humanitarian side in Saudi Arabia which is a place where Wahhabism is widely practiced. After all, a woman can be stoned to death for being a victim of rape. To me, that is disgusting.


#12

[quote="Darryl1958, post:10, topic:345310"]
Actual slavery and the outright owning of people was still legal in Saudi Arabia up to 1960, plus or minus a year or two. There was a certain amount of modernizing that took place around that time, until the religious police took over in 1979.
Humanitarian considerations do not seem to be a big concern for Wahhabism.

[/quote]

And slavery still exists de facto among Saudis, both in and out of the country, to this day. How many time a year do we have news stories of Saudi citizens being arrested, even here in the U.S., for holding people in involuntary servitude?


#13

[quote="DaveBj, post:12, topic:345310"]
And slavery still exists de facto among Saudis, both in and out of the country, to this day. How many time a year do we have news stories of Saudi citizens being arrested, even here in the U.S., for holding people in involuntary servitude?

[/quote]

Yes, I have heard about some of those stories.

Slavery has been the norm throughout human history. It is a modern phenomenon that the Western world universally abhors slavery, and that civilization has brought most of the world along with it in this abhorrence.

To the extent that Wahhabism and Islamist movements abhor the West and look to a sixth century code of conduct for guidance, there is not any sense of moral abhorrence for certain cultures in the world towards slavery.

And make no doubt about it, there are racist connotations to what is happening in Saudi Arabia too, in terms of who is esteemed and who is deemed fit for drudge work.

Slavery in the American South was not the exception. It was the rule for most of the world for most of history. It was the sheer bloodiness of the Civil War that made the fight against slavery a moral imperative.


#14

[quote="Holly3278, post:11, topic:345310"]
Oh wow. That is really sad. I did not know that they had actual slavery until that time. From what I understand, Islam actually allows for slavery. Its pretty sad. I could be wrong on them allowing slavery though.

That said, I agree with you concerning humanitarian considerations and Wahhabism. They really don't seem to have much of a humanitarian side in Saudi Arabia which is a place where Wahhabism is widely practiced. After all, a woman can be stoned to death for being a victim of rape. To me, that is disgusting.

[/quote]

When the so-called civil rights activist Malcolm X went to Saudi Arabia and converted to Islam slavery was still legal there. And yes in Islam you are allowed to have slaves, Mohammad himself had blacks slaves. Muslims also started the African slave trade on the basis that they are inferior


#15

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