Shorter Christian Prayer & Magnificat


#1

I have come across a book called, Shorter Christian Prayer. How do I use it? Is it a version of the Liturgy of the Hours? Is the magazine, Magnificat, a version of the Hours?

Thanks & Merry Christmas as I continue my Catholic faith walk.

Eric


#2

The Shorter Christian Prayer is really meant as a “traveler’s version” of Christian Prayer. It has the complete Morning, Evening and Night Prayers, but only a minimum of prayers for Feasts and Solemnities and has no Memorials at all.


#3

MAGNIFICAT is not a version of the LOTH. Shorter Christian Prayer is a reduced version of the LOTH that has mostly Morning and Evening Prayer, It may or may not, depending on who published it, have ALL of Morning and Evening Prayer.

If you are interested in the LOTH, I would suggest the full CHRISTIAN PRAYER. Also buy a copy of the book THE DIVINE OFFICE FOR DODOS. DODOS = Devout Obediant Disciples of Our Savior. :slight_smile: Disclaimer:, the author is a good friend of mine:rolleyes:


#4

Hi Eric.
I would say yes to both Quetions.
I use Christian Prayer:the one volume of The Liturgy of the Hours. It contains:
Morning Prayer
Daytine prayer
(selections)
Evening Prayer
Night Prayer
Office of Readings.
(selections)

If you are just starting, I would recomend it. (Catholic book Publishing Corp. New York):thumbsup:Merry Christmas, Carlan


#5

I am going to suggest an alternative plan, esp. if you are new to LOTH and still in the process of trying to establish regular prayer time in your life. If you already have Magnificat or SCP, or any other Catholic devotional that has a prayer or reflection for morning and evening, stick with it for a while. First work on the regular habit of morning and evening prayer. With Magnificat you just follow along for each day, and it has the added bonus of a short saint story and a reflection that can be used by lay people in place of the Office of Readings, and of course the Mass readings for the day, perfect for starting the habit of scriptural prayer, lectio divina.

When that has become a routine, it usually awakens a desire for more, full LOTH, and SCP is the easiest most inexpensive way to begin to pray the psalms with the Church. In my experience in formation of Benedictine Oblates, it takes at least a full year to make it a firm habit and to learn the rhythms of the psalm cycle and seasons. I have seen too many people invest in the more expensive books before they understand the how and why of LOTH and before it has become a habit, and then never use the books (that is how I acquired my set). If it is still too confusing, simply start praying the 4 week psalter (arrangement of psalms over a 4 week cycle without worrying "what day are we on". Although you can usually go on line to Universalis or other sites to find that out. In fact if you have little money, that is a great way to start LOTH with no investment, but most of us like to have a book for chapel and travel time.

This in turn leads to a desire for more, for the seasonal prayers and readings, for the Office of Readings, for the observation of solemnities and feasts etc. When that happens try to find a group or chapel where LOTH is prayed regularly so you can join and learn from those who do it right. The book referenced above is excellent BTW

read the introductory and explanatory material in any version you get--most questions I've seen here come from people who have simply not read it. But it is hard to follow unless you know the logic and organization of the hours. But if you start out with a big expensive book, lots of page turning, and no one to help you, you risk getting confused and discouraged and end up just dropping the whole thing.


#6

[quote="puzzleannie, post:5, topic:180786"]
I am going to suggest an alternative plan, esp. if you are new to LOTH and still in the process of trying to establish regular prayer time in your life. If you already have Magnificat or SCP, or any other Catholic devotional that has a prayer or reflection for morning and evening, stick with it for a while. First work on the regular habit of morning and evening prayer. With Magnificat you just follow along for each day, and it has the added bonus of a short saint story and a reflection that can be used by lay people in place of the Office of Readings, and of course the Mass readings for the day, perfect for starting the habit of scriptural prayer, lectio divina.

When that has become a routine, it usually awakens a desire for more, full LOTH, and SCP is the easiest most inexpensive way to begin to pray the psalms with the Church. In my experience in formation of Benedictine Oblates, it takes at least a full year to make it a firm habit and to learn the rhythms of the psalm cycle and seasons. I have seen too many people invest in the more expensive books before they understand the how and why of LOTH and before it has become a habit, and then never use the books (that is how I acquired my set). If it is still too confusing, simply start praying the 4 week psalter (arrangement of psalms over a 4 week cycle without worrying "what day are we on". Although you can usually go on line to Universalis or other sites to find that out. In fact if you have little money, that is a great way to start LOTH with no investment, but most of us like to have a book for chapel and travel time.

This in turn leads to a desire for more, for the seasonal prayers and readings, for the Office of Readings, for the observation of solemnities and feasts etc. When that happens try to find a group or chapel where LOTH is prayed regularly so you can join and learn from those who do it right. The book referenced above is excellent BTW

read the introductory and explanatory material in any version you get--most questions I've seen here come from people who have simply not read it. But it is hard to follow unless you know the logic and organization of the hours. But if you start out with a big expensive book, lots of page turning, and no one to help you, you risk getting confused and discouraged and end up just dropping the whole thing.

[/quote]

Wonderful direction, P, Annie, This is the exact direction my daughter took over time. L OTH, is such a blessing to her life. She is faithful, she got me started. What a blessing!:love:Thanks Annie, Carlan


#7

Brothers & Sisters in Christ,
Thanks for your guidance and advice! Merry Christmas!

Pax,
Eric


#8

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