Septuagint


#1

Septuagint and Catholic Bible

The Septuagint (which comes from the Latin for 70, “septuaginta”) was a translation of the Hebrew Books of the Old Testament into Greek, by 70 Jewish scholars.

The translation became necessary when it was found that most of the Israelites in exile, especially as a result of the Babylonian Captivity of 586-536 B.C., did not know Hebrew, but wanted to read the sacred books.

The work was done in Alexandria, Egypt, sometime between 250 B.C. and 100 B.C… This translation was warmly welcomed by Jews outside Palestine, as was read by many Gentiles. Consequently, many Gentiles were familiar with the important ideas in the Old Testament and were thus prepared to hear and accept the teachings of Jesus Christ.

In the early Church no list of inspired books had been accepted or approved.

Christ, and then the Apostles, did not give us a list of books which were inspired. However, the Septuagint was extremely influential among Jews living outside Palestine (and some inside Palestine), and was the sacred writings adopted by the early Greek-speaking Christians.

Throughout the New Testament there are more than 300 direct quotations or paraphrases from the Septuagint Bible out of some 350 Old Testament references. Scholars regard this as an indication that the Catholic Christian writers of the Apostolic Era had adopted the Septuagint as their own.

The Christians took the Septuagint over so completely that the Jews decided to adopt their own version. This was done about 90 A.D…

The Council of Hippo (393), the Council of Carthage (397), and Pope Innocent I (405) listed the 46 books of the Septuagint as inspired. The Catholic, Greek, Russian and other Orthodox Old Testaments are based on the Septuagint.


#2

If the Septuagint was accepted as the Old Testament, why was not all of it accepted? Why were 3 Esdras, Psalm 151, the Prayer of Mannaseh, and 3 Maccabes excluded? They are included in the Orthodox Old Testament but not the Catholic.


#3

Can you show me one quote from the NT that references a book of the Apocrypha.

Just to get facts straight the word means 70 but the name comes from the legend that 72 men (six from each of the Twelve Tribes of Israel) were assigned the task of translating the Old Testament from Hebrew to Greek.


#4

The canonization of the Bible wasn’t a “one time deal”. As a matter of fact, in the west, the Bible wasn’t “canonized” until April 8th, 1546 at the Council of Trent. Certain books weren’t canonized because they just hadn’t been circulated in Latin the west for whatever reason. However, it is quite acceptable for a Catholic to have a Bible with 3 Maccabees, Psalm 151, Prayer of Mannaseh, and 3 Esdras contained within it’s covers - but those books just aren’t part of the cycle of readings in the Latin Church.

Never confuse the Latin (“Roman”) Rite of the Catholic Church with the Universal (“Catholic”) Church itself. Just because Latin Rite Catholics do something doesn’t mean ALL Catholics do the same thing.


#5

“If the New Testament never quotes from these seven books, doesn’t that indicate that they were not considered to be inspired?”

Following this reasoning, we’d have to throw out the eight other Old Testament books—such as the Song of Songs—that are also not quoted in the New Testament. If we’re not willing to do that, we have to agree that the absence of a quote in the New Testament does not suggest that a book is not inspired.

Though there are no quotes, the New Testament does make numerous allusions to the deuterocanonical books. For one strong example, examine Hebrews 11:35: “Women received their dead by resurrection. Some were tortured, refusing to accept release that they might rise again to a better life.” Nowhere in the Protestant Old Testament can this story be found. One must look to a Catholic Bible to read the story in 2 Maccabees 7.

| SOURCE |


#6

My post was used to rebutt this comment

Throughout the New Testament there are more than 300 direct quotations or paraphrases from the Septuagint Bible out of some 350 Old Testament references. Scholars regard this as an indication that the Catholic Christian writers of the Apostolic Era had adopted the Septuagint as their own…

So is the rest of the Septuagint not valid.
You can not use statements to back your points and then turn around and when someone uses the same reasoning you say its false.
Following this reasoning, we’d have to throw out the eight other Old Testament books
Your quote

Make up your mind you can not have it both ways!!!


#7

And if I do, what then?


#8

Since I’m not arguing both ways I’m not trying to have it both ways. I just supplied a source for an argument.

My mind is made up: I accept what the Church has provided to me. I accept that the holy Spirit guides the Church in all truth and that the Canon of Scripture provided by the Church is exactly what the Spirit wants.

I thought your post was about seeing a quote from the NT in any of the Deuterocanonicals.


#9

The information is correct.

There are numerous citation from the Septuagint in the New Testament. They aren’t quoted though.

For example Matthew 2:16 is a prophesy that was mention in the Book of Wisdom 11:7.

Matthew 2:16

Then Herod perceiving that he was deluded by the wise men, was exceeding angry; and sending killed all the men children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the borders thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently inquired of the wise men.

Wisdom 11:6-10

6 By the same things they in their need were benefited. 7 For instead of a fountain of an ever running river, thou gavest human blood to the unjust. 8 And whilst they were diminished for a manifest reproof of their murdering the infants, thou gavest to thine abundant water unlooked for: 9 Shewing by the thirst that was then, how thou didst exalt thine, and didst kill their adversaries. 10 For when they were tried, and chastised with mercy, they knew how the wicked were judged with wrath and tormented.

For more reference check this website:

scripturecatholic.com/deuterocanon.html

scripturecatholic.com/septuagint.html

The evidence is very clear.


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