Should I get confirmed?


#1

Hello all,

 I am a revert to the Catholic church and have been for the past 6 years. I'm 33 now and  I never made my confirmation when I was younger.

I often at times consider getting confirmed, but I really don’t want to sit through church classes that will interfere with my real classes from school. Plus I’ve seen other people get introduced into the church where everything is a big deal and done in front of the congregation. I don’t like a bunch of attention and show boating.
I don’t really believe in all that much of a personal God, because of life’s experiences; so why should I bother getting confirmed?


#2

Wait, you're a revert but you don't believe in the Church's teachings? :confused:

This is a sacrament, it's not just a symbolic ceremony.

"A bunch of attention and show boating"

Well, most parishes like to welcome their new members or confirmands and it is a sacrament, so it will be done within a Mass.

As you have put it...No, I would have to say, I don't see any reason for you to be confirmed. That alone is not going to get you into heaven, since you seem to be hedging your bets, Pascal.


#3

It is really only up to you to decide. God shows you the way, up to you to follow it or not. Confirmation is a sacrament and it is a must, if you truly believe. If you don't believe then it wouldn't be valid. God gave you free will.


#4

Your faith is the ONLY thing that counts, in this life and the next. You don't want church classes to interfere with your "real" classes ??? You need to figure out your priorities.

I started my reversion, slowly, about 6 years ago and am only getting confirmed this year. You should wait until you're ready. I don't like the pomp and circumstance either. I will suffer through it to "be sealed with the Holy Spirit."


#5

All Catholics are obligated to be confirmed, so yes you absolutely need to step forward and complete the sacraments of initiation.

If you do not understand Confirmation and why it is important, all the more reason for you to go to those classes you think unnecessary.


#6

I admit, I did actually wonder this myself. I have already been baptized, and had first communion at the age of 10. I left the church before confirmation. Does it make me less of a Catholic because I am not confirmed yet?

I probably will go through RCIA eventually, illness has kept me from starting yet, but i have wondered often too, if it was a true necessity, since i have the baptism and communion parts done already.


Dating a Catholic who doesn't go to church
#7

[quote="Angelsflight, post:6, topic:301756"]
I admit, I did actually wonder this myself. I have already been baptized, and had first communion at the age of 10. I left the church before confirmation. Does it make me less of a Catholic because I am not confirmed yet?

I probably will go through RCIA eventually, illness has kept me from starting yet, but i have wondered often too, if it was a true necessity, since i have the baptism and communion parts done already.

[/quote]

Actually, confirmation is like Part 2 of Baptism and should not be separated by such a long time. I learned on this forum it only became common practice to stretch out the time span between when there weren't enough Bishops to confirm more often. I can't remember but I think someone said that some parishes now do them at the same time.

Unfortunately Catholics tend to think that once they get confirmed, they "graduate" and that's it. But that's not what is supposed to happen.

I think my classes may have gone on for 6 or 8 weeks. It's worth it. Doesn't make you less of a Catholic but if you want to do anything else in the Church, you need to complete your sacraments. Won't be allowed to marry in the Church without doing it.


#8

[quote="Jessup, post:1, topic:301756"]
I've seen other people get introduced into the church where everything is a big deal and done in front of the congregation. I don't like a bunch of attention and show boating.
I don't really believe in all that much of a personal God, because of life's experiences; so why should I bother getting confirmed?

[/quote]

"A bunch of attention and show boating"

Well, most parishes like to welcome their new members or confirmands and it is a sacrament, so it will be done within a Mass.

When one of Christ's lost sheep are found and returned, all the angels in Heaven celebrate - the pomp and circumstance is a celebration by the congregation with the angels. Accept it at face value and thank God for your salvation. If it embarrasses you, don't worry - you'll survive that. ;) If that's the hardest thing you ever have to face in your life, you're very blessed.


#9

[quote="Jessup, post:1, topic:301756"]
Hello all,

 I am a revert to the Catholic church and have been for the past 6 years. I'm 33 now and  I never made my confirmation when I was younger.

I often at times consider getting confirmed, but I really don't want to sit through church classes that will interfere with my real classes from school. Plus I've seen other people get introduced into the church where everything is a big deal and done in front of the congregation. I don't like a bunch of attention and show boating.
I don't really believe in all that much of a personal God, because of life's experiences; so why should I bother getting confirmed?

