Should we be willing to follow the truth where ever it leds us? Yes or No


#1

I posted this on another forum as well, but this forum get alot more action…

Socrates once said that he was will to follow the truth where ever it led him (BTW it led to his death).

Are we willing to do the same?

If you were wrong would you want to know it? Or would you be happy to remain in error if you were happy in that error?

On another thread I was discussing Catholic Tradition with a fellow poster (that is the “big T” tradition, not the “little t” tradition). We started to discuss the truth claims of our positions when the poster posted this:

“I will never get you to believe that Protestants have legitimate reasons for distrusting oral tradition and you will never get me to believe that traditions hold the same legitimacy as scripture.”

I responded by saying that I was open to changing my position if it were proven false, and that I, like Socrates, would follow the truth where ever it led me.

So, would you do the same? Even if it led you to believe something that was uncomfortable?

On a personal note:

I became Catholic in 2001 to the amazement and disbelief of many of my closest friend. I did this because I was convinced of the truth of the Catholic Church. It was not easy, actually it was very difficult. Former Protestants will understand what I am talking about. They will understand the response you get from your Protestant friends when you decide to become a member of the…gasp!.. Catholic Church.

Peace


#2

Yes, we must always follow the truth. The truth is not a thing, but a person. The Truth is Jesus Christ.


#3

Of course the answer is yes. Jesus said, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life”. That why I’m Catholic.

Dan L


#4

I answered “yes.” Even for those who don’t know Jesus is the Truth, all things being as they should, following the truth should lead them to Truth.

I think being open to being proved wrong really respects the truth of one’s convictions. If it could be proved that the resurrection was false, for instance, I would not be Christian. It would all be a lie. Or if the Church changed a core doctrine. People who say there is no possible evidence to dissuade them from being Christian, I think, make their faith irrational, and a sheer act of the will. I have a lot of other experience that the faith is true, and for me to change my belief would take an awful lot of contrary evidence. But I think real faith should never beyond the realm of evidence and experience.

The harder question is, are we willing to let other people follow the truth, as they see it, without forcing it down their thoat? I believe if we respect people’s freedom, they too will follow the truth to Truth (all things being as they should be). Unfortunately, all things are not as they should be, so people do fall into error. Are we willing to let people pass through error on their way to truth? I am pretty well convinced that the most strident anti-Christians are those whose family and friends did not respect their freedom to follow the truth.


#5

Absolutely, for otherwise we would be living a lie. This was my greatest challenge from leaving the Baptist faith into Catholicism. I DIDN’T WANT TO BE A CATHOLIC. Oh my God, perish the thought! It was like becoming a communist, when I was a zealous Baptist. I still wrestle with some issues, but truth is truth, especially CHURCH HISTORY. The only church Christ founded was the Catholic church.


#6

I agree with all the posters so far. That’s why all of us are Catholic. We followed the Truth to his Church. Keeping open the possibility (however small it may be) that what we believe is ultimately a lie, is the only rational thing to do. If I walked outside today and the sky was green, it would be silly for me to hold to the belief that the sky is blue. (By the way, the chance that Catholicism is false is roughly equal to the chance that the sky will be green the next time I look).

The reason that everyone is not Catholic, is because they do not seek the Truth first. They are happy where they are whether it be in a Baptsist Church, Mormon, Muslim, atheist, etc. To find truth would mean a serious lifestyle changes and the leaving of their comfort zone. I belive that the people who never come home to the Catholic Church are people who are either afraid or people who just don’t want to leave where they are because where they are is just too darn comfortable.

I often have to satisfy myself that I am in the place where the fullness of truth exists. I recently discovered that I didn’t know much about Mormons or Muslims. I did some research and was convinced that the origin of the two religions was too problematic to be the truth. In other words, there is no convincing evidence of their authority to teach truth. There is still more evidence for the Catholic Church being the place where the fullness of truth exists than for any other group.

BigJack


#7

[quote=BigJack1]The reason that everyone is not Catholic, is because they do not seek the Truth first. They are happy where they are whether it be in a Baptsist Church, Mormon, Muslim, atheist, etc. To find truth would mean a serious lifestyle changes and the leaving of their comfort zone. I belive that the people who never come home to the Catholic Church are people who are either afraid or people who just don’t want to leave where they are because where they are is just too darn comfortable.BigJack
[/quote]

I think that is a great point. Whether we are Catholic or not to accept the fullness of truth means changing the way we lead our lives. Few will accept such a radical notion.


#8

I was one who was kinda willing to follow the truth, but once I knew the truth, I had to then follow it as it hit me that I couldn’t live with myself without following the truth. The truth forced me to go to the Catholic Church. Now that I am back with the Church, I realize I had nothing to be afraid of, I just was prejudiced.

I thank God for the grace I have received to return to the Catholic Church.

