Should I complete RCIA?


#1

Greetings,

I've found myself at a previously unforseen crossroad, where I'm uncertain as to wether or not I should continue with and complete (be confirmed) the RCIA program.

I've grown up Protestant, but upon feeling lost among all the many churches, chose to seek out Catholicism and learn about it. There are many things I like, certain things I don't, however, I understand the church's authority (historically speaking), the value of tradition, etc. At the same time, however, there are certain concepts that I cannot, no matter how hard I've tried, accept as truth, replacing my previous beliefs.

A few of these concepts are:

A) Mary's divinity. We assume she was a perfect being, because had she of not been, Jesus would have been a victim of original sin. The logic sounds great, however, it seems like an assumption. Why could God not make an exception, in Christ's birth, sparing him (without any involvement of Mary) from sin?

B) Mary's death (or not). We assume that she never died, but was taken up into heaven. We believe this because we believe she was a perfect being (see above), but also, because there appears to be no records of her death. We assume, then, that she never died, and thus, is a very special person, not simply a virgin.

C) Eucharist. We assume/interpret/whatever that when Jesus said "This is my body, given up for you..." "...do this in rememberence of me", that he was literally saying, we were to believe we were consuming the real flesh and blood of Christ. I've spoken to some who believe in a physical transformation (e.g., the wine becomes blood, the cracker becomes flesh), despite this obviously not happening, while others believe, without actually saying it, there's a certain amount of symbolism involved (as I've always believed, Jesus's blood is represented by wine, juice, whatever).

D) Mass. We believe that Mass is a mandatory thing. Though I believe regular attendance is good, I think to blindly show up, if not focused on God, misses the point. It's like people who just go to church on Sundays, because it makes them feel like a good person, however, they sleep, talk, play on their phones, etc, instead of focusing on the materials. Though ritual attendance can be good, it becomes a pointless endeavor if the individuals do not seek anything from it. With this in mind, I've always believed that God is more concerned about the individual, and having a relationship with Him. I've always believed that God doesn't care WHEN you go to Church, or WHERE you go to Church, as long as you attempt to seek spiritual growth through fellowship with others whom are God's children. I enjoy the flexibility that God has always given me, and have yet to feel convicted that my going to Mass, on say, a Tuesday, as opposed to going Sunday morning, is some horrible, awful thing, that seperates me from God.

E) Saints. We assume (as it was explained to me, so if I'm incorrect, please re-explain), that because the dead go to Heaven, and are "alive" in Christ, that we can communicate them through prayer, including prayers of intercession, to Mary, or other Saints. There is nothing which backs this idea in the Bible, to my knowledge, however, we feel good in thinking that the dead are not truly gone, until we see them again, and can utilize their services, and receive aid from them.

There are probably some others, but those are the main ones that come to mind.

With that said, I'm obviously unable to accept all of the Church's teachings as accurate, but rather, I interpret them as theories, ideas, etc, just as other churches have them. Though the Catholi Church is the original church, the church founded by Jesus Christ, I do not believe this enables the Church to be completely correct in terms of doctrine and theology. I believe, that someday, when Christ returns, He will likely clarify some of the things that were misunderstood, misinterpretated, etc.

I had hoped to become a Catholic, and have some divine experience (as is often heard "I was once lost, but then found Jesus!"), but thus far, have felt no divine presence, outside of my normal relationship with God. I do not feel any more certain with the Catholic church, than I did with other churches, however, given that I believe in a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, I believe that relationship is more important than what particular church and doctrines I subscribe to.

I've explained this to my sponsor, whom was quick to tell me that I should not be confirmed, because it would go against the requirements in doing so. I had thought that, perhaps, by being confirmed, it would positively influence my spiritual life (as sampling different churches, having talks with many people, etc) has had for the better. I thought that by, being confirmed Catholic, while still holding on to some of my Protestant roots, I would have a more intimate relationship with Jesus Christ, with the Father, the Holy Spirit, and with all of those around me.

What should I do? Do I proceed with becoming a Catholic, thus making me into a Catholic/Protestant mix, (essentially, just a "Christian"), or should I stay being Protestant. Hell, (pardon my language), I don't even consider myself Protestant. To be protestant, is to PROTEST something. I do not protest anything, but rather, am open to many different things, and believe in those little things (doctrines, theologies, etc) as building blocks for a personal and unique faith with my maker.

