(Secular) Franciscans vs. (Third Order) Dominicans


#1

I posted a thread not too long ago and I managed to get pointed to these two groups. What would be a clear summary of the spiritualities of the orders and a clear comparison/contrasting thereof?


#2

Well Franciscan Spirituality entails a lot. We live a life of poverty. We also follow the rule of St. Francis in living out the Gospel. I am not familiar with the Domincans. Br. JR, OSF would be the best person to talk about the differences in the Dominican and Franciscan Spirituality. Have you read many works on St. Francis or St. Dominic????


#3

There are similarities and significant differences between the Dominican and Franciscan families. Let’s look at the differences first.

CANONICAL IDENTITY:

Secular Franciscans: an autonomous order of Pontifical Right with its own government, rule and constitution, not related to the friars or the nuns, except that we share a common founding father. They even have their own canonical name, property, superior general and representation in the Vatican.

Lay Dominicans: a public association of the faithful that exists in association with the Order of Preachers. It is dependent on the Order of Preachers for government and representation in the Church.

MISSION AND MINISTRY:

Secular Franciscans: to sanctify the secular world by living the Gospel in the manner of St. Francis of Assisi—the focus in on the way that you live

Lay Dominicans: to sanctify the world by preaching the Gospel to all men—there is a strong focus on a very specific apostolate: preaching

RULE:

Secular Franciscans: have their own rule written by St. Francis of Assisi in 1221, just for them and revised by Pope Paul VI in 1978, just before his death. It is often referred to as The Rule of Penance, because they are called to a life of penance. It is the third of four rules written by St. Francis. That’s how they came to be known as the Third Franciscan Order. They were the first secular order in the Church.

Lay Dominicans: the Dominican Order does not have a rule. St. Dominic was not allowed to write one. The Dominican Order follows the Rule of St. Augustine. The statutes given to them by Dominic and the constitution fill in the blanks that St. Augustine does not address in his rule. The Dominican family follows the same rule, but they have specific statutes for the Lay Dominicans.

APPROACH TO FAITH

Secular Franciscan: follow the same approach as the rest of the Franciscan family. We follow the spirituality of our Holy Father Francis. Our spirituality is Incarnational, Christ breaks into human history out of love. We believe that he would have done so, even without Original Sin. We respond to Christ’s love by imitating his total submission on the Cross. We approach faith from the heart to the head.

Lay Dominican follow the same principles as other Dominicans. Christ calls all men to the Father. He proclaims salvation to the world. Man is called to hear, understand and apply the Christian message in his daily life. Dominicans respond by studying and proclaiming the Gospel. The approach is from the head to the heart.

OVERLAPS

Because both families were founded at the same time in the history of the Church and were both mendicant families, they have certain overlaps.

Intense life of prayer, unquestioning obedience to the hierarchy and the authorities within the order, commitment to a life of detachment from material things, devotion to the Eucharist and Virgin Mary, daily prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours, a public profession to live this way of life binding until death.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)


#4

wonderful explainations Bro. Jr.


#5

***Hi Marcus,
I believe this post pretty much explains it !
Thank you Br. JR, OSF ! :thankyou:

Br. James, OPL ***


#6

Brother JR put it nicely - the “life of poverty” I think could be a whole other discussion but I wanted to comment on it here. In a Secular Sense it is very different than that of the Religious. It is not about necessarily not having. It is about understanding that what we have is not ours - it is to be shared. I know a few SFO that have plenty but their homes are always open. It is also not just a material poverty. For instance - my body is not mine - (the Culture of Death would certainly like me to think it is)- it is shared with the Lord for the Lord’s purpose. My talents are not mine. They are shared with the Lord and my fellow man. I think it is important when we introduce this to newcomers that they don’t get the idea of living in a cardboard box. While we are welcome to do this - I know that someday when I get myself out of the material poverty I am in that my home will always be open to anyone who needs to stay there.(Scandal requirements aside of course. :blush:)

I think St Bonaventure does a very nice job adapting the Beatitudes to the Franciscan Rule to explain this Rule.


