Should I report him for animal abuse?


#1

My boyfriend's neighbour is really annoying me because of how he treats his dog. I'll call him Bob (not real name).

Bob works in security. He has a huge electric fence and gate around his house. He brought a german shepard puppy (a police dog) and what did he do? Leave it all day and night in a dog run with only an old table for shelter.

The dog run has cement flooring. It's about 15ft long and about 4-5ft wide. The dog is left there all day and all night, and only has 1-2 walks/opportunity to go out a day. I know this because I lived at my boyfriend's house for about 5 weeks recently, and his bedroom has a view of Bob's entire garden.

I want to report him to the RSPCA (royal society for the prevention of cruelty to animals). I don't think they will take the dog away from him, but that run is now far too small for that dog who is now fully grown. The dog barks all the time, and whines too.

I'm in a good position to report them because I live there for a week or so at a time, but not permenantly. My boyfriend's family won't know so therefore they won't know anything about it if Bob does get visited by the RSPCA and he tries to blame someone.


#2

I would. Without hesitation.

~Liza


#3

I just called just now and the woman said that although the run is small, it's not necessarily an issue.

I said that the dog gets walked at least once a day, possibily twice, and that the dog appears to be in good physical health although the dog whines and barks most of the day. I said that there was a shed in the garden with the dog, but I couldn't tell whether or not the dog had access to it because of where my boyfriend's bedroom window is.

She said if I find that the dog cannot get into the shed, to call them again because then they can take action. Apart from that, she said he hasn't broken the law.


#4

It is sad - there is a fine line I suppose between breaking the law, abuse, and just down right neglect. The animal is being used as a slave, as a guard dog (but even true police/military guard dogs are treated better), and not as a pet. I suppose that is legal, but not entirely ethical or moral.

Glad you made the call, at least he is on record now as having received a complaint.

~Liza


#5

It is sad but true that he hasn’t broken the law.

My boyfriend’s family have said that they’re going to call when it gets to winter, because then the dog is left out in the cold.

The woman on the phone gave me a number to call which will allow me to complain about the situation but as a noise/environmental issue rather than neglect, even though the dog is barking because it’s bored, no doubt. Going to do that on Monday because they’re only open on weekdays as its our local authority. Hopefully then he’ll get a letter/phonecall and will have to ensure the dog barks less, therefore is happier.

It’s cruel, because when the dog barks he’s facing the backdoor of the house. To me, caging an animal is slavery.


#6

No, talk to your neighbor first. Give him 3 days max, if nothing changes, call the cops.


#7

.QUOTE=LemonAndLime;7146841]It is sad but true that he hasn’t broken the law.

My boyfriend’s family have said that they’re going to call when it gets to winter, because then the dog is left out in the cold.

The woman on the phone gave me a number to call which will allow me to complain about the situation but as a noise/environmental issue rather than neglect, even though the dog is barking because it’s bored, no doubt. Going to do that on Monday because they’re only open on weekdays as its our local authority. Hopefully then he’ll get a letter/phonecall and will have to ensure the dog barks less, therefore is happier.

It’s cruel, because when the dog barks he’s facing the backdoor of the house. To me, caging an animal is slavery.

Referring to “caging an animal is slavery”. People cage animals in their homes when they go to work, or when they bother visitors to the home. Who said that the devil is like a chained dog … He won’t hurt you unless you go near them … Sometimes they get loose. It is interesting that there are really friendly, calm, sweet dogs and, really mean ones. It is not the size, but the way they are taken care of. My one neighbor feeds cats and allows them into her home, but they are not trained and poop everywhere, and cannot be petted. He’s raising his dog the way he wishes to, but, I would ask him about it rather than just calling the humane department, who, in the US, might send a letter, but otherwise is worthless.


#8

Personally, I WOULDN'T talk to your neighbor first. Why? Basic animal care should be a given. And if you can't respect and animal, I doubt you respect humans either. I actually avoid people that have anger or show abuse towards animals. There is something wrong with them... it's a HUGE red flag.

He doesn't need to KNOW which neighbor called the authorities on him. He could start harassing you causing a whole new problem.

Call the police about noise disturbance.


#9

With all due respect, I do not think you should get involved. First of all, as you say you do not live there. When people invite you as a guest in their home, there is an expectation to be a gracious guest. To start calling the authorities on their neighbours is in a way telling them they do not know who to run their own home.

If they do not see reason to complain, you need to respect their wishes.

As well, the dog is not being directly abuse. Of course, it is not receiving the best possible care, but it is a dog not a child. If will not grow up to be a meance to society.

Personlly, I think we need to choose our battles and this is not one I would get involved.

Of course that is simply my opinion. I respect any decision you make

CM


#10

But the thing is, my boyfriend's family do complain about it. The reason they did not phone RSPCA yet was because the dog was in good health and they cannot complain about the barking when they've been noisy because some building work has been going on at their house.

My boyfriend himself said he's going to complain when it becomes winter. While the dog run was being built, his mother was remarking on how cruel the neighbour was to want to keep a dog there.

I think the only reason they have not complained yet was because the neighbour might get revenge and complain about the building work. Also, the British attitude of it not being "our business" and not wanting to cause a fuss is probably part of it.


#11

[quote="LemonAndLime, post:10, topic:215506"]
But the thing is, my boyfriend's family do complain about it. The reason they did not phone RSPCA yet was because the dog was in good health and they cannot complain about the barking when they've been noisy because some building work has been going on at their house.

My boyfriend himself said he's going to complain when it becomes winter. While the dog run was being built, his mother was remarking on how cruel the neighbour was to want to keep a dog there.

