Scots Police Teach US Cops How To Avoid Gun Use


#21

The worst parts of Glasgow are like Mister Rogers Neighborhood compared to the worst parts of Chicago, Detroit, Baltimore, St Louis, etc.


#22

British police I’ve encountered generally consider that kind of behaviour as at odds with policing here. They tend to just ignore the rude remarks thrown at them unless it gets ridiculous. I’ve seen them called amazingly rude things. I remember asking for a guy who kept following a colleague of mine home to be arrested and he told the arresting officer his mum was a whore and offered sexual services for a cheap price (in rather more crude words) and went on and on in that vein. The arresting officer let him go on for a few minutes and turned to his colleague and said, ‘He’s not very original is he?’ and then asked him had he finished. There is an expectation that you just take that sort of stuff on the chin in services like the police here.

Whilst the British police forces (there is no one overall force for the country as a whole) are not perfect and have had their own local and national problems I’d find it lamentable if they or An Garda Siochana (the Irish Police) who are similarly mostly unarmed were to routinely carry weapons. The only British police force that has generally been routinely armed was the old RIC and the force that succeeded them the RUC.


#23

This might be meaningful if US cops were getting advice from the London Police, rather than the Scots.

I don’t have to make that assumption to assert that policing small, racially homogenous cities is going to be quite a bit different from policing large racially and ethnically diverse cities.

I’m going to take a wild guess and assume that there aren’t any current serving members of the Scots police that helped put down the Glasgow riot of 1919…


#24

No there are not but if you ask Vouthon he will tell you that pretty unpleasant rioting and violence of a nasty kind has occurred far more recently than that famous riot.


#25

I suspect Scottish policemen would last about 30 seconds in the Southside of Chicago.


#26

Oh rather longer than that.


#27

There’s no doubt. Let the Scots come here and show us how it’s done. It’s all apples and oranges, some things might work but no where near all.


#28

Which rather suggests that the Scots are doing something right. :thumbsup:


#29

I hope none of the British police from Rotherham will be teaching our police how to deal with crimes against children cases…


#30

If you had the same people from those inner city areas of the US they’d be a serious problem anywhere. It’s a gangland criminal culture.


#31

It’s also worth noting that the primary function of the police is to keep people safe.

If one can avoid the police killing people, or being killed by civilians, that’s a good thing but it is not the most important thing for a police officer, who is sworn to protect the people of his community.

Scotland has the highest rate of recorded physical assaults against their population of any country: 1,655.1 assaults per 100,000 people. That’s much higher than Boston (where they have gone to teach), which has 800 assaults per 100,000.

Source: nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Crime/Assault-rate;
bphc.org/healthdata/health-of-boston-report/Documents/HOB-2014-2015/11_Violence_HOB%202014-2015.pdf

I don’t know, maybe the Boston cops should be teaching them.


#32

Tbe Boston cops could bring along some doughnuts to share as they exchange ideas and experience.


#33

This thing about cops and doughnuts has really turned into a tired, and kind of insulting stereotype. While in some areas it was true (mainly small communities) that it was a gathering spot, it’s now used to demean police officers.


#34

I don’t know any police officer who doesn’t like coffee. When I worked in a donut shop, the coffee was free for the police. I think that’s why they came by in particular. It was good coffee too.


#35

That would be considered corruption for an UK police officer and he would be investigated for getting free goods in that manner if it occurred consistently and was reported.


#36

The guy who ran the shop liked having the police around, so it was his call. I just did what I was told. I can see where you’re coming from, but I can see where he was coming from. Coffee - well, maybe not corruption, but free donuts - definitely corruption.


#37

And the Scots could supply deep fried Mars bars. :eek:


#38

I think that might fall under the heading ‘cruel and unusual punishment’.


#39

Sounds liike a great tourism slogan. Come see the toughest of the tough.


#40

I don’t know

youtu.be/x2a5CjKOTlg


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