Please advise. I need guidance as to how to proceed with this.


#2

[quote=jasphair;6086600certain concepts that I cannot, no matter how hard I've tried, accept as truth, replacing my previous beliefs.]The problem is that you are arguing an error. Catholics do not believe Mary is divine. Perfection does not equal divinity; never did. Eve was created sinless too but chose to sin.
[/quote]

B) Mary's death (or not). We assume that she never died, but was taken up into heaven. We believe this because we believe she was a perfect being (see above), but also, because there appears to be no records of her death.. Elijah was taken up to heaven in a fiery chariot so he never died either. The point is, whether Mary experienced physical death or not does not make a difference in Catholic teaching. In fact, we do not make a pronouncement one way or the other.

C) Eucharist. We assume/interpret/whatever that when Jesus said "This is my body, given up for you..." "...do this in rememberence of me", that he was literally saying, we were to believe we were consuming the real flesh and blood of Christ. I've spoken to some who believe in a physical transformation (e.g., the wine becomes blood, the cracker becomes flesh), despite this obviously not happening, while others believe, without actually saying it, there's a certain amount of symbolism involved (as I've always believed, Jesus's blood is represented by wine, juice, whatever). Stick with what the Church actually teaches it, not what some 'think'. The literal teaching has been held since the time of the apostles. The bread and wine retain the appearance of bread and wine (the accidents) but there is a true, real transformation whereby it becomes the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity, of Christ. Remember, His Body is GLORIFIED now and capable of such miraculous effect.

D) Mass. We believe that Mass is a mandatory thing. Though I believe regular attendance is good, I think to blindly show up, if not focused on God, misses the point. (edited) I enjoy the flexibility that God has always given me, and have yet to feel convicted that my going to Mass, on say, a Tuesday, as opposed to going Sunday morning, is some horrible, awful thing, that seperates me from God. Do you insist that in order to breathe 'properly' you need to be absolutely mindful all the time? Do you insist that in order to properly appreciate food you need to savor every mouthful of every thing you eat? And finally, does God operate on what you 'personally believe' or should you be adjusting your 'personal ' and fallible beliefs to what God actually says through His authority--the Church? Notice how often you're talking of YOU throughout your paragraph and how God is only mentioned in how you THINK He SHOULD be. . .

E) Saints. We assume (as it was explained to me, so if I'm incorrect, please re-explain), that because the dead go to Heaven, and are "alive" in Christ, that we can communicate them through prayer, including prayers of intercession, to Mary, or other Saints. There is nothing which backs this idea in the Bible, to my knowledge, however, we feel good in thinking that the dead are not truly gone, until we see them again, and can utilize their services, and receive aid from them. God is God of the living, not the dead. it's right in the Bible along with the fact that the prayers of the saints and the actual sightings of the bodies of many (in the white garments) who are spoken of as the saints are there, and they aren't sleeping, and they obviously 'hear' through God's grace the prayers of us the living. . .

(edited)

given that I believe in a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, I believe that relationship is more important than what particular church and doctrines I subscribe to. You're making a false separation. It is not "the relationship OR the Church; it is the relationship AND the Church.'

I've explained this to my sponsor, whom was quick to tell me that I should not be confirmed, because it would go against the requirements in doing so. I had thought that, perhaps, by being confirmed, it would positively influence my spiritual life (as sampling different churches, having talks with many people, etc) has had for the better. I thought that by, being confirmed Catholic, while still holding on to some of my Protestant roots, I would have a more intimate relationship with Jesus Christ, with the Father, the Holy Spirit, and with all of those around me. In other words, you want to take whatever parts you like of the Catholic faith, ignore the rest, continue with the Protestant beliefs you like, and think that thereby you are being 'both'--when in fact you are neither being fully firm in a Catholic faith nor in a Protestant one.

What should I do? (edit) I don't even consider myself Protestant. To be protestant, is to PROTEST something. I do not protest anything, but rather, am open to many different things

I agree with your sponsor that you should not be confirmed. Until you do humble yourself and actually go beyond what you have determined God should do to conform to your comfort zone and level of what you personally wish to 'accept', you aren't really ready to be Catholic. We'll pray for you.

