Should one partake in communion?


#1

I believe I know the answer but I want to know for sure. Recently, my wife and I were divorced in civil court. I do not plan on seeking to nullify the marriage. I believe it is valid. I plan on keeping my vows I made to God and her. She is seeing another man, actually has before we separated. I care for her and my main concern is for her to go to heaven. I have advised her (but won't push it any further) she shouldn't take communion while our marriage is considered valid because of seeing the other man. I believe in Gods eyes we are still married. The problem I have with communion, to paraphrase is according to scripture if you are living in sin by partaking in communion you are doing harm to your soul. I don't want her to harm herself but she doesn't think I'm right and I don't think she cares. Am I wrong for feeling the way I do?


#2

[quote="cacaco, post:1, topic:219574"]
I believe I know the answer but I want to know for sure. Recently, my wife and I were divorced in civil court. I do not plan on seeking to nullify the marriage. I believe it is valid. I plan on keeping my vows I made to God and her. She is seeing another man, actually has before we separated. I care for her and my main concern is for her to go to heaven. I have advised her (but won't push it any further) she shouldn't take communion while our marriage is considered valid because of seeing the other man. I believe in Gods eyes we are still married. The problem I have with communion, to paraphrase is according to scripture if you are living in sin by partaking in communion you are doing harm to your soul. I don't want her to harm herself but she doesn't think I'm right and I don't think she cares. Am I wrong for feeling the way I do?

[/quote]

Friend,

Your position is correct.:o

Catholic Catechism:
1472 To understand this doctrine and practice of the Church, it is necessary to understand that sin has a double consequence. Grave sin deprives us of communion with God and therefore makes us incapable of eternal life, the privation of which is called the "eternal punishment" of sin. On the other hand every sin, even venial, entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures, which must be purified either here on earth, or after death in the state called Purgatory. This purification frees one from what is called the "temporal punishment" of sin. These two punishments must not be conceived of as a kind of vengeance inflicted by God from without, but as following from the very nature of sin. A conversion which proceeds from a fervent charity can attain the complete purification of the sinner in such a way that no punishment would remain.

1457 According to the Church's command, "after having attained the age of discretion, each of the faithful is bound by an obligation faithfully to confess serious sins at least once a year." Anyone who is aware of having committed a mortal sin must not receive Holy Communion, even if he experiences deep contrition, without having first received sacramental absolution, unless he has a grave reason for receiving Communion and there is no possibility of going to confession. Children must go to the sacrament of Penance before receiving Holy Communion for the first time.

This position has a Biblical Foundation:

1Cor.11 Verses 23 to 29 "For I [PAUL] received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me." In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me." For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until he comes.*** Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord.
Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself.[HERSELF!] ***

May God continue to Bless BOTH of you!


#3

If it makes you feel any better, if she truly does not believe herself to be in mortal sin, she isn’t. Full knowledge of the gravity of the sin must be there for it to be mortal.


#4

[quote="sharmin, post:3, topic:219574"]
If it makes you feel any better, if she truly does not believe herself to be in mortal sin, she isn't. Full knowledge of the gravity of the sin must be there for it to be mortal.

[/quote]

That's not entirely true. She doesn't have to believe it's a sin. She just has to have knowledge that the Church teaches that it is a sin.


#5

But I would think that she would have to believe the church is true to have true knowledge of the sin. If she doesn’t believe in the church, she wouldn’t believe it to be an authority, thus in her honest conscience, she isn’t knowingly commiting a grave sin against God. If she doesn’t believe she is commiting a mortal sin, I don’t think she is. Doesn’t a person have to delliberately sin with the intention of it being mortal for it to be mortal?


#6

[quote="sharmin, post:5, topic:219574"]
But I would think that she would have to believe the church is true to have true knowledge of the sin. If she doesn't believe in the church, she wouldn't believe it to be an authority, thus in her honest conscience, she isn't knowingly commiting a grave sin against God. If she doesn't believe she is commiting a mortal sin, I don't think she is.

[/quote]

There's nothing in the OP to indicate that she doesn't believe in the authority of the Church. Conscience is only a defense if it is properly formed or if the person is invincibly ignorant.

As the nuns used to say -- if it's wrong, if you know it's wrong and if you do it anyway = sin.

Doesn't a person have to delliberately sin with the intention of it being mortal for it to be mortal?

No. The person has to act deliberately, true. But the person doesn't have to deliberately intend the act to be mortally sinful. She just has to know it's wrong or be vincibly ignorant. (and act with free will, of course)


#7

[QUOT]E=sharmin;7266464]If it makes you feel any better, if she truly does not believe herself to be in mortal sin, she isn't. Full knowledge of the gravity of the sin must be there for it to be mortal.

TRUE, BUT....

If God has provided the means and opportunity fo he truth, and it was ignored or denined, well then it's a different situation.:rolleyes:


#8

OP, feelings aren't wrong, but once recognized they do need to be kept on leashes. As PJM and Corki have noted, you do have the theory correct. Of course you are concerned about your wife! Still, there gets to be a point where it isn't our business to read the consciences of others. We can tell right from wrong, but we need to stay clear of obsessing over those who aren't in our jurisdiction and have not asked for our advice.

Once the work of admonishment has been done--which does not condemn, but only reminds a person in a scandalous situation what the Church teaches--you, the abandoned husband, will have to leave the rest up to your wife and God. You were right to admonish her. It would not be right to pretend she is not behaving in a scandalous manner. Now that you have done this, though, pray for her and entrust her to God. Otherwise, you will not have peace of heart.

*God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.

Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
Taking, as He did, this sinful world
as it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right
if I surrender to His Will;
That I may be reasonably happy in this life
and supremely happy with Him
Forever in the next.
Amen. *

--Reinhold Niebuhr


#9

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