Sex Addiction Outbreak


#1

Why do so many people accept the sudden sex/porn/masturbation addiction outbreak without a challenge? The American Psychiatric Association doesn’t recognize sexual addiction why should we? We are talking about a bad behavior here, after all, and not a chemical dependence on some substance like alcohol or drugs. Every time I see someone on these boards claim to be a sex addict I just want to cringe, but rather than hijack another thread I’ll just ask the question here. Where is the all the evidence for sex addiction? Where are the peer reviewed studies showing sex addiction as a legitimate medical disorder?

Now if thinking that you’re a sex addict helps you control your bad behavior then by all means consider yourself a sex addict. But for everyone else is there any real, solid evidence for treating sex addiction as a legitimate illness in need of treatment?


#2

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Why do so many people accept the sudden sex/porn/masturbation addiction outbreak without a challenge? The American Psychiatric Association doesn’t recognize sexual addiction why should we? We are talking about a bad behavior here, after all, and not a chemical dependence on some substance like alcohol or drugs. Every time I see someone on these boards claim to be a sex addict I just want to cringe, but rather than hijack another thread I’ll just ask the question here. Where is the all the evidence for sex addiction? Where are the peer reviewed studies showing sex addiction as a legitimate medical disorder?

Now if thinking that you’re a sex addict helps you control your bad behavior then by all means consider yourself a sex addict. But for everyone else is there any real, solid evidence for treating sex addiction as a legitimate illness in need of treatment?

[/quote]

lol, south park anyone? its all an alien plot to control our society!!!!


#3

Pornography, and sexual behavior outside of marriage (defined as between one man and one woman) are the real culprits.

Both are MORTAL Sins.

Do NOT receive Holy Communion if you purposely view pornography or indulge in sinful behavior, or encourage impure thoughts.
(See the CCC, 2nd Ed.)


#4

Saying something is an addiction is an easy way to justify its continuation. Any perpetually indulged activity will lead to some form of mental acceptance of the act - even if there is no physical encouragement. It is not that people are addicted per se; but that individuals have habilitised themselves to this activity, in a sense the more "ordinary" the activity, the more likely it is that it will become habilitual. Living in a culture that almost promotes such behaviour it is no surprise that people fall prey to it - not that this justifies the act in any way - but, to call any condition addiction is absurd. There is no compulsion in any "addiction", merely grades of suggestion.

:thumbsup:


#5

I'm not an expert, but I'm pretty sure an orgasm releases edorphins and "feel good" chemicals and "lights up" the reward center of your brain. You can get addicted to your own endorphins (see: thrill seekers, roller coaster addicts, bungee jumping people, etc).

I think it works the same way with sex addiction.


#6

The American Psychiatric Association does not view porn/masturbation as an addiction, because they don’t think (or don’t want to think) think there is anything wrong with it.

As far a a physical addiction, I agree it is not like drugs, alcohol or cigarettes were there is a strong physical addiction that makes you physically ill when you detox.

It is however quite addicting mentally. It does result in your body releasing pleasure inducing endorphins. Over time your brain does require more and more stimulus to get the same “high”. However the fact that there is an addictive aspect to it should not be used as an excuse not to stop.

The most compelling argument that it has addictive properties is that there many many men and women who believe it is 100% wrong and are trying very hard to stop, going to weekly confession, doing spiritual warfare and still have trouble with it. I do agree even though it has addictive aspects, it can be beat, it takes a lot of will power and grace to do it.

Sin of all kinds can be addicting.

Based on your comments it sounds to me like you have never been involved in it. If you yourself are not involved with an addiction it can be very difficult to understand the other side. Be grateful that you are not involved.


#7

That was a good episode.

“We all know the normal healthy male only thinks of sex occasionally and has no desire for sex with multiple partners. But in the sex addict, the mere sight of an attractive woman can cause him to think about sex with her” It’s got to be the aliens. :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

First just because the American Psychiatric Association does not recognize it as an addiction that does not mean that it is not an addiction. Look at all the flip flops that the medical associations have been doing for decades in regard to homosexuality and abortion.

Second, I would tend to trust someone that has the guts to claim something so embarrassing instead of discounting what he says.

Third, the so called sexual addiction might not be an addiction in itself but highly correlated (as in linked to) to some other forms of disorder, and the overall results might look and feel like a sex addiction. In this case counseling to address the primary disorder could allow the elimination of the other bad behaviors.

I am not a psychiatrist or a psychologist and these are just my own considerations


#9

[quote="WatchingMedia, post:3, topic:201513"]
Pornography, and sexual behavior outside of marriage (defined as between one man and one woman) are the real culprits.

[/quote]

As are the acceptance and support of many many immoral tv shows, movies, books, magazines, dress code etc.

