Should catholics who disagree with Church teaching receive the Eucharist?

Specifically, if a catholic supports gay marriage, a woman’s right to choose and other hot button issues, but does not directly engage in such acts, would such a Catholic be able to receive the Eucharist worthily?

Absolutely not.

Probably.

We receive the Eucharist because we believe it is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Jesus Christ.

We believe this on the authority of the Church. If we disbelieve the Church, and do not accept Her teaching, why should we receive? That’s called lying to yourself.

And no, the Church does not allow those who openly object to her teachings to partake of the Eucharist, because that is a mortal sin.

:thumbsup:

Definitely not; one mortal sin should not be compounded by another.

These individuals have been asked at least once by leading Catholic clergy to excuse themselves from Communion.

For me, the question is any of us ever worthy to receive such a gift? :blush:

There is not a simple answer here. A lot would depend on the disposition of the person, whether or not they know and understand the actual teaching on the matter, and whether or not one is seeking spiritual guidance or not. Sadly, many people (I know, I was one of them) fall into what are I call “cultural Catholicism”, they were born into it, and it’s expected that you “do” certain things (the Sacraments), as rites of passage. Add to that the abysmal catechesis of the 1970’s & 80’s in my little corner of the world, and you get a diocese full of people just like me.

I had what you might call a “reversion” ( I call it a metanoia- a profound change of heart), and started to study the faith, and even started pursuing a Master’s degree in Theology. I came to understand many things I had believed were at odds with being Catholic, and I sought to seek understanding. I was lucky to have found a very kind & patient priest to guide me, who never once suggested that I refrain from receiving the Eucharist, unless I knew 100% that I was in a state of mortal sin. He reminded me that we are NEVER WORTHY! We even say so, just before we receive!

It is through the Eucharist that we become one with Christ, and to become Him for others. It is the source & summit of our faith, it is not a “prize” for good behavior.

A Catholic must believe all that the Church teaches on Faith and morals. One might not understand or may struggle with a particular doctrine but they should seek to understand. But even as they seek to understand they must acknowledge that the Church is infallible and is correct. But if one does not believe in the issues you mention then they should not receive communion.

No, they should not. Such a person is no different than Catholic politicians who dissent on Church teaching. Raymond Cardinal Burke has stated on more than one occasion that those politicians should not present themselves for Holy Communion and their bishops should deny them Communion for their own spiritual benefit if they do.

A person who denies the truths taught by the Church denies Christ himself.

To the OP: A person who has explicitly decided that he is right and the Church is wrong should absolutely not recieve. A person who simply feels troubled by the Church’s teachings, but has not decided to explicitly reject them or work against them may recieve (though he should work to resolve this conflict).

So it depends on what you mean by disagree and “doesn’t do anything about it”. If you mean his gut tells him the Church is wrong, but in deference to the Church being the Church, he overrules his gut, then that is not a problem as far as recieving communion goes (though it is a problem and one that should be resolved). If you mean, however, that he explicitly and actively says the Church is wrong, but just doesn’t work to advance these causes, then that is a problem for recieving.

Depends on what you mean by worthy. None of us can claim that we have earned the gift, but that does not change that there are dispositions in which it is appropriate to recieve the gift and those in which it is not.

There is not a simple answer here. A lot would depend on the disposition of the person, whether or not they know and understand the actual teaching on the matter, and whether or not one is seeking spiritual guidance or not. Sadly, many people (I know, I was one of them) fall into what are I call “cultural Catholicism”, they were born into it, and it’s expected that you “do” certain things (the Sacraments), as rites of passage. Add to that the abysmal catechesis of the 1970’s & 80’s in my little corner of the world, and you get a diocese full of people just like me.

I had what you might call a “reversion” ( I call it a metanoia- a profound change of heart), and started to study the faith, and even started pursuing a Master’s degree in Theology. I came to understand many things I had believed were at odds with being Catholic, and I sought to seek understanding. I was lucky to have found a very kind & patient priest to guide me, who never once suggested that I refrain from receiving the Eucharist, unless I knew 100% that I was in a state of mortal sin. He reminded me that we are NEVER WORTHY! We even say so, just before we receive!

It is through the Eucharist that we become one with Christ, and to become Him for others. It is the source & summit of our faith, it is not a “prize” for good behavior.