[/quote]

The sacrament of Confirmation is like the day of pentecost recounted in the Acts of the Apostles when the Holy Spirit descended on the apostles. The Holy Spirit gave the apostles the courage to proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ and the Kingdom of God to all the nations. The sacrament of confirmation gives us the moral courage to live as well as proclaim the christian life in the world where we are beset by so many obstacles. I would advise you to pick up and read The Catechism of the Catholic Church especially the chapter on the sacraments and the sacrament of confirmation.


#10

As others have said, Confirmation is a sacrament. This is why it is important to be confirmed, however, you have to do it if you WANT to do it. No one can force you to.

As far as classes are concerned, there were allowances made for a couple of people in my RCIA class so that they were able to have workbooks rather than coming to class twice a week (even though the classes were only an hour long -- anyone can sit through that!).

I was not baptized and therefore, for the Rite of Election, me and one other gal from my RCIA class did have to stand in front of the congregation with our sponsors and it was a bit nerve-wracking for me because I have a social phobia, but afterward everyone was so wonderful! It isn't about "let's see how much attention we can give this person so we can embarrass them", it's about becoming part of that faith family, of standing before everyone and letting them know that this is what you're doing, that you believe in the Church's teachings and want to become fully into communion with the Church. :)

Having said all of this, I do have a question though: Why are you bothering to ask about getting confirmed if 1) you don't want to sit through classes; 2) you don't want to get up for any reason in front of a bunch of people, and 3) you don't even believe in a personal God?? I am praying for you.


#11

It makes you a Catholic who has not completed the sacraments of initiation and who has not yet received the fullness of the gifts of the holy spirit.

RCIA is for non-Catholics. I encourage you to ask about adult confirmation classes, which are typically a few weeks before confirmation.


#12

Absolutley!!

The Graces and Gifts you actually recieve at Confirmation are very nessescary for the health of your soul!!


#13

[quote="Delaine75, post:10, topic:301756"]
As others have said, Confirmation is a sacrament. This is why it is important to be confirmed, however, you have to do it if you WANT to do it. No one can force you to.

As far as classes are concerned, there were allowances made for a couple of people in my RCIA class so that they were able to have workbooks rather than coming to class twice a week (even though the classes were only an hour long -- anyone can sit through that!).

I was not baptized and therefore, for the Rite of Election, me and one other gal from my RCIA class did have to stand in front of the congregation with our sponsors and it was a bit nerve-wracking for me because I have a social phobia, but afterward everyone was so wonderful! It isn't about "let's see how much attention we can give this person so we can embarrass them", it's about becoming part of that faith family, of standing before everyone and letting them know that this is what you're doing, that you believe in the Church's teachings and want to become fully into communion with the Church. :)

Having said all of this, I do have a question though: Why are you bothering to ask about getting confirmed if 1) you don't want to sit through classes; 2) you don't want to get up for any reason in front of a bunch of people, and 3) you don't even believe in a personal God?? I am praying for you.

[/quote]

Hey Delaine
   I feel classes are a waste of time and it isn't anything I can't teach myself going through any books and reading on my own. 2) I feel some of the ritual at the other parishes I've been to are kind of silly and over dramatic for a welcoming. 

3) Its not so much that I don't believe in the personal God as much as what it is that I don't really think that God is in my life. I would like him in my life, but I don't feel that presence I had been thinking maybe confirmation would put him there.


#14

[quote="Richca, post:9, topic:301756"]
The sacrament of Confirmation is like the day of pentecost recounted in the Acts of the Apostles when the Holy Spirit descended on the apostles. The Holy Spirit gave the apostles the courage to proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ and the Kingdom of God to all the nations. The sacrament of confirmation gives us the moral courage to live as well as proclaim the christian life in the world where we are beset by so many obstacles. I would advise you to pick up and read The Catechism of the Catholic Church especially the chapter on the sacraments and the sacrament of confirmation.

[/quote]

 I'll do that thank you. I figured the only reason I would ever need it is to get married. But that doesn't seem to be going anywhere. I had also figured I'll wait and just see if I get a woman in my life I'll just switch over to what ever denomination she is. I thought that would be a good decision point 

Cheers! :thumbsup:


#15

[quote="1ke, post:11, topic:301756"]
It makes you a Catholic who has not completed the sacraments of initiation and who has not yet received the fullness of the gifts of the holy spirit.