IMO if you are watching and laughing at shows like 2.5 Men, South Park, What Women Want, Seinfeld, anything from HBO or Showtime, Will and Grace, Americas Top Model, Sex in the City, Soaps etc. etc ... the viewers of such shows are part of the problem.


#10

[quote="whm, post:9, topic:201513"]
As are the acceptance and support of many many immoral tv shows, movies, books, magazines, dress code etc.

IMO if you are watching and laughing at shows like 2.5 Men, South Park, What Women Want, Seinfeld, anything from HBO or Showtime, Will and Grace, Americas Top Model, Sex in the City, Soaps etc. etc ... the viewers of such shows are part of the problem.

[/quote]

agreed, that and the internet has made pornography anonymous and extremely easy to view. If we had gambling websites accessible 24/7 and casinos on every corner you would likewise see a huge outbreak of gambling addicts.


#11

Yes the casinos do a lot of business, I have never had any kind of temptation to gamble, so can’t really comment on whether it has the same kind of broad “appeal” as sexual sins. I’ve been in a few casinos and it always makes me sad watching all those people giving their money away.:frowning:


#12

:tsktsk:

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Why do so many people accept the sudden sex/porn/masturbation addiction outbreak without a challenge? The American Psychiatric Association doesn’t recognize sexual addiction why should we?

[/quote]

The APA doesn't accept it as an addiction, because they see nothing wrong with it. Most non religious, and even a lot of religious people do it everyday. Can you imagine the histeria they would cause by saying it was an addiction? They would lose all credibility.

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
We are talking about a bad behavior here, after all, and not a chemical dependence on some substance like alcohol or drugs.

[/quote]

As it has been pointed out GaryJohn, your brain is hardwired for it.

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Every time I see someone on these boards claim to be a sex addict I just want to cringe, but rather than hijack another thread I’ll just ask the question here.

[/quote]

So your unsympathetic for someone who recognizes they have a problem, and want to stop? Ok then.

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Where is the all the evidence for sex addiction? Where are the peer reviewed studies showing sex addiction as a legitimate medical disorder?

[/quote]

Is there any evidence against it becoming an addiction? No, its just become socially acceptable. That is not evidence, thats laziness.

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Now if thinking that you’re a sex addict helps you control your bad behavior then by all means consider yourself a sex addict. But for everyone else is there any real, solid evidence for treating sex addiction as a legitimate illness in need of treatment?

[/quote]

So, once again I see you don't really care. "Its the person's fault, not mine." I'm sure Pilate felt the same way. Solid evidence? How about thousands who say they are addicted? Those that want to stop. You have no evidence that it isn't an addiction.

Pray for the addicted people, they truly need help.


#13

Just because the medical society does not call it an addiction has NOTHING to do with it. Think of all the alcoholics that suffered 100 years ago because it was not considered a disease. They had to ‘fight’ for their right to get help. When I was a kid in the 70s, no one ever heard of nut allergies. Now children aren’t allow to bring peanut butter sandwiches to school. I have to wonder how many kids who died ‘cause unknown’ actually died of a nut allergy.

To be honest (unless you are not wording you question properly) you seem to be dismissing anyone who wants help for a serious problem and I find that VERY cold hearted. To be honest, it even makes me wonder if deep down you are trying to convince yourself there is nothing wrong with your sexual activity.

As a woman, I am very offended about the degradation of women. And when I see a man who is willing to admit HE is the one with the problem I think he should receive help upon help upon help upon help. Men who admit to their addictions and correct their behaviour are the REAL men.

I don’t mean to come across as so harsh but I just feel I need to stick up for these guys. Why be so hard on them because you personally don’t agree with the word addiction?

CM


#14

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:1, topic:201513"]
Why do so many people accept the sudden sex/porn/masturbation addiction outbreak without a challenge? The American Psychiatric Association doesn’t recognize sexual addiction why should we? We are talking about a bad behavior here, after all, and not a chemical dependence on some substance like alcohol or drugs. Every time I see someone on these boards claim to be a sex addict I just want to cringe, but rather than hijack another thread I’ll just ask the question here. Where is the all the evidence for sex addiction? Where are the peer reviewed studies showing sex addiction as a legitimate medical disorder?

Now if thinking that you’re a sex addict helps you control your bad behavior then by all means consider yourself a sex addict. But for everyone else is there any real, solid evidence for treating sex addiction as a legitimate illness in need of treatment?

[/quote]

Because not all psychologists agree that sex addiction is a myth. The brain releases the same powerful chemicals whether a person masturbates to porn, has sex with an string of anonymous strangers or his/her own spouse. Drug addicts are addicted to artificial chemicals that mimic the same pleasure chemicals that exist in our brains Read the works of Dr Norman Doidge and Dr. Patrick Cairns (you can google them) and you will find not all psychologists agree that sex addiction is a myth. I think the diagnostic chart that psychologists use and upgrade every few years is sometimes politically motivated.