I mostly agree with you, but it is worth pointing out that if we say that murdering childern is ok, then we know 100% that we are placing ourself against the teachings of God. It is not a matter of whether or not I have been good enough to recieve, but there are some definite things that would make recieving Communion a lie, since by the act we claim communion with the Church.

If we have put our own opinions on such a high pedestal that we value them more than what the Holy Spirit has revealed to us through the Church, or if we have decided that when the Church says something that the Holy Spirit has revealed is false, then such communion doesn’t exist.

But again, this is if one explicitly rejects what the Church teaches. If one merely struggles with it, that is a different matter.

I don’t think private dissent is grounds for excommunication. However, if one puts on a show about it, then yes, they probably should not go to communion.

a woman’s right to choose

Right to choose what?

I agree with the others that it’s not totally cut and dry, but presuming the person is aware of such Church teaching and obstinately denies it, then they should not receive. The sacrament is called “Communion” in part because the person, by receiving, is expressing communion with the Church and Church teaching. By rejecting Church dogma, a person could “excommunicate” themselves and render themselves unworthy of receipt. They would also be “lying” by receiving, because receiving expresses communion.

See Canon Law here:*Can. 1364 An apostate from the faith, a heretic or a schismatic incurs a latae sententiae excommunication.*So what is an apostate, heretic, or schismatic?*Can. 751 Heresy is the obstinate denial or doubt, after baptism, of a truth which must be believed by divine and catholic faith. Apostasy is the total repudiation of the christian faith. Schism is the withdrawal of submission to the Supreme Pontiff or from communion with the members of the Church subject to him.
*

“Catholic” implies adhering, or at least trying to adhere, to a set of beliefs. By willfully, knowingly refusing to accept the teaching of the Church, one is refusing to be in communion with the Church. Then, to seek out “communion” is a contradiction.

If there is doubt on such matters, why not go to confession and/or ask a priest?

No. It is specifically addressed within Catholic teaching and to deny the dogma of the Church should prevent one from partaking of the Eucharist until they realize their wrong and confess, as required by the Church.

It seems clear to me and others that the key to the thread question lies with the true and full definition of the meanings implicit in the word - COMMUNION {common identity of belief, included].

Probably not, though it is God alone who can assess their conscience. This said, when we say “Amen” at the time we receive Holy Communion we are saying we agree with and accept the teaching of God’s Church. I sometimes don’t think people are aware of this because they may not know the full significance of the Eucharist.

A Priest told me that we can condemn ourselves when receiving Holy Communion, precisely because of the above. The “Amen” is not an empty ritualistic response. It carries great implications of agreement with the Church and our Lord. One is not to receive the Eucharist knowing they are guilty of mortal sin, and certainly I think it would be foolish to do so if you are in disagreement with a teaching of the Church.

freep.com/article/20130408/NEWS05/304080041/

Peace,
Ed

One may not receive in a state of moral sin or under excommunication but disagreeing with Church teachings isn’t necessarily either of those. Otherwise, a lot of priests wouldn’t be able to receive Communion.

Can. 1364 An apostate from the faith, a heretic or a schismatic incurs a latae sententiae excommunication.

Can. 751 Heresy is the obstinate denial or doubt, after baptism, of a truth which must be believed by divine and catholic faith. Apostasy is the total repudiation of the christian faith. Schism is the withdrawal of submission to the Supreme Pontiff or from communion with the members of the Church subject to him.

In order to incur latae sententiae excommunication for heresy, it must be “obstinate,” i.e., formal. In general, mere heretical thoughts don’t qualify. Also the Church teaching must be one believed “by divine and catholic faith,” i.e., the teaching must be infallible. Unfortunately, it’s not always clear what is infallible and what isn’t so the controversial issues will still be controversial in this context.

Dissent can be a mortal sin even if it doesn’t rise to the level of heresy. You can withhold assent from fallible teachings but you may not dissent. E.g., publicly preach that the teaching may be disregarded. If it satisfies the usual conditions, it may be a mortal sin.

In short, it’s complicated.

It all depends. First, what does “supports” mean?

If a Catholic was struggling internally with their belief in “gay marriage, a woman’s right to choose and other hot button issues” and doing their best to reject such matters, I don’t see a problem with them receiving communion based specifically on these beliefs. There is no mortal sin that I can see.

On the other hand if they take part in homosexual marriages, donate $ and time to Planned Parenthood, etc. then no, they should not.

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