And yes, hon, you are protesting. Don't be so 'open-minded' to everything that your brains risk falling out. You are protesting that you think your opinion is superior to that of the Church and so you don't want to accept the Church's teachings and you want to make them (to you) so 'little' that they don't count. But they do.

God bless.


#3

You should stay in the RCIA program and keep learning. In our RCIA class, we have a few people who have stayed for over two years (including ourselves). Our reason is that we are waiting for an marriage annulment. But in your case, you should stay also to learn more about Catholicism. It would be contrary to God's will if you stop short at this time and give up Catholicism simply because you don't understand certain things.

Keep going. Finally becoming Catholic and understanding your faith will be the single best thing you can ever do for yourself and for your family, your progeny. There is no doubt about it. Check out some stories about the Catholic Saints. See the lives that they lived. If you believe they are the kind of role models you should follow, then keep going and learn more about the church. The thing that is going to convince you has to come from real inspiration, real power to conversion, real fire of love for God. It is not going to come from strictly analysis in your mind, because our reasoning ability is compromised due to original sin.


#4

keep up with RCIA and raise these questions exactly as you have stated them here. Since Mary is not divine and the Church has not defined as doctrine whether or not she experienced physical death on earth, already you have two misconceptions about her to sort out. This is exactly why the first part of RCIA is called “Inquiry” because that is the time to ask, ask, ask, and keep asking. No the first, second or even third explanation may not clear up all your issues, but it will be a start, and at least clear away some mistaken ideas. This process opens your mind to the truth and is very necessary, so don’t rush it.

Also re-read your post carefully, and try to note the places where you say “I believe thus and so” or “I have always thought that” and then try to put those concerns in terms of what your current or former faith tradition actually teaches on these matters. When you do that you will be better able to look at the actual Catholic teaching, trace its source in Divine Revelation, and understand how and why it came to be defined as doctrine.

This process is also necessary because it helps you sort out what you accept that is common to all Christians, what you reject because you don’t know or cannot yet accept Catholic teaching, and what you are still puzzled about. This is a needed intellectual process, and a spiritual one, because part of conversion is to grow in humility as we realize we cannot define our own beliefs, we must be guided by God, and in the manner he has chosen to guide us.

Above all pray, and stay in RCIA so you have the support of others, and have a ready source to discuss and ask questions, and to hear good teaching above all deriving from the Word of God.

It is not necessary that everyone in the group celebrate sacraments at the same time, in fact, it would be odd if all were ready for each step and transition at the same time. It takes as long as it takes. Don’t move from one phase to the next until you are ready, and discern that with your sponsor and catechists.

Welcome home and God bless you.


#5

Stay!

*Start with the Eucharist, it is the source & summit of our Faith in Jesus & it is absolutely not symbolic, this false belief is a very recently developed fiction. *

Read John 6 in it's entirety numerous times, Jesus says: "I am the living bread which came down from heaven; if any one eats of this bread, he will live for ever; and the bread which I shall give for the life of the world is my flesh." (Jn 6:51). If the Eucharist is only symbolic, then Jesus didn't really die on the Cross for our sins!

Right after this the Jews & many disciples cannot believe His teaching & leave Jesus, **this is the only place in Scripture where any disciples leave! **If Jesus were merely speaking symbolically, He surely would have explained that & kept the disciples!!

"After this many of his disciples drew back and no longer went about with him. Jesus said to the twelve, "Do you also wish to go away?" Simon Peter answered him, "Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life; and we have believed, and have come to know, that you are the Holy One of God." (Jn 6:66-69)

Then read what the early Church Fathers believed, they all believe in the real presence & many died a martyrs death for that belief!

Even Martin Luther never doubted the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist.

*"Martin Luther himself confirms that the early Church unanimously taught the Real Presence: (Luther wrote) 'of all fathers, as many as you can name, not one has ever spoken about the sacrament as these fanatics do. None of them uses such an expression as 'it is simply bread and wine' or 'Christ's body and blood are not present.'...Certainly among so many fathers and so many writings a negative argument should have turned up at least once, as happens in other articles; but actually they all stand uniformly and consistently on the affirmative side" *Luther's Works (St Louis Mo: Concordia Publishing 1961), vol 37, 54.(Fr Frank Chacon & Jim Burnam, in their Beginning Apologetics 1, p. 9) **

Once you open your heart to the Eucharist, then the other teachings will be revealed to you when God sees fit !! Remember, no one fully understands God & no one ever will, Faith is the key!

