Saudi Arabia's women voting for first time


#1
  • Saudi Arabia is going to the polls in unprecedented municipal elections in which women can cast a ballot for the first time.*

bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35075702

Prior to King Abdullah passing away, the King called on improved rights for women as well as appointing 30 women to the countries top advisory Shura council. In a country where women can not drive, this is IMO positive news. I have been aware of the many Saudis on social media and other outlets whom have spoken up in favor of improved rights for Saudis.

I truly feel happy for the Saudi women whom have taken to sites like facebook to proudly tell the world that they voted.

youtube.com/watch?v=07XewXLLHxE

I also find that this is great news in general for womens rights. According to the worldbank women make up a small percentage(23%) of elected officials worldwide.


#2

Oh fgs. Women want to produce children and have families. This third wave feminism insanity is part of the globalist agenda to reduce the population which is crazy and counter productive when you consider what Germany have done to “backfill” their dwindling numbers.

As for the House of Saud, they are truly desperate to present a positive image but that’s all it is. How many executions have been given a temporary stay recently? Check out behind the scenes and you’ll find they’re as brutal as they always were. Nope. I’m not buying what they’re presenting because the women who voted were covered head to toe.
I’m not naive


#3

One step at a time and even at this time, it seems like a minority of women are voting if one reads the BBC article or others on the web: middleeasteye.net/news/saudi-holds-first-ever-election-open-women-1307946930

At a male polling centre in central Riyadh, Ahmad Soulaybi, 78, said he did not know enough about female candidates in his region to support any.

This makes it sound like even the polling centers are somewhat segregated. Need we remind ourselves, I gather women did not always have the right to vote in the USA neither.

I try to read various news sources on all of these countries because I think diabolical assertions are said about all countries because it is about taking sides.


#4

The percentage of people in Saudi Arabia who are Saudi citizens and thus eligible to vote is tiny.


#5

I was brought up to understand that It doesn’t matter how someone looks or dresses, what counts is their character. Btw not all Saudi women cover their face. I don’t see how it matters how a woman in Saudi dresses but I do think that the folks in Saudi should be able to dress how they want. I also understand the importance of the peace of Westphalia, so If I was in Saudi I would respect their laws. If a Saudi visits the USA they should respect our laws. Many Saudis have visited the USA and continue to visit the USA. Some tens of thousands of Saudis are here in the USA studying at top universities.


#6

Heard of Wahhabism? If so check your facts about Saudi Arabia


#7

So you mean women should not have the right to vote because they will not have children? How does one follow from the other?


#8

You need to read the post I responded to and then do this every time you post. It makes your response relevant. If you are a feminist I would suggest that Saudi Arabia might not be a country where you can see the “joys” of feminism “blooming”.

Are you a progressive liberal or a supporter of the ALCU?


#9

Saudi Arabia is spoken about but often, a general category of “Gulf States” is stated as well.

Does one know who bankrolled the Egyptian Military overthrow of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt?

Whether it is true or not, this article states it was United Arab Emirates: middleeasteye.net/news/exclusive-emirati-plan-ruling-egypt-2084590756 and there is probably something to that.

Does one know who is funding Egypt’s fight against ISIS in the Sinai? UAE once again and ISIS Sinai affiliates are the ones who claim responsibility for taking down that jet airliner according to the MEE website which is an offshoot from the Guardian if one researches it.
middleeasteye.net/news/sinai-tribal-leader-demands-government-dialogue-militants-2098338591

Things are really more complex than it seems for their to always be criticism as if some proof exists of the wrongdoing a country is doing.

ISIS fighters are clearly coming from so many different nations that that does not give us a lot of insight.


#10

Why would you jump to the conclusion that I am a progressive liberal or a supporter of the ACLU based on one post? No I am neither.

Well, sorry for even engaging you in conversation. There was no malice intended. I learned my lesson. I will not do this again.


#11

Isn’t Saudi Arabia an absolute monarchy? If so voting would be as meaningful as it is most everywhere else. Governments don’t mind you voting if it makes you feel like it gives you a voice. It helps to prevent rebellion. I don’t think the Saudis have to fear that, at least not from women or Saudi feminists, if any exist. So I wonder what the motivation is?


#12

You obviously know nothing about Saudi Arabia.

If a woman put on a tank top and shorts and walked down the street, she would probably never see the light of day again.


#13

Happy to hear this and no apology necessary. As for jumping to conclusions, maybe you should read before responding with an irrelevant “answer”? HTH


#14

*RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — Women across Saudi Arabia marked a historic milestone on Saturday, both voting and running as candidates in government elections for the first time, but just outside polling stations they waited for male drivers — a reminder of the limitations still firmly in place.

The landmark election for local council seats was not expected to immediately advance the status of women in Saudi Arabia, who are still not permitted to drive, but it seen as a chance for them to make their voices heard as citizens.

“We are making history. I just made history,” said candidate Karima Bokhary, 50, after casting her ballot at a polling station in the capital Riyadh.*

news.yahoo.com/saudi-women-vote-first-time-landmark-election-064436061.html#

While women still do not have the right to drive in Saudi… I find that positive steps are being made in Saudi to eventually get to a point where men and women in Saudi are treated equally.


#15

Taqiyya


#16

What do you mean by check your facts on Saudi Arabia? Which point of mine are you responding to when you say that?

I have heard of Salafi Muslims… Many Salafis do live in Saudi Arabia and from what I understand these folks do not identify themselves as Wahhabists.


#17

Wrt the municipal elections in Saudi Arabia, already one woman has been elected.

*A woman has won a seat on a municipal council for the first time in Saudi Arabia, after the kingdom lifted its bar on women taking part in elections.

Salma bint Hizab al-Oteibi won a seat in Mecca province in Saturday’s vote.

Women have also won in several other regions in the country, including Jeddah and Qatif, reports suggest.*

bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35086357

This is a historic event and will IMO be a catalyst for improving the rights of women in Saudi Arabia.


#18

I dont understand the need for the tone of your point.

Yes in Saudi Arabia their are dress codes for both men and women. The women do have a stricter dress code, and that is inequality IMO. As I said earlier itt I find that folks in Saudi should be able to dress how they want to dress. I support the Saudi people who for example want to see the ban on female drivers in Saudi lifted. That being said I would respect the laws of Saudi Arabia if I was to visit Saudi Arabia just as I would like folks who visit the USA to respect the laws of the USA.


#19

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taqiya

Why did you post the word Taqiya itt?


#20

He presumably believes the process is an example of it. I believe it is tokenism thus far but even a token gesture may grow into something more. Unfortunately the majority of Saudis, male or female, are disenfranchised so it will be slow going and since women can’t drive if they don’t live near a polling station their chance to vote would have been unlikely. Especially if they have family who are not sympathetic to women voting. It took a long time for women to obtain the right to vote elsewhere and this is likely to be a slow and painful battle for Saudi women.


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