#7

[quote="joandarc2008, post:6, topic:221661"]
Brother JR put it nicely - the "life of poverty" I think could be a whole other discussion but I wanted to comment on it here. In a Secular Sense it is very different than that of the Religious. It is not about necessarily not having. It is about understanding that what we have is not ours - it is to be shared. I know a few SFO that have plenty but their homes are always open. It is also not just a material poverty. For instance - my body is not mine - (the Culture of Death would certainly like me to think it is)- it is shared with the Lord for the Lord's purpose. My talents are not mine. They are shared with the Lord and my fellow man. I think it is important when we introduce this to newcomers that they don't get the idea of living in a cardboard box. While we are welcome to do this - I know that someday when I get myself out of the material poverty I am in that my home will always be open to anyone who needs to stay there.(Scandal requirements aside of course. :blush:)

I think St Bonaventure does a very nice job adapting the Beatitudes to the Franciscan Rule to explain this Rule.

[/quote]

Yes the secular sense is very different than the religious. I come from both ends of the spectrum. With my journey into the S.F.O. and understanding what poverty is in that sense, but also I had a Great-Aunt who was a Franciscan nun and have learned a lot about Poverty in that sense as well. I do hold a lot of the same views that you described in the post. Bro JR did put it quite clear. [BIBLEDRB][/BIBLEDRB]


#8

i have a question about something when it comes to Third Orders. Are the members of the SFO the only ones that are allowed to use their orders initials behind there name? For example when it comes to the third orders it has only been the Secular Franciscan Order that i have seen with SFO behind the names of individuals names such as permanent deacons or seminarians on their ordination announcement/invitations from the Diocese they put OSF behind the names of the Deacons that were being ordained, Or just in everyday life in letters or bulletins or just whenever they sign there name to something. I have been to other ordinations and things as such with Third order Dominicans and other third order individuals but they never have OP, or TOC behind their names. I guess what i'm asking is it only the Secular Franciscans that have right to have their orders initials behind their names because they are an order of Pontifical Right, or is just that in these other cases maybe the Individuals just choose not to add their orders initials behind their names. If you are confused please let me know and i'll try to explain it better. Also because the SFO is an order of Pontifical Right are they more of a order in the eyes of the Church than the other Third Orders? Thanks Ryan
Pax

Here is an example of what i mean:[ATTACH]10169[/ATTACH]

[quote="JReducation, post:3, topic:221661"]
There are similarities and significant differences between the Dominican and Franciscan families. Let’s look at the differences first.

CANONICAL IDENTITY:

Secular Franciscans: an autonomous order of Pontifical Right with its own government, rule and constitution, not related to the friars or the nuns, except that we share a common founding father. They even have their own canonical name, property, superior general and representation in the Vatican.

Lay Dominicans: a public association of the faithful that exists in association with the Order of Preachers. It is dependent on the Order of Preachers for government and representation in the Church.

MISSION AND MINISTRY:

Secular Franciscans: to sanctify the secular world by living the Gospel in the manner of St. Francis of Assisi—the focus in on the way that you live

Lay Dominicans: to sanctify the world by preaching the Gospel to all men—there is a strong focus on a very specific apostolate: preaching

RULE:

Secular Franciscans: have their own rule written by St. Francis of Assisi in 1221, just for them and revised by Pope Paul VI in 1978, just before his death. It is often referred to as The Rule of Penance, because they are called to a life of penance. It is the third of four rules written by St. Francis. That’s how they came to be known as the Third Franciscan Order. They were the first secular order in the Church.

Lay Dominicans: the Dominican Order does not have a rule. St. Dominic was not allowed to write one. The Dominican Order follows the Rule of St. Augustine. The statutes given to them by Dominic and the constitution fill in the blanks that St. Augustine does not address in his rule. The Dominican family follows the same rule, but they have specific statutes for the Lay Dominicans.

APPROACH TO FAITH

Secular Franciscan: follow the same approach as the rest of the Franciscan family. We follow the spirituality of our Holy Father Francis. Our spirituality is Incarnational, Christ breaks into human history out of love. We believe that he would have done so, even without Original Sin. We respond to Christ’s love by imitating his total submission on the Cross. We approach faith from the heart to the head.

Lay Dominican follow the same principles as other Dominicans. Christ calls all men to the Father. He proclaims salvation to the world. Man is called to hear, understand and apply the Christian message in his daily life. Dominicans respond by studying and proclaiming the Gospel. The approach is from the head to the heart.