Pray for God's Grace to open your heart to the Truth!!!

Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, Ora Pro Nobis Peccatoribus!

mark


#6

Yes, do stay. I kept trying to edit my post to fix some color stuff and also to fix the last sentence where I got a period; I mean you should not be confirmed UNTIL you can be humble and accept! I don’t think you should chuck it up or stop going.


#7

The problem is that you are arguing an error. Catholics do not believe Mary is divine. Perfection does not equal divinity; never did. Eve was created sinless too but chose to sin.

Though she may not be a god, Catholics do view her as an important instrument (not simply a virgin, randomly picked by God, to give birth to Jesus). Then there's the whole thing about Mary being crowned in heaven, being the Queen, etc. I've always believed Mary was just the lucky person involved in the situation. She was no better or worse than me, but had faith, and trusted God, when approached by an angel.

Elijah was taken up to heaven in a fiery chariot so he never died either. The point is, whether Mary experienced physical death or not does not make a difference in Catholic teaching. In fact, we do not make a pronouncement one way or the other.

So... what about the whole "Assumption of Mary" teaching? Does this not suggest that we believe she was simply taken up, and not through death?

...The literal teaching has been held since the time of the apostles. The bread and wine retain the appearance of bread and wine (the accidents) but there is a true, real transformation whereby it becomes the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity, of Christ. Remember, His Body is GLORIFIED now and capable of such miraculous effect.

So by a "true, real transformation" that cannot be detected by any of our senses, we just tell ourselves that it's something different? So, although I drive a car, I can just tell myself it's actually a truck, and can just believe it, and rebuke others when they tell me otherwise?

... And finally, does God operate on what you 'personally believe' or should you be adjusting your 'personal ' and fallible beliefs to what God actually says through His authority--the Church? Notice how often you're talking of YOU throughout your paragraph and how God is only mentioned in how you THINK He SHOULD be. .

We all have personal beliefs on different things. We all have personal relationships with God. What's wrong with that? If we all believed the same thing, there would be one relgiion, one church, one understanding, etc. If we all believed the same thing, we would all believe (e.g., there would be no non-believers). It is vital that we each believe things on our own, not because someone simply told us to, but because we want to, and honestly do. I have NEVER said that I think god SHOULD be this... I've simply shared my beliefs, my theories. You can believe anything if you try hard enough. All we can do is believe, have faith, in a particular idea, teaching, tradition, etc, and wait until the end when it all becomes clear...

...it's right in the Bible along with the fact that the prayers of the saints and the actual sightings of the bodies of many (in the white garments) who are spoken of as the saints are there, and they aren't sleeping, and they obviously 'hear' through God's grace the prayers of us the living.

So because there are supposed sightings, this somehow proves they've had the ability to use telepathy and or have some sort of direct channel with God to communicate with us? We're assuming things here, people.

You're making a false separation. It is not "the relationship OR the Church; it is the relationship AND the Church.'

In your opinion. That's your theory, your belief, as you've been taught, and accept. You don't accept it because it's right, you accept it, because that's what's currently in your mind. You're not open to other possibilities, which is fine. I want to get to the point where I don't ask so many questions, and I think an important step in doing so, is determining what truly IS most important about Christianity, and then letting God reveal the rest in His own timing.

...you want to take whatever parts you like of the Catholic faith, ignore the rest, continue with the Protestant beliefs you like, and think that thereby you are being 'both'--when in fact you are neither being fully firm in a Catholic faith nor in a Protestant one.

This is correct. Are you 100% Catholic? Do you know this for a fact? Do you side with EVERYTHING, every belief, everything that has been said, taught, etc? Do you have no ideas of your own? Do you have no theories on certain topics? Are you not open to anyhting else? If so, good for you! I, however, am not so lucky, that I can simply accept anything and everything without reason.

