Scriptural references for the mass


#1

I need a suggestion for a resource (internet site, book, etc.) to pass along to a penecostal friend of mine on the origins of the mass, including specific scriptural references. I’m looking for something succinct that would basically walk one through the missal explaining the origin of each part.

Thanks in advance! God Bless!


#2

[quote=Christina]I need a suggestion for a resource (internet site, book, etc.) to pass along to a penecostal friend of mine on the origins of the mass, including specific scriptural references. I’m looking for something succinct that would basically walk one through the missal explaining the origin of each part.

Thanks in advance! God Bless!
[/quote]

Scott Hahn’s “Lamb’s Supper”. It show how the book of Revelations directly parrellel’s the Mass. Full of refs.


#3

[quote=thessalonian]Scott Hahn’s “Lamb’s Supper”. It show how the book of Revelations directly parrellel’s the Mass. Full of refs.
[/quote]

I second that.


#4

Jimmy Akin’s Tract, Mass Appeal. You can probably get it on-line.

It’s short, sweet, and to the point.

Scott Hahn’s “The Lambs Supper” is far better, but may get too “mystical” for them. He does a fantastic job of relating Revelations to the Mass.

Jimmy Akin’s book covers the cold hard facts, and would be a good starter as it’s only 32 pages. Do you have those small books in your church that people can pick up? I’ll bet his book is in there.

Good Luck,

NotWorthy


#5

[quote=Christina]I need a suggestion for a resource (internet site, book, etc.) to pass along to a penecostal friend of mine on the origins of the mass, including specific scriptural references. I’m looking for something succinct that would basically walk one through the missal explaining the origin of each part.

Thanks in advance! God Bless!
[/quote]

As others have already said, I highly recommend The Lamb’s Supper, by Scott Hahn. I have a wonderful new appreciation for the meaning of the Mass since reading that book last year. Hahn goes through each part of the Mass, describing the meaning and the scriptualness of it all. It is a short book, so it should not take too long to read through it.


#6

this site is excellent :thumbsup: :

scripturecatholic.com/the_eucharist.html


#7

Thank you all. I have read Lamb’s Supper, but was thinking of getting her started with something more basic. I’ll start with Mass Appeal and the website. Thanks so much!


#8

The following is an excerpt I took out of Jimmy Akin’s book. This will give you an idea of what to expect:

Even before Mass starts, there are many things you see in church. Just as there are reasons for the different parts of the Mass, there are also reasons for these things. Holy water is placed, at the entrance of the church to remind us that through baptism we entered the Church. Holy water has been used since biblical days: In an earthen vessel he shall meanwhile put some holy water, as well as some dust that he has taken from the floor of the Dwelling (Num. 5:17[1]). Today people customarily bless themselves with holy water by making the sign of the Cross. Those who are not yet baptized can do this as a way of looking forward to their baptism.

The many candles you find in the church, not only provide light, but also serve as symbols. They symbolize the teaching of Christ, “the light of the world” (John 8:12), and they symbolize prayer, as prayers are offered up when each votive candle is lit. Another symbol of prayer you sometimes see in church is incense. Because the smoke of incense floats upward, it has been used since biblical times to symbolize our prayers rising before God: ***Each of the elders held a harp and gold bowls filled with incense, which are the prayers of the holy ones ***(Rev. 5:8).

The statues, carvings, and pictures of saints and angels in the church go back to the Old Testament, when God commanded the Israelites to fill their places of worship with images of angels: Make two cherubim of beaten gold for the two ends of the propitiatory,*** ***fastening them so that one cherub springs direct from each end (Ex. 25:18-19). This was because the holy places symbolize heaven, and to remind men of this, God had them place representations of the inhabitants of heaven in them. Since Jesus has opened the gates of heaven, human souls now go there. That is why we now have statues of human saints as well as angels.

The main body of the church, where we all sit, is called the nave. The other main part of the church is called the sanctuary. It is the central place where the priests, deacons, and other ministers perform their roles at Mass. The Scriptures are read at a podium, called a lectern. The central part of the mass is performed at the altar, where the priest celebrates the Eucharist. Ever since biblical times, the altar has been referred to as "the table of the Lord" (Mal. 1:7, 21; 1 Cor. 10:21), which is why offerings such as the Eucharist are made there. To show their reverence for the table of the Lord, people bow their heads when they pass in front of an altar.
[1] Holy water: water from the laver that stood in the court of the Dwelling.

I remain NotWorthy


#9

The Catholic Church and the Bible, by Fr Peter Stravinskas, from Our Sunday Visitor, incorporates his earlier pamphlet on the scriptural origins of the Mass in the chapter on the Mass, and is an excellent short work to introduce this topic.


#10

Try
myweb.lmu.edu/fjust/Bible/Biblical_Mass_Texts.htm
salvationhistory.com/online/beginner/course2_lesson1a.cfm
churches.kconline.com/stroberts/massbible.html


#11

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