OVERLAPS

Because both families were founded at the same time in the history of the Church and were both mendicant families, they have certain overlaps.

Intense life of prayer, unquestioning obedience to the hierarchy and the authorities within the order, commitment to a life of detachment from material things, devotion to the Eucharist and Virgin Mary, daily prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours, a public profession to live this way of life binding until death.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)

[/quote]


#9

The Lay Dominicans are allowed to add O.P. or O.P.L after their names.


#10

We are no longer allowed to use O.P.L., it is O.P. or nowt. Whether one uses it or not seems to depend on country of origin. Lay Dominicans in the UK tend not to use the intials, although we are as entitled to do so as anyone else, I have never known anyone to use them. In articles I read from Lay Dominicans in the U.S. and Australia, they all seem to use O.P.L. (although they have presumably now dropped the L). Since it was the Dominican General Chapter which advised on the initials we could use, I would assume that the initials are a matter for the governance of each individual Order rather than anything to do with pontifical right; I could be wrong.


#11

I'm guessing that the Secular Franciscans use it, because it does not create confusion. In the Franciscan family, each obedience has it's own name. There is not such thing as "Franciscan".

Franciscan are the sons and daughters of St. Francis. In other words, the term "Franciscan" was available when they simplified the name of their order. They were the Brothers and Sisters of Penance. Today, they are the Secular Franciscan Order (SFO).

Let's say the Dominicans, the entire Dominican family uses, Order of Preachers. The obediences have what I call "last names" Dominican Sisters of the Holy Cross, Dominican Sisters of Mary, etc. They are all part of the Order of Preachers.

In the Franciscan family, we are not part of the same order. We are part of the same family. For example, my community is the Brothers of Life of the Order of St. Francis. We use the last three letters, OSF.

If you observe the Franciscans of the Renewal, they use CFR. Other Franciscans use OFM, OSC and so forth.

No, the Secular Franciscan Order is not more an order than the Lay Dominicans. It holds the place of respect among the secular orders because it was the first secular order in the history of the Church and it is the largest secular order in the Church with about 500,000 brothers and sisters in more than 114 countries. It also has actual physical houses, most are retreat houses. It is the largest of all the Franciscan obediences.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)


#12

[quote="JReducation, post:11, topic:221661"]
I'm guessing that the Secular Franciscans use it, because it does not create confusion. In the Franciscan family, each obedience has it's own name. There is not such thing as "Franciscan".

Franciscan are the sons and daughters of St. Francis. In other words, the term "Franciscan" was available when they simplified the name of their order. They were the Brothers and Sisters of Penance. Today, they are the Secular Franciscan Order (SFO).

Let's say the Dominicans, the entire Dominican family uses, Order of Preachers. The obediences have what I call "last names" Dominican Sisters of the Holy Cross, Dominican Sisters of Mary, etc. They are all part of the Order of Preachers.

In the Franciscan family, we are not part of the same order. We are part of the same family. For example, my community is the Brothers of Life of the Order of St. Francis. We use the last three letters, OSF.

If you observe the Franciscans of the Renewal, they use CFR. Other Franciscans use OFM, OSC and so forth.

No, the Secular Franciscan Order is not more an order than the Lay Dominicans. It holds the place of respect among the secular orders because it was the first secular order in the history of the Church and it is the largest secular order in the Church with about 500,000 brothers and sisters in more than 114 countries. It also has actual physical houses, most are retreat houses. It is the largest of all the Franciscan obediences.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)

[/quote]

Thanks Brother JR!


#13

Please check our website:

sandamianofranciscancommunity.org

Founded in 1981, we are a Third Order Penitent community of vowed and professed men and women, married and single, living our lives in the spirit of St. Francis of Assisi in accordance to a common rule, centered around prayer, work, study and outreach ministries. We are a Public Association of the Faithful headquartered in the Albany NY Roman Catholic Diocese, with strict loyalty to the Magesterium, under the protection of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Our Mother House is located in Peteresburgh, NY. We have prayer cells and communities located around the United States and Canada. We continually seek members in all countries who wish to live the lifestyle of a Third Order Penitent.

If you have any questions, please give us a call


closed #14

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