I think the only reason they have not complained yet was because the neighbour might get revenge and complain about the building work. Also, the British attitude of it not being "our business" and not wanting to cause a fuss is probably part of it.

[/quote]

If the neighbor has a "huge electric gate and fence around his house", he need not put the dog in a run. If he is in the business of "security", he of all people should know that a penned dog, barking or not, does not provide security or protection, as it cannot access any perpetrator.

A puppy/young dog needs socialization. It needs to be around other dogs. It needs to be free to run and play. He is destroying the spirit of this dog. There are services in the U.S., and probably in the U.K., where individuals visit the homes of dog and cat owners while the owners are at work, and they play with the pets, make sure they have water and shelter, make sure they are not injured or suffering in any way, give them medications when prescribed, etc. Why not investigate these services as they might exist in your area and talk with your boyfriend's neighbor about it? No matter what is said, his ego will be bruised and he will come off like a jerk, but press on. Animal advocacy requires many things of us, including tenacity and patience. Maybe he would allow you or your boyfriend to visit the dog every couple of days. The poor thing is living a black and white life in a world of limitless, saturated, glorious color. He needs someone to stand up for him.

Copy this and put it in the owner's mailbox if you can't bring yourself to speak with him face to face. It is not a criticism, really; it is an enlightenment. I'll take the heat for it. Neglect is as devastating as abuse.

tammy57


#12

[quote="LemonAndLime, post:10, topic:215506"]
But the thing is, my boyfriend's family do complain about it. The reason they did not phone RSPCA yet was because the dog was in good health and they cannot complain about the barking when they've been noisy because some building work has been going on at their house.

My boyfriend himself said he's going to complain when it becomes winter. While the dog run was being built, his mother was remarking on how cruel the neighbour was to want to keep a dog there.

I think the only reason they have not complained yet was because the neighbour might get revenge and complain about the building work. Also, the British attitude of it not being "our business" and not wanting to cause a fuss is probably part of it.

[/quote]

Regardless, initiating the call is like taking over without letting the home owners have a chance to make up their mind. Why not say 'If you are too shy I would be happy to make the call for you' If they say 'not yet' respect their wishes


#13

[quote="LemonAndLime, post:10, topic:215506"]
But the thing is, my boyfriend's family do complain about it. The reason they did not phone RSPCA yet was because the dog was in good health and they cannot complain about the barking when they've been noisy because some building work has been going on at their house.

My boyfriend himself said he's going to complain when it becomes winter. While the dog run was being built, his mother was remarking on how cruel the neighbour was to want to keep a dog there.

I think the only reason they have not complained yet was because the neighbour might get revenge and complain about the building work. Also, the British attitude of it not being "our business" and not wanting to cause a fuss is probably part of it.

[/quote]

I would think that the RSPCA would much rather make a call to the owner when it is advisory, to let the owner know what he needs to do to avoid breaking the law in the future, than to have to come when the animal has already being abused. After all, your boyfriends parents can invite them into their house or backyard for the RSPCA to observe the dog. The RSPCA doesn't have to wait to get a warrant.

Even if they are not going to come out and talk to the owner about sub-standard conditions for the dog, they will let you know very specifically what the minimum is under which you can act. They can let you know what kind of documentation needs to be done so that the dog is subjected to the minimum amount of suffering before effective intervention can be mounted.

As for the building work, you might ask your boyfriend which he and his family will regret more when they look back on this situation: intervening and failing to complete the work on their house because of their neighbor's retaliation or failing to protect an animal that cannot protect itself and cannot retaliate against anyone. (Or at least, not yet. An abused dog can easily become a dangerous dog.)


#14

I have known people who treat their dogs as if they were children. Others treat dogs like livestock. I personally feel that proper treatment of pets is in between these extremes. Depending upon the climate where you live, keeping a shepherd outdoors may be completely humane. People view proper treatment of pets differently.


#15

Before you guys start throwing stones, evaulate what it is y'all are condemning. This dog is not like a regular house pet that is free to roam as it wishes, it is a soon to be prfessionaly trained police dog. I have association with a Labrador retriever trainer who himself is affiliated with other trainers and has been doing it for 10 years. If you think that this animal is being abused because of it's living conditions please don't watch the training as certain stimuli are used to condition a response. Some of it is painful but is neccessary for the dicipline of the dog and it's progression.


#16

It's not going to be a professionall trained dog. The guy sells security fencing and gates. Wish the poor thing was in the hands of a professional dog handler though.


#17

Sorry, I assumed the breed of dog and the neighbor’s profession as it resulting in the work force.


#18

No no it’s alright, I assumed it also for a while.


#19

While I absolutely commend you for having such a compassionate heart to worry so about this dog I have to ask if you know exactly what constitutes neglect or animal abuse in your state as it varies greatly. Some people view beatings as an abuse but not adaquate food and living conditions and clean water as an abuse. People see things differently and that is why it is important to know the laws in your area.

I will ask that you do not approach the owner and make all calls to the Animal Control for their handling because they are knowledgable concerning animal neglect/abuse laws for your state and they will know for certain if this dog, (according to law), is in fact living in a neglectful/abusive home. Eventhough he is not living in the house sleeping on the sofa the owner still sees to it that he is taken for walks twice/day. He may well be within the law.

Having said all this, I still want to thank you for not turning your head and pretending that you don't see what may possibly be neglect/abuse of an animal. This unfortunately happens in all too many cases leaving the animal to die a painful, slow, and very lonely death.


#20

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