Porn has never beenr as accessible as it is today. And the degree of degrading porn on the internet is growing by the day. It seems easy for people to slip into a porn addiction because it is available at the click of a mouse.


#15

See how smart the Chruch is !
No porn; no addiction to porn. :thumbsup:

There is no excuse for bad behavior.
Viewing porn (purposefully) is a mortal sin.


#16

[quote="KostyaJMJ, post:10, topic:201513"]
agreed, that and the internet has made pornography anonymous and extremely easy to view. If we had gambling websites accessible 24/7 and casinos on every corner you would likewise see a huge outbreak of gambling addicts.

[/quote]

This is completely true, and I feel the jist of it all! SEX is everywhere in our society! It's IMO, only the strong and Godly man who can resist it's pull. More reason to go to Mass often, Pray the Rosary daily, Adoration, etc. People need Jesus to be able to live in the world but not OF the world.

My husband, unfortunately feels the pull of our sex-filled society everywhere we go. He oagles scantily clad women in public everywhere......as if that's all he thinks about it. I'm pretty tired of this, after 22 years of it, you'd think he'd outgrow this behavior. He hasn't. It really has made me lose respect for him. Not to mention also once or twice one of my children caught him watching a porn at home, and also once looking in the adult section of our local video store.......:(
It's so hard being married to a man you've lost all respect for......:(what's a Catholic to do?
What do some of you wives do if your husband views porn?????and does nothing to overcome it? How do you women feel about this?

It is so prevalent today even among pastors, youth leaders, priests, teachers, etc.......To me it is a big deal. It causes a huge wedge in marriage, I know first hand this.


#17

It is unfortunate to see so many people who don't understand this type of addiction.

The plethora of porn options has only exaccerbated the problem. Before I sought help (in recovery for 3 years,) I gave myself a little test to see if I had a problem. No porn for 30 days. I made it 5 days - before I found an excuse to watch it again. I succeeded in my second attempt, but white-knuckled my way through it. I knew I had a problem at that point.

The amazing thing is, at that time, I was a casual Catholic, and as my recovery grew, so did my faith. I have led dozens of men (the women's SA was across the hall,...and yes, they do exist) in recovery meetings and I can say unequivoculy that it is real, probelmatic and tragic.

Confession, adoration and my new relationship with our Blessed Mother have - and continue to - help me greatly.

I still battle with it, but am getting better. I even started a recovery blog www.mydarkpassengerandme.blogspot.com

*Pls be forwarned: This is a diarist-form blog and some strong language and feelings are expressed. Trigger alerts for SA's


#18

[quote="Corinne3, post:16, topic:201513"]
This is completely true, and I feel the jist of it all! SEX is everywhere in our society! It's IMO, only the strong and Godly man who can resist it's pull. More reason to go to Mass often, Pray the Rosary daily, Adoration, etc. People need Jesus to be able to live in the world but not OF the world.

My husband, unfortunately feels the pull of our sex-filled society everywhere we go. He oagles scantily clad women in public everywhere......as if that's all he thinks about it. I'm pretty tired of this, after 22 years of it, you'd think he'd outgrow this behavior. He hasn't. It really has made me lose respect for him. Not to mention also once or twice one of my children caught him watching a porn at home, and also once looking in the adult section of our local video store.......:(
It's so hard being married to a man you've lost all respect for......:(what's a Catholic to do?
What do some of you wives do if your husband views porn?????and does nothing to overcome it? How do you women feel about this?

It is so prevalent today even among pastors, youth leaders, priests, teachers, etc.......To me it is a big deal. It causes a huge wedge in marriage, I know first hand this.

[/quote]

I'm in a very similar situation to yours, Corrine, but my husband has improved somewhat over the past year, thank the Lord. You might want to join the women's support group here at CAF called "Women Suffering Because of Unchastity." It has helped me tremendously and offers some great suggestions for dealing with it from a wife's standpoint.

You are SO right - it IS a very big deal in a marriage and does cause a loss of respect for the spouse. Some men don't quite understand that at all, unfortunately.

Sending a prayer for strength for you!


#19

[quote="WatchingMedia, post:15, topic:201513"]
See how smart the Chruch is !
No porn; no addiction to porn. :thumbsup:

There is no excuse for bad behavior.
Viewing porn (purposefully) is a mortal sin.

[/quote]

I am sorry that I am kind of ranting here with this post. But I am trying to work a few out for which I have strong and conflicting feelings about.

Another contributing factor (to porn problems) is the watering down of the Church's teaching on marital values and the lack of teaching on the sins against marriage. The contraceptive mentality ( including abusive use of NFP) has made sex more about pleasure and bonding (which used to be secondary not primary) rather than about the simple truth that is for creating new life (hint that is why it is pleasurable). Real authentic sex is now optional, no consequence sex is now the norm.