RCIA is for non-Catholics. I encourage you to ask about adult confirmation classes, which are typically a few weeks before confirmation.

[/quote]

Cool! I did not know about this...I will ask my priest about it


#16

Yes, by all means do get confirmed and become a solder of Christ, God is waiting for you to make that move, and don,t worry about all the people their,for their are others also along you that are getting cofirmed.If you Love Jesus,than show the Lord you Love him. Good like my freind, and God Bless.


#17

I would say, why not? But better still, why not talk to a good priest about it?


#18

Confirmation is a Sacrament of Initiation and every Catholic should be Confirmed. However, it is not an absolute requirement for getting married, that is an error. I know because I am married to a Catholic who was never confirmed. And I know others married in the Church who were not confirmed. There is a Canon Law covering this that says people should be confirmed before marriage unless there is a grave inconvenience. (I don't know the number, but I looked it up once).

This is not to discourage anyone from getting confirmed before marriage, just a point that needs clarified. In our case, my husband was baptized into the Church, but the priest at that time did not have the faculties from the Bishop to administer the Sacrament of Confirmation. I imagine that most of these cases are where there is no priest with the faculties to confirm and people would have to wait an unusually long time to get married, waiting for a Bishop, or there is a necessity for a marriage to take place in a very short amount of time. Today that probably does not happen much, but it may in certain parts of the world.


#19

Yeah, I know that most people need to get through RCIA for the baptism and to get the Eucharist, I figured since I already had those 2 done, and I know i will never marry in the church, I just wasn't sure if I absolutely needed it, or if I was not a full Catholic yet because I did not have it.

Still checking with my priest on the adult confirmation classes. He is hard to reach sometimes. :)

So these classes for confirmation only, do they differ a lot from what is taught in RCIA? Or just a shorter version of it?


#20

Regarding unworthy reception of communion (such as not really believing in a personal God....):

Beloved in the Lord: Our Savior Christ, on the night before
he suffered, instituted the Sacrament of his Body and
Blood as a sign and pledge of his love, for the continual
remembrance of the sacrifice of his death, and for a spiritual
sharing in his risen life. For in these holy Mysteries we are
made one with Christ, and Christ with us; we are made one
body in him, and members one of another.

Having in mind, therefore, his great love for us, and in
obedience to his command, his Church renders to Almighty
God our heavenly Father never-ending thanks for the
creation of the world, for his continual providence over us,
for his love for all mankind, and for the redemption of the
world by our Savior Christ, who took upon himself our flesh,
and humbled himself even to death on the cross, that he
might make us the children of God by the power of the Holy
Spirit, and exalt us to everlasting life.

But if we are to share rightly in the celebration of those holy
Mysteries, and be nourished by that spiritual Food, we must
remember the dignity of that holy Sacrament. I therefore call
upon you to consider how Saint Paul exhorts all persons to
prepare themselves carefully before eating of that Bread and
drinking of that Cup.

For, as the benefit is great, if with penitent hearts and living
faith we receive the holy Sacrament, so is the danger great, if
we receive it improperly, not recognizing the Lord’s Body.
Judge yourselves, therefore, lest you be judged by the Lord.

Examine your lives and conduct by the rule of God’s
commandments, that you may perceive wherein you have
offended in what you have done or left undone, whether in
thought, word, or deed. And acknowledge your sins before
Almighty God, with full purpose of amendment of life, being
ready to make restitution for all injuries and wrongs done by
you to others; and also being ready to forgive those who have
offended you, in order that you yourselves may be forgiven.
And then, being reconciled with one another, come to the
banquet of that most heavenly Food.

And if, in your preparation, you need help and counsel, then
go and open your grief to a discreet and understanding priest,
and confess your sins, that you may receive the benefit of
absolution, and spiritual counsel and advice; to the removal
of scruple and doubt, the assurance of pardon, and the
strengthening of your faith.

To Christ our Lord who loves us, and washed us in his own
blood, and made us a kingdom of priests to serve his God
and Father, to him be glory in the Church evermore. Through
him let us offer continually the sacrifice of praise, which is
our bounden duty and service, and, with faith in him, come
boldly before the throne of grace [and humbly confess our
sins to Almighty God].

Good luck in your journey.


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