Say something nice about Sola Scriptura. :)


#1

I was listening to Curtis Martin yesterday on some tapes on parenting my wife gave me. He was talking about how Evangelization in the Catholic context is supposed to look for what is true in the beliefs of the one we wish to convert and use that to help them come to the fullness of the truth in the Catholic faith. With that in mind I have a little exercise I want to try.

Say something good about the belief of Sola Scriptura.

I will start it out. Those who believe in Sola Scriptura, like we Catholics, hold the scriptures in high regard as the inerrant Word of God. Praise God for this.


#2

Wow that is pretty tough, how about this,

I as a Catholic fully believe, that ,All scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness.

The Bible should be read, meditated on and used to spread the gospel and to help attain better understandings so we can come to the unity Christ prayed for.

God Bless
Scylla


#3

It induces non-Catholics to read a Catholic book. :slight_smile:

geocities.com/thecatholicconvert/wherewegotthebible.html


#4

I was going to say something like this, but when I thought about it I came to the conclusion that it isn’t true.

As those who believe in Sola Scriptura use a Bible that has had Books removed from it.

So they do not hold scriputre in the same high regard as Cathoics do.


#5

[quote=ByzCath]I was going to say something like this, but when I thought about it I came to the conclusion that it isn’t true.

As those who believe in Sola Scriptura use a Bible that has had Books removed from it.

So they do not hold scriputre in the same high regard as Cathoics do.
[/quote]

I would say the initial reformers are guilty of this but as the Catechism says, we cannot charge today’s Protestants with the guilt of such things. I find todays protestant to hold the Bible in very high regard so I don’t agree. They are missing 7 books but most are likely ignorant of the history and reasons for the lack of 7 books. In fact I have met many who don’t even know that they were taken out.


#6

The scriptures are infallible (when infallibly interpreted).


#7

[quote=thessalonian]I would say the initial reformers are guilty of this but as the Catechism says, we cannot charge today’s Protestants with the guilt of such things. I find todays protestant to hold the Bible in very high regard so I don’t agree. They are missing 7 books but most are likely ignorant of the history and reasons for the lack of 7 books. In fact I have met many who don’t even know that they were taken out.
[/quote]

Ok, I can see this line of reasoning but then I get stuck with this.

They may hold the Bible in high regard but not in the way Catholics do because what they hold in high regard is their intrepetation of the scriptures which goes against what the Catholic Church teaches.

So again, I am at a road block to see anything good with a false doctrine.


#8

I have a real problem with this. While the original reformers removed books from the bible, modern day protestants accuse the catholic church of ADDING books to the bible. So I really don’t think they regard the scriptures in the same way we do. In fact, as a former protestant, I know they don’t.


#9

I am not saying that they have a perfect regard for the scriptures. I know they don’t. What I am trying to do with these threads is get us to look at what we have in common. Regarding scripture, though they don’t have the same regard they do have a high regard. It is something that we can use to leverage in our evangelization efforts, like Paul used the shrine to the unknown God in Acts 17 to explain Christ to the Athenians. This is also the method that St. Francis Xavier used in converting nearly 1 million to Catholicism.


#10

ByzCath,

See my post above to Christy Beth. The point is not look for what they have completely right. They do not have it completely right and I acknowledge that . But there is truth within their error. We can use that truth to help them understand the faith. A priest came to our parish a few years back. He was a missionary from New Guinea. As late as the 1940’s canabalism was still practiced. He said that this made it very easy for them to understand and accept the Eucharist of all things. See comments above about ACts 17.