I agree with your sponsor that you should not be confirmed. Until you do humble yourself and actually go beyond what you have determined God should do to conform to your comfort zone and level of what you personally wish to 'accept', you aren't really ready to be Catholic. We'll pray for you.

I am quite humble. I have never asked God to conform with me. What you do, is conform with a human body (the Church) first, and with that, attempt to build a relationship. My priority is on having a relationship first, in doing so, incorporating myself with other believers.

... You are protesting that you think your opinion is superior to that of the Church and so you don't want to accept the Church's teachings and you want to make them (to you) so 'little' that they don't count. But they do.

I'm not protesting anything. I accept some of the Church's teachings, but others I'm not so sure on. The same goes for the government. Do you accept everything the government says and does, or do you take something here and there, and in your mind, build, what you believe, would be the perfect utopia?

God bless.

You too!


#8

In all due respect, finish RCIA but don’t go any further than that until you really accept the Church and all of her teachings. You have to empty your cup before you fill it with Truth, you can’t mix Truth and falsity.


#9

[quote="GeorgeSword, post:8, topic:180682"]
You have to empty your cup before you fill it with Truth, you can't mix Truth and falsity.

[/quote]

A good idea, in theory, when it comes to reality. Unfortunately, with spirituality, theology, and doctrines, what is truth, and what is "falsity", is debatable, has always been debatable, and always will be. We all must find our path to God, and I, like so many others, believe it's through Jesus Christ. I think that beyond that, however, it's sheer speculation, based on multiple interpreations of multiple instances of scriptures (and in this case, with Catholicism, oral sayings and traditions).

I don't see why I cannot be Confirmed. I am Christian. Is that not what's most important to God? If my Confirmation encourages me to be an even better Christian, then great! If it doesn't, then great! I cannot know, however, until I try.


#10

You don't sound ready or willing to be Catholic. I think you would make a very good Lutheran after reading your post.


#11

I am willing and desire to go through the process of becoming Catholic (e.g. RCIA, rites, Confirmation, Eucharist, etc), however, I do not believe that in doing so, I am saved, nor put under a different light than anyone else, Catholic or not. My becoming Catholic, would be my attempt to grow closer to God, plain and simple. There are things I would take as truth, and others I would question (and pray about), and believe that in time (though maybe not in this life), God would reveal it.

It all sounds fine and dandy to me, however, the general consensus is that I should not be confirmed. That sort of throws a wrench into things.

What about my beliefs makes me sound Lutheran? The fact that I don’t completely side with all the teachings of the Catholic Church? I’ve been to Lutheran services before, and they were quite nice.


#12

I think you should stay in RCIA to continue to learn about the Catholic faith, but I think that you should not be confirmed in the Church until you are able to truthfully say that you believe everything that is required of you to believe.

It is my understanding that during confirmation you are asked some form of the following questions:

Do you reject Satan and all his works and all his empty promises?

Do you believe in God the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth?

Do you believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was born of the Virgin Mary,
was crucified, died, and was buried, rose from the dead, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father?

Do you believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who came upon the apostles at Pentecost and today is given to you sacramentally in Confirmation?

Do you believe in the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting?

There maybe some other questions, we have only briefly touched on this in RCIA, we will go more in depth on the subject of baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist when we resume classes after the Christmas break.


#13

I believe in all of the above, however, I will say that as far as “the communion of saints”, my belief is that “saints”, as all people who die and go to heaven, wait there for us. I’m not sure I believe in intercession, that the dead can hear us, etc. I don’t believe there is a channel between heaven and Earth, other than the one opened by prayer, direct from a person, to God.

It sounds as though I would, essentially, meet the requirements for Confirmation, wouldn’t you say so?