50 years ago catechisms and examinations of conscience listed refusing a spouse relations without good reason (very strict list or reasons ie danger of death or current infidelity) was a mortal sin. You would have a hard time finding this in any modern materials. Why? perhaps because it incompatible with things such as NFP. I am not saying that men have nor should be excused from porn problems because of their spouse refusing relations, but that we live in a society where both spouses have never been taught the about what is right and wrong in marriage. Neither party seems to know that after marriage their body is no longer their own. A man (or women) who uses porn thinks they have a right for their bodies to provide themselves pleasure. In marriage your spouse has a right to your body. Your body does not have a right to pleasure in an of itself (whether thru porn or acting out lust for one's own spouse).

One thing that seems to surprise me is the amount of outrage about porn (very justified) compared to the lack of any kind of outrage regarding the us of the pill(need more outrage). They are both very similar in my eyes.

Again sorry for ranting a little.


#20

[quote="whm, post:19, topic:201513"]
I am sorry that I am kind of ranting here with this post. But I am trying to work a few out for which I have strong and conflicting feelings about.

Another contributing factor (to porn problems) is the watering down of the Church's teaching on marital values and the lack of teaching on the sins against marriage. The contraceptive mentality ( including abusive use of NFP) has made sex more about pleasure and bonding (which used to be secondary not primary) rather than about the simple truth that is for creating new life (hint that is why it is pleasurable). Real authentic sex is now optional, no consequence sex is now the norm.

50 years ago catechisms and examinations of conscience listed refusing a spouse relations without good reason (very strict list or reasons ie danger of death or current infidelity) was a mortal sin. You would have a hard time finding this in any modern materials. Why? perhaps because it incompatible with things such as NFP. I am not saying that men have nor should be excused from porn problems because of their spouse refusing relations, but that we live in a society where both spouses have never been taught the about what is right and wrong in marriage. Neither party seems to know that after marriage their body is no longer their own. A man (or women) who uses porn thinks they have a right for their bodies to provide themselves pleasure. In marriage your spouse has a right to your body. Your body does not have a right to pleasure in an of itself (whether thru porn or acting out lust for one's own spouse).

One thing that seems to surprise me is the amount of outrage about porn (very justified) compared to the lack of any kind of outrage regarding the us of the pill(need more outrage). They are both very similar in my eyes.

Again sorry for ranting a little.

[/quote]

How many men never looked at porn until they got married and found that they weren't going to have sexual relations as often as they would like? I don't believe that a man who has never made women mere objects of his desires just magically starts doing that after marriage. Just as rape is not primarily about sex, and therefore is not cured by finding the rapist a wife, pornography is not going to be cured when every husband is guaranteed to have relations with his wife whenever he feels like it.

How many couples use NFP to avoid future pregnancies over the objections of the husband? Some, undoubtedly, but really...how many?

Periodic continence is not a violation of mutual self-giving. Rather, it is inevitable that some married persons are not going to engage in sex with their spouses as often as they would like to. Sometimes, they will need to be continent when both might desire otherwise, because conditions outside their control make it impossible to find the ability and privacy necessary for the act.

The burden of self-denial does not rest entirely on the spouse that desires sexual relations less often, then. Rather, the selflessness of sexual giving is shared equally between the one who desires sex less often and the one who would like it more often. Sometimes, spouses have to deny themselves when neither one wants to. The decision of how often to have sex has to be arrived at by mutual willingness to sacrifice one's own preferences.

So you are right: porn comes about when people think sex is about personal gratification. Yes, people can abuse NFP to make sex purely about personal gratification, but I think it fair to say that was the personal problem going in, a spiritual fault that NFP doesn't automatically cure, not a problem that NFP itself causes.

**CCC 2370 **Periodic continence, that is, the methods of birth regulation based on self-observation and the use of infertile periods, is in conformity with the objective criteria of morality.157 These methods respect the bodies of the spouses, encourage tenderness between them, and favor the education of an authentic freedom. In contrast, "every action which, whether in anticipation of the conjugal act, or in its accomplishment, or in the development of its natural consequences, proposes, whether as an end or as a means, to render procreation impossible" is intrinsically evil:158

Thus the innate language that expresses the total reciprocal self-giving of husband and wife is overlaid, through contraception, by an objectively contradictory language, namely, that of not giving oneself totally to the other. This leads not only to a positive refusal to be open to life but also to a falsification of the inner truth of conjugal love, which is called upon to give itself in personal totality. . . . The difference, both anthropological and moral, between contraception and recourse to the rhythm of the cycle . . . involves in the final analysis two irreconcilable concepts of the human person and of human sexuality.159


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