#11

Perhaps this from Redemptoris Missio by JP II on Evangelization will help. I highly recommend the whole document:

vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_07121990_redemptoris-missio_en.html

The Spirit Is Present and Active in Every Time and Place

  1. The Spirit manifests himself in a special way in the Church and in her members. Nevertheless, his presence and activity are universal, limited neither by space nor time.35 The Second Vatican Council recalls that the Spirit is at work in the heart of every person, through the “seeds of the Word,” to be found in human initiatives-including religious ones-and in mankind’s efforts to attain truth, goodness and God himself.36

The Spirit offers the human race" the light and strength to respond to its highest calling"; through the Spirit, “mankind attains in faith to the contemplation and savoring of the mystery of God’s design”; indeed, "we are obliged to hold that the Holy Spirit offers everyone the possibility of sharing in the Paschal Mystery in a manner known to God."37 The Church “is aware that humanity is being continually stirred by the Spirit of God and can therefore never be completely indifferent to the problems of religion” and that "people will always…want to know what meaning to give their life, their activity and their death."38 The Spirit, therefore, is at the very source of man’s existential and religious questioning, a questioning which is occasioned not only by contingent situations but by the very structure of his being.39

The Spirit’s presence and activity affect not only the individuals but also society and history, peoples, cultures and religions. Indeed, the Spirit is at the origin of the noble ideals and undertakings which benefit humanity on its journey through history: "The Spirit of God with marvelous foresight directs the course of the ages and renews the face of the earth."40 The risen Christ "is now at work in human hearts through the strength of his Spirit, not only instilling a desire for the world to come but also thereby animating, purifying and reinforcing the noble aspirations which drive the human family to make its life one that is more human and to direct the whole earth to this end."41 Again, it is the Spirit who sows the “seeds of the Word” present in various customs and cultures, preparing them for full maturity in Christ.42

See next post


#12
  1. Thus the Spirit, who “blows where he wills” (cf. Jn 3:8), who "was already at work in the world before Christ was glorified,"43 and who “has filled the world,…holds all things together [and] knows what is said” (Wis 1:7), leads us to broaden our vision in order to ponder his activity in every time and place.44 I have repeatedly called this fact to mind, and it has guided me in my meetings with a wide variety of peoples. The Church’s relationship with other religions is dictated by a twofold respect: "Respect for man in his quest for answers to the deepest questions of his life, and respect for the action of the Spirit in man."45 Excluding any mistaken interpretation, the interreligious meeting held in Assisi was meant to confirm my conviction that "every authentic prayer is prompted by the Holy Spirit, who is mysteriously present in every human heart."46

#13

By the way, for anyone who thinks I am soft on Sola Scriptura, has not followed my posts against the topic too well. We can have a pure clean bucket of water and add a teaspoon of water from a toilet and we most certainly would not drink it. Yet we can still see through the water to the bottom of the bucket.


#14

The only nice thing that I could say about Sola Scriptura is that it’s fun to say. Sorry. :frowning:


#15

OK, here goes…

The doctrine of sola scriptura produces the requirement to be intimately familiar with the contents of Sacred Scripture (because by definition of the doctrine, there is nowhere else to go). Frequent contact and interaction with the sacred texts can bring forth many blessings, even softening the heart of the unbeliever. While the full meaning of the text may not be understood, the seeds of God’s Wisdom may still be planted, awaiting the authoritative instruction of the true Spirit of God (through the Church) that will produce in the believer much fruit.

How’s that?

Peace,
javelin


#16

Our separated brothers have a great love of God and a very high reverence for His word. They are committed to getting the most that they can from what they have, and typically err with only the best intentions. In my experience, our Sola Scriptura brothers try to internalize the word by memorizing huge amounts of scripture (they can’t eat “the Word”, so they eat the “word”), and as a result receive a great deal of grace. They take very seriously God’s commandments to evangelize, repent, pray, and believe. They are also zealous in their defense of the scriptures, which is a lesson many Catholics could stand to learn. As they have only two sacraments, they look to the bible as an instrument of grace - and not without reason. May God bless them and bring them home sooner, rather than later.

RyanL


#17

[quote=DeFide]It induces non-Catholics to read a Catholic book. :slight_smile:

geocities.com/thecatholicconvert/wherewegotthebible.html
[/quote]

:rotfl: Great answer!

Sola scriptura makes it easier to present Catholic truths to Protestants because it gives us a common ground to work with. Explaining how John 6 is a promise of the Eucharist wouldn’t have much effect if Protestants didn’t trust the Bible. It still probably won’t result in an instantaneous conversion, but it carries more weight with them than it would if they thought Scripture was just a collection of some documents among many.


#18

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