Should Recreational Marijuana Be Legalized?


#1
  • Yes.
  • No.
  • I don’t know.

0 voters

What is your position?


Recreatioinal Marijuanna
#2

It’s legal here in California. I don’t see a problem with it.


#3

Don’t Huff, Don’t Puff, stay away from that stuff!


#4

Yes, it bad. But is this the governments prerogative? Where does it stop? Should they criminalize all things that are bad for your health? Alcohol? Tobacco? Sugar?


#5

I don’t like the way Grass Crusaders are advocating it as a panacea for governmental budget problems, particularly as it is widely spread.

If the government levies a huge tax on this product, it will just invigorate the Black Market and demand for grass without tax stamps. It will cost just as much in law enforcement to stop untaxed marijuana as it costs to stop illegal pot.


#6

You forgot Caffeine


#7

No sugar nor caffeine!!! You guys are depressing me…suggest illegalising chocolate too and I may have a really really serious crisis. :rofl:


#8

I don’t know- my doctor said that Marijuana can be helpful for my seizures (my disability causes tons of seizures), but it is not legal in my country.


#9

For medical purposes, were it tested, refined and regulated by the FDA like other organic based medicines such as morphine, fine. But what lunatic thinks that medically prescribed weed sourced from Joe Stoner and his bong shop, is a good idea? Nuts!


#10

That is why I said, “I don’t know, I don’t want to try risky things and it’s not legal anyway.” I have other meds that help my seizures. Marijuana is not the “only way” to help my disease. And research says recreational Marijuana can kill patients like myself because we have weakened bodily systems. I have weakened immune system and I have muscle weakness as well as organ issues. It’s a dangerous option for me but if there is a way to test this material (as I don’t know much about Marijuana) maybe we’ll use it as medicine in the future. I don’t know.
Pax Christi! :slight_smile:


#11

It’s now legal in Massachusetts.
One store made two million dollars in one week, upon opening.
Cops having to direct traffic.


#12

I think it’s the latest substitute for God.


#13

No, definitely not. It harms the body and mind.


#14

I’m from Colorado, the first state to legalize recreational use (I think). I’m of a mixed mind about it and I did vote in favor of legalization. Here are my thoughts…
Criminalizing it caused thousands of young adults to have a criminal record for experimenting in their youth.
Being legal allows regulation and removes some of the criminal elements from controlling it.
There seems to be some medical benefits and with it legal, research can find out why it seems to help in some medical situations. This research would not take place as long as it remained illegal.
While it can be a gateway drug for harder substances, so is alcohol. With regulation this maybe minimized.
The tax revenue can be used to research and treat all drug abuse issues.
We don’t have a way to determine how stoned someone is currently. We can test for use within the last month but, unlike alcohol, we can’t determine the level of intoxication at a specific point in time. This, to me, is one of the biggest drawbacks to legalization. Further development of testing may change this problem in the future but we aren’t there yet.
Enforcement of the law seems to be unevenly distributed between blacks and whites.

In Colorado a large portion of the tax revenue is dedicated to substance abuse resolutions. So many are using it and getting it out of the hands of criminal organizations was important to me.
We’ve been legal for awhile now and society hasn’t deteriorated any more or less than prelegalization. Removing the criminality means lives aren’t ruined for being stupid in your youth and places personal responsibility on each individual yet allows them to make mistakes, learn lessons and still be employable in the future.

There are many pros and cons and deep thought when making a decision to use or legalize pot. I’m a child of the 60’s and saw so many lives ruined due to it being illegal and almost all the users I knew from the 60’s that avoided arrest are no longer using and are productive members of society. Those that had to serve jail time for it had to carry that stigma for life and have had to battle back from that experience. Jail ruined many of them.


#15

I’ve read all this before. Why should anyone use any illegal drug? Just to get high? I lived through the 1960s. I was there when the Hippies and anarchists wanted what they wanted to the point where some were saying “Off the Pigs!” Kill the police! Not rational.

Organized crime is well aware of the tax revenue issue. Whatever it is, they will tell their boys on the street to sell it for less, and they will invest in the marijuana business.

The Insurance Industry is keeping a close eye on this.


#16

Is organized crime still in the bootleg alcohol business? (I honestly don’t know the answer to this). Looking back on prohibition it seems that it no longer was profitable to continue in that business and I’m sure it didn’t happen overnight.

I agree with issue of driving while intoxicated on pot. So is drunk driving. One trend that I have noticed is that the youth of today don’t drive near as much as we did. This may eventually become a nonissue?


#17

If they criminilaze caffeine nothing will get done at my house in the morning I depend on my morning coffee at 5am to much


#18

Chocolate has sugar in it and I’m pretty sure cocoa beans contain caffeine. I’m sure I would be a dysfunctional member of society if I couldn’t have my morning coffee and if chocolate was illegal I’m pretty sure if be at the nearest chocolate dealers house breaking the law


#19

Ohhhh, me too! DO NOT take away my caffeine or chocolate!


#20

Where I live, the only people who want it legalized
already use it.


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