Scrupulosity...sinful?


#1

I just read in another source the assertion that claimed that some aspects of scrupulosity, namely: seeing sins or sinful behavior where there is none, can actually lead one into sin.

I thought that the Church considered scrupulosity to be more of a condition, a mitigating factor in the confession of and recognition of sin. Most of the scrupulous people I have met do see sin in everything/everywhere, and are sooo careful not to commit ANY sin.

Can someone please tell me the reasoning behind scrupulosity leading to sin?


#2

When a person struggles with scruples - what ought they do?

A person with scrupulosity --ought to have a* “regular confessor” *who can direct them --and even give them some general principles to follow -to apply (principles for them due to their particular scruples -they are usually not for those with a normal conscience).

Such ‘obedience’ (except in what is manifest sin - such as if he told them it was ok to murder someone or something certain like that) is key.

They with the direction of their confessor and the principles given - then act contrary to their scruples - ignore them -(using the older language) despise them, dismiss them–following that direction and the principles given.

Thus Jim fears that Y is a sin and his confessor directs him that he may do Y without any sin. Thus he acts against his fear/scruple and does Y obeying his confessor. Jim does not sin.

Those with scrupulosity can yes see sin where sin is not and need to have assistance and direction - at least in certain areas. For their compass is off and they need to no follow its spin in those cases.

Here was a recent post from Jimmy Akin of CA that I saw in the Register.

ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/6-tools-for-the-scrupulous


#3

I just read in another source the assertion that claimed that some aspects of scrupulosity, namely: seeing sins or sinful behavior where there is none, can actually lead one into sin.

As Bookcat said, this is why its important to have a spiritual director.


#4

Sin simply refers to evil, and the suffering caused by scrupulosity is certainly evil, albeit a natural evil that the sufferer usually bares no personal responsibility for.

Such sources, however, are generally targeted towards priests who help guide their parishioner towards managing their symptoms. Reading these sources, while still experiencing scrupulosity, can cause more distress. It is best to seek information from professionals, such as your priest, who can interpret this information to best fit your particular circumstances.


#5

You may be confusing scrupulosity with an examination of conscience. I’d be careful of people telling you there is no sin when your instincts tell you differently. The serpent was a master of rationalizing sin in the Garden of Eden. Adam and Eve ended up being banished.


#6

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