Sexiness a Must for Today's Lady Singers

tinyurl.com/2kv6mb

Sexiness a Must for Today’s Lady Singers

Plain Janes Need Not Apply: for Today’s Female Singers, Sex Appeal Is a Must

By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY AP Music Writer
NEW YORK May 17, 2007 (AP)

She was an “amazing talent,” a young singer with a wonderful voice who wrote beautiful songs. But she was no beauty, plus flat-chested and overweight to boot.
Remembering the aspiring star, music executive Jody Gerson still feels terrible about thinking: “She’s never going to get signed, even though she’s fabulous.”

Gerson might feel even worse after Wednesday night’s exit of the matronly Melinda Doolittle from “American Idol.” In today’s music industry, Plain Janes need not apply. Sex appeal was once considered a bonus for a woman; now it’s practically a requirement.

. . . . . .

A quick check of the Billboard Top 40 turns up a list of candidates for “America’s Top Model”: Avril Lavigne, blonde stunner Carrie Underwood; tomboyish but sexy Ciara, fashionista Gwen Stefani and hip-swiveling Shakira (on a song featuring bootylicious Beyonce).
The only two in the Top 40 who might not be considered perfect 10s: Pink, who is still svelte and appealing; and multiplatinum Grammy-winner Kelly Clarkson, who got her break only through winning the democratically elected "American Idol."
When asked whether a female with so-so looks and sex appeal could get a record deal, Gretchen Wilson quickly replied: “They can’t.”

File this under “sad but true”. Male singers can still be ugly as sin and I can remember when not all female musicians were sexpots – Janis Joplin being an extreme case.
I wonder how much good music we’re missing out on.
**
**

I don’t think Melinda Doolitte was “non-sexy” at all.

Especially in the African American culture, many women are considered sexy that white people would not consider sexy.

A lot of black women are “chubby” by white standards, yet these women do not seem to have the stigma of “fat” or “ugly.” I have work friends who are obese by “white” standards, but are beautiful and sexy by “black” standards. I really enjoy being around these women because they are so accepting of themselves. They don’t spend time beating themselves up because they have a big butt or a case of acne.

I personally envy this aspect of African American culture, and I also agree with it. Sexiness is not appearance, it’s an “attitude” of acceptance of one’s self.

Kelly Clarkson is wearing a bit less in her videos so I think that even she must feel the pressure to be “sexy.”

We have young people who are willing to portray themselves as simple, empty carictures of their particular gender, race or sexuality.

It seems that the worst behavior a young lady exhibits, the more famous a singer she will become.

I sort of wonder if any of this is actually ‘sexy’ or just vulgar and classless. When I think of sexy, I think of Lauren Bacall.(yes, I misspelled her last name) Paris Hilton, Brittany SPears etc. just seem trashy.:frowning:

It’s true, and it’s a great shame. You see it over and over. I’ve seen kids start out (like on the Disney Channel). They have their first hit, and the next time you see them, they’re half-naked and performing sexual dances.

Fame ruins people.

One of our local disc jockeys described Melinda Doolittle as “Princess Fiona” (the Shrek character). Now, wasn’t that sweet? :rolleyes:

He flat out said she wouldn’t win AI because of her looks not because of her talent. I predicted to my dh that she’d be voted off and that it’d come down to Jordin and Blake because Melinda is not young enough or pretty enough to win.

Modern American music is all about sex and nothing else. Being able to fulfill some man’s sexual dreams is all that counts in a female singer. I’m afraid Melinda is going to have a couple of years of fame and then have to sing gospel in order to have an audience. Certainly the mainline producers aren’t going to want her any more because she isn’t marketable in the current atmosphere of “woman as slut” that is all that seems to attract an audience.

Actually you got the spelling right :wink: And right on for the rest of it too, in my opinion. Sexy isn’t about how much or how little one is wearing; Bogart’s or Lamarr’s lips alone are more sexy than Teenybopperbot 3X71 entirely naked.

I disagree that Melinda won’t sell albums.

There’s an awful lot of people that still buy albums by older female singers like Barbra Streisand and Gladys Knight and even Aretha Franklin. Good music will sell.

I do think it’s interesting that the up-and-coming classical music acts nowadays are “sexy.” A lot of trios of young women dressed to go to bed, holding their cellos and violins. You just don’t see too many dumpy, homely concert pianists nowadays!

And even opera is getting into the act. The age of the huge prima dona is over. Rene Fleming is HOT! And some of the men’s groups are to drool over, they’re so good looking!

But I still think good music sells.

I don’t find this surprising at all; it’s just a continuation of a trend.

For years, male news anchors have been able to look like your great-uncle Egbert, but female news anchors have to look like young movie stars.

Double standard, no? :rolleyes:

Mudgie-in-training and freelance sparkle/coffee grinds sprinkler

Sheesh guys it’s not news. Plenty of tests have been done with males, females, even babies, which shows that attractive people get a positive reaction.

For example, babies stared longer at attractive photos in one study. Or in another study, married men were asked to look at attractive women and ended up rating their relationships/partners lower than men who looked at unattractive women.

It’s been hypothesized that the shape of a man’s jaw will affect the way women interact with him.

In the workplace, skinny, attractive people are promoted more often and make more money. Especially in sales or high-profile positions such as law/politics.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.