Saudi embassy attacked in Tehran


#1

Reports have emerged saying that Saudi Arabia’s embassy in Tehran and its consulate in Mashhad have been attacked by Iranian protesters early Sunday following the execution of a Saudi Shiite preacher along with 46 others.

Images shared on social media early on Sunday morning appeared to show Iranian protesters breaking into the Saudi embassy and starting fires.

english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2016/01/03/Saudi-embassy-attacked-in-Tehran-.html


#2

Yes that Shiite cleric executed and the others are all Al Quaedia sympathisers. Saudi Arabia is trying to clean up but they may have stirred the hornets nest. Muslims all over Europe, England and Middle East are very unhappy with the executions.


#3

No, the executed Shia cleric was not an Al-Qaeda supporter.


#4

Iran is not happy with the execution of the Shia cleric.


#5

Typical Iranian behavior. Nothing has changed in that regime.


#6

Most reports not written in Arabic are that he was not an advocate of violence, but an advocate of words.

There is a war between Sunnis and Shias in the ME now, and this is how Saudi Arabia is waging its war. Saudi Arabia has always been all about the torture and execution of those who they deem to be political enemies, and Iran is no different in that regard either.
Civil society and innocent until proven guilty are not attributes of any of the states of the ME. It should come as not surprise therefore that people are executed and tortured in these states without the question of innocence or guilt being a relevant consideration.
Iran is challenging Saudi Arabia for dominance in the region, and this is why the Shia cleric is dead.

These two countries are ipso facto at war.


#7

I agree with your assessment.


#8

For 2014, capital punishment:

China: figures not collated as details are a state secret

Iran: at least 289
Saudi Arabia: at least 90 (and at least 150 in 2015 so far)
Iraq: at least 61
USA: 35

List continues at link: bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-34982154

Reading the article, I can see in the face of terrorism, some leaders wishing to appear “tougher”. Sounds like a wrong was done in executing Al Nimr.


#9

could this lead to war between Iran and Saudi Arabia?


#10

nytimes.com/aponline/2016/01/03/world/middleeast/ap-ml-saudi-arabia-the-latest.html

9:40 a.m.

Saudi Arabia says that by condemning the execution of an opposition Shiite cleric, Iran has “revealed its true face represented in support for terrorism.”

A Foreign Ministry statement carried by the official Saudi Press Agency accuses Tehran of “blind sectarianism” and says that “by its defense of terrorist acts” Iran is a “partner in their crimes in the entire region.”

10 a.m.

Iran’s Supreme Leader says Saudi Arabia will face “divine revenge” after the execution of a revered Shiite cleric.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei made the comments Sunday, a day after Riyadh announced the execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr.

Khamenei’s website carried the comments by the ayatollah, who also criticized the ongoing Saudi-led war in Yemen against Shiite rebels, as well as the “persecution” of Shiites living in Saudi-allied Bahrain.

Also on Sunday, Khamenei’s Twitter account said: “Doubtlessly, unfairly spilled blood of oppressed martyr (hashtag)SheikhNimr will affect rapidly & Divine revenge will seize Saudi politicians.”

Protesters in Iran, angered by al-Nimr’s execution, broke into the Saudi Embassy early Sunday, setting fires and throwing papers from the roof.

Not helping the Iraq divide between the two.


#11

Do you think Iran and Saudi Arabia could go to war over this?


#12

I can’t see how it helps to throw gas on the fire of a holy war. What did SA do that Isis would not have done to Sheikh Nimr? Not good in that they just freed Ramadi and plan to head to Mosul. I can’t imagine how the Sunni tribes we all need to cooperate to rid ourselves of Isis will respond to this.


#13

(CNN)The State Department voiced “concerns” Saturday over the state-sanctioned execution of 47 people in Saudi Arabia, a rare public display of disapproval from the U.S. toward its critical Middle East ally.

“We have previously expressed our concerns about the legal process in Saudi Arabia and have frequently raised these concerns at high levels of the Saudi Government. We reaffirm our calls on the Government of Saudi Arabia to respect and protect human rights, and to ensure fair and transparent judicial proceedings in all cases,” the State Department said in a statement.

“We are particularly concerned that the execution of prominent Shia cleric and political activist Nimr al-Nimr risks exacerbating sectarian tensions at a time when they urgently need to be reduced,” the statement continued. "In this context, we reiterate the need for leaders throughout the region to redouble efforts aimed at de-escalating regional tensions.

cnn.com/2016/01/02/politics/saudi-arabia-executions-us-response/

It will also present the West with that most embarrassing of Middle Eastern problems: the continuing need to cringe and grovel to the rich and autocratic monarchs of the Gulf while gently expressing their unease at the grotesque butchery which the Saudi courts have just dished out to the Kingdom’s enemies. Had Isis chopped off the heads of Sunnis and Shias in Raqqa – especially that of a troublesome Shia priest like Sheikh Nimr – we can be sure that Dave Cameron[Obama] would have been tweeting his disgust at so loathsome an act.

After all, Isis cuts the heads of Sunni ‘apostates’ and Sunni Syrian and Iraqi soldiers just as readily as it slaughters Shias. Sheikh Nimr would have got precisely the same treatment from the thugs of the ‘Islamic State’ as he got from the Saudis – though without the mockery of a pseudo-legal trial which Sheikh Nimr was afforded and of which Amnesty complained.

independent.co.uk/voices/comment/saudi-arabias-executions-were-worthy-of-isis-so-will-david-cameron-and-the-west-now-stop-their-a6794046.html

Sounds like more of that terrorist identification problem again.


closed #14

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