School system retirees "double dip" with waiver

School teachers are allowed to get full pensions and full social security also where fire fighters only get 1/2 of their social security due to a bill put in during the Reagen administration.

Forty years ago, the school system was more male dominated- about 50/50, now the school department has a much higher rate of women.

This article was interesting…

Nearly 100 retired educators in the Commonwealth were allowed to earn their full salaries while collecting full pensions in the past school year, a growing practice critics call state-sanctioned “double dipping.”

The retirees collectively made more than $5 million on the job while taking home $5.5 million in pension payments, according to information obtained by the Globe…

“I’m double dipping and I’m happy to be doing it,” said Ralph Olsen, 62, who is finishing up his second year as principal of Durfee High School in Fall River and plans to return next school year. Olsen, who retired as Framingham High School principal in 2004, earns $87,311 a year in pension income and makes $140,000 a year in his new position.

The income boost sets him up for his real retirement down the road, providing extra “security in my waning years,” he said. “I’d like to think the benefits are mutual.”

boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/06/28/school_system_retirees_double_dip_with_waiver/

What bothers also is that the last five years of earnings are the years they use to calculate retirement benefits and they boost earnings up with saved sick pay,etc.

If they earned both in the same system, with the same contributions, it’s a problem.

In my case, I had a career in industry, and earned a retirement and social security, before becoming a teacher in my late 50s. Because Texas has a separate retirement system, they don’t take out Social Security.

As a result, I’ll get three checks at retirement, for Social Security, my old company’s retirement plan, and my Teacher retirement (I’ll have earned enough years to qualify for a small teacher pension)

If the government would like to pay me back the money I put into Social Security, I would call it even, and not ask for a check.

Not likely to happen, um. The “double dipping” thing Reagan did to firefighters was just a way to raise taxes by taking away retirement funds the firemen paid into the system, without giving them anything.

That is a despicable thing, but it’s government.

If they earned both in the same system, with the same contributions, it’s a problem.

In my case, I had a career in industry, and earned a retirement and social security, before becoming a teacher in my late 50s. Because Texas has a separate retirement system, they don’t take out Social Security.

As a result, I’ll get three checks at retirement, for Social Security, my old company’s retirement plan, and my Teacher retirement (I’ll have earned enough years to qualify for a small teacher pension)

Many people like me don’t work enough years in Social Security to get a full retirement,and so the government just skims that off as profit. If the government would like to pay me back the money I put into Social Security, with a reasonable rate of interest, I would call it even, and not ask for a check.

Not likely to happen, um? The “double dipping” thing Reagan did to firefighters was just a way to raise taxes by taking away retirement funds the firemen paid into the system, without giving them anything.

That is a despicable thing, but it’s government.

some states have passed laws against this practice on the part of teachers, some have a “retire and pull your pension but come back to work for lesser salary” plan, I can’t remember what they call it, but some districts in Texas do it.

what governs teacher pension plan is not necessarily justice to teachers or other taxpayers, it is the relative need for teachers in that area. If they want to encourage teachers to retire to get high paid people out of the system, the put in place a policy that encourages early retirement. If the way to retain or attract teachers, the put in place policies that try to do that.

Eugene Thayer, the highest paid of the working retirees, said taxpayers are getting their money’s worth. He earns $192,000 a year as superintendent of Framingham schools, the latest in a string of short-term superintendent posts over the past eight years. His pension is worth an additional $85,000 a year.

The 72-year-old just signed on for a second year leading Framingham schools…

Although Boston headmaster Peggy Kemp retired in 1992, she has been leading Fenway High School for the last five years. She commands a $116,945 salary as well as a $20,822-a-year pension.

Kemp declined to comment, but the application the district submitted contained no documentation of yearly advertising or any attempt to find a nonretired candidate.

“Double dipping” and another practice of boosting pensions by overtime, accumulated sick pay seems a bit much when young people are looking for jobs.

NISD in San Antonio had a “Retire/Rehire” program. A teacher would retire, receive their retirement, and get rehired at the beginning teacher salaries.

I think the District discontinued the program, but the teachers still in the program were grandfathered.

It’s true. “Retire and rehire” won’t work for teachers in Texas. Which is a bit of a problem when the economy is good. Decent substitutes can’t be gotten, because good people have regular jobs and retired teachers can’t help out because their retirement is taken from them.

The policies are uniform throughout Texas; it’s a state system.

Not quite uniform. Yes the Teacher Retirement System is for all teachers in Texas - but some districts pay Social Security, most don’t.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.