#14

Like I said I am currently in RCIA myself so I am not expert, but I am pretty sure we where told that we had to 100% beileve in all church teachings before we could be confirmed and in the Catechism of the Catholic Church it states:

956 The intercession of the saints. "Being more closely united to Christ, those who dwell in heaven fix the whole Church more firmly in holiness… They do not cease to intercede with the Father for us, as they proffer the merits which they acquired on earth through the one mediator between God and men, Christ Jesus… So by their fraternal concern is our weakness greatly helped."493

Do not weep, for I shall be more useful to you after my death and I shall help you then more effectively than during my life.494
I want to spend my heaven in doing good on earth.495

957 Communion with the saints. "It is not merely by the title of example that we cherish the memory of those in heaven; we seek, rather, that by this devotion to the exercise of fraternal charity the union of the whole Church in the Spirit may be strengthened. Exactly as Christian communion among our fellow pilgrims brings us closer to Christ, so our communion with the saints joins us to Christ, from whom as from its fountain and head issues all grace, and the life of the People of God itself"496:


#15

You know, in our faith we don’t believe in coincidence but God’s providence for things happened in our lives. It is definitely more so for God’s ultimate plan of salvation; therefore, Mary was chosen from her conception in St. Ann’s womb. It is not that Mary was lucky. The whole salvation was planned by God’s wisdom.

It is vital that we each believe things on our own…

We are all entitled to have our own beliefs. However, truth is absolute; if truth is not absolute, it is not truth. That is why so many people are seeking for truth and get on the journey of conversion.

I’m not protesting anything. I accept some of the Church’s teachings, but others I’m not so sure on. The same goes for the government.

Obedience is part of our faith. As a Catholic, we follow the Church’s teachings. We don’t pick and choose things to fit our own taste. This is different from a government in democracy.


#16

It’s very important to remember that when a person recieves the sacraments, especially the Holy Eucharist and Confirmation, part of what they are doing when they partake of these is that they are saying publicly that they agree with, believe, and are in full communion and fellowship with the Catholic Church and all of Her teachings on Faith and Morals.

If a person recieves the sacrament of Confirmation or the Holy Eucharist and rejects Catholic teaching on faith (doctrine) and morals that person is being dishonest in a very public manner and undermining their own integrity. Not to mention spiritual harm that is done to oneself and others as well.

Honesty and respect dictate that a person should not attempt to fool or mislead anyone or themselves by recieving these sacraments in an unworthy or dishonest manner.

You should definitely continue to question and seek, but Confirmation and any other of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church are for those who have determined that Catholicism is the one true Christian faith, accepting all Catholic teachings.

There is nothing wrong with seeking, studying, and questioning until such a time that you feel ready to accept all of the Church’s teachings, and then enter the Church at that time.


#17

I'm willing to predict that if you spend a year doing Holy Hours at an adoration chapel at least twice a week your questions would just melt away and you'll forgot why you even asked them. :D

Are you willing to try it?


#18

[quote="tinalewis, post:17, topic:180682"]
I'm willing to predict that if you spend a year doing Holy Hours at an adoration chapel at least twice a week your questions would just melt away and you'll forgot why you even asked them. :D

Are you willing to try it?

[/quote]

Eucharistic Adoration is a great suggestion. No one regularly stays in front of Jesus won't be transformed. If one sincerely opens his heart to the Lord and listen, he is bound to receive answers he is seeking for.


#19

[quote="InLight247, post:18, topic:180682"]
Eucharistic Adoration is a great suggestion. No one regularly stays in front of Jesus won't be transformed. If one sincerely opens his heart to the Lord and listen, he is bound to receive answers he is seeking for.

[/quote]

So basically, I kneel before the altar, and repeatedly tell myself "this is not a cracker, this is not a cracker, this is not a cracker" until I really think it's not, and then start to associate certain feelings, emotions, and ideas, to said cracker?


#20

[quote="jasphair, post:19, topic:180682"]
So basically, I kneel before the altar, and repeatedly tell myself "this is not a cracker, this is not a cracker, this is not a cracker" until I really think it's not, and then start to associate certain feelings, emotions, and ideas, to said cracker?

[/quote]

I remember when I first read about the doctrines that the Church teaches about the Eucharist. My first reaction was, "this is crazy, these people are out of their minds". I felt that way until I did two things.
First of which was go to Mass with a friend of mine and sit on the front row (getting to see the consecration up close and personal was incredible), and second was spend an hour before the Blessed Sacrament in the Monstrance at another church that offers 24/7 Eucharistic adoration. These two things completely changed my mind about the Real Presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. I have never been the same since.

Go and be with Him, just give it a try. What harm could it do? You are in my prayers.
I would also recommend this website: therealpresence.org/


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