So yes we should be willing to follow the truth, fear, misunderstanding and ego may stand in the way, but if you are honest with yourself you should follow the truth regardless of the obstacles.

God Bless
Scylla


#9

I thank God for the grace I have received to return to the Catholic Church.

Me too! What a blessing it has been.

Here’s a Truth story you may like:

Back in the 1920’s, my grandfather, who was a Southern Baptist living in South Carolina, went on a search for the Truth after making a promise to God. My aunt was a sickly child, and at one point was so dangerously ill that they feared for her life. My grandfather prayed to God, asking for His mercy to spare my aunt. He promised God that if He would spare her, he would then search out as many religions as he could to find the one that was the true way. My aunt did recover. So Grandfather did as he promised. He talked to many preachers and even a rabbi of the Jewish faith. He also talked to a Catholic priest. He realized that the Catholic Church was the True Church. The whole family converted.

This was a difficult thing to do back then, especially in the small town they lived in, and especially in the South. But my grandfather knew in his bones what the right path was. There was some ostricizing of the family. Some parents wouldn’t let their kids play with my mom and aunt and uncle. But they stayed strong in spite of it. Later, two more children were born and were also raised Catholic. Incidentally, one of them was my Aunt Martha, from who I get my user name! She has always been a strong Catholic example to me, and I was so glad to be able to tell her recently that I returned home to the Church.

I am so grateful for my grandfather’s searching and strength.


#10

I will follow the truth even if it is unpopular or against the majority.

Gods truth NEVER changes which is why I LOVE LOVE LOVE the Catholic Church.

I am so proud of the Catholic Church for never backing down or taking the easy popular and quiet road. What needs to be said is said!

"Now Christ said, “You will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” John 8:32
_________Pope John Paul II, Dilecti Amici


#11

Pope John Paul II once said: ***"****Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence."

***Thats enough of an invitation to me. I’m there and yes even if it lead to death.


#12

In this question we biring ourselves up against the reality of the meaning of truth in our society. For those who hold that truth is objective all things are ordered to someone other than ourselves. For those who believe that truth is relative and subjective then all things are ordered to self only.

st julie


#13

i took your question to mean truth with a “T”… if that is the case then I answered “yes”… otherwise, I would have to answer no…


#14

The obvious answer is “yes” but shouting so from the rooftops is an entirely different thing from actually acting it out. Many people have faced all kinds of odds, some small and some huge, and faced them with outstanding courage and conviction, for Truth.

Some are not so courageous. We’re told to fear not, yet some fear anyway. Wavering, doubtful, unable/unwilling to face the consequences, unable/unwilling to let go. Then, if they’re honest with themselves, having to acknowledge the fact that they may be treading dangerous ground, knowing they’re wimpy, feeling very unfaithful to God.

These people are in a difficult position, most especially those who realize their state of wimpiness and fence riding. It can be a torment.


#15

1 Tim. 3:15

The TRUTH is the CHURCH…

of course – follow it

because the “gates of heaven will never prevail!” Mat. 16

Blessings,
Joanie


#16

[quote=dennisknapp]I posted this on another forum as well, but this forum get alot more action…

Socrates once said that he was will to follow the truth where ever it led him (BTW it led to his death).

Are we willing to do the same?

If you were wrong would you want to know it? Or would you be happy to remain in error if you were happy in that error?

On another thread I was discussing Catholic Tradition with a fellow poster (that is the “big T” tradition, not the “little t” tradition). We started to discuss the truth claims of our positions when the poster posted this:

“I will never get you to believe that Protestants have legitimate reasons for distrusting oral tradition and you will never get me to believe that traditions hold the same legitimacy as scripture.”

I responded by saying that I was open to changing my position if it were proven false, and that I, like Socrates, would follow the truth where ever it led me.

So, would you do the same? Even if it led you to believe something that was uncomfortable?

On a personal note:

I became Catholic in 2001 to the amazement and disbelief of many of my closest friend. I did this because I was convinced of the truth of the Catholic Church. It was not easy, actually it was very difficult. Former Protestants will understand what I am talking about. They will understand the response you get from your Protestant friends when you decide to become a member of the…gasp!.. Catholic Church.

Peace
[/quote]


#17

From ArchBishop Fulton J. Sheen:
It is easy to find Truth; it is hard to face it, and harder still to follow it”.— Lift Up Your Heart


#18

[quote=dennisknapp]I posted this on another forum as well, but this forum get alot more action…

Socrates once said that he was will to follow the truth where ever it led him (BTW it led to his death).

Are we willing to do the same?

If you were wrong would you want to know it? Or would you be happy to remain in error if you were happy in that error?

On another thread I was discussing Catholic Tradition with a fellow poster (that is the “big T” tradition, not the “little t” tradition). We started to discuss the truth claims of our positions when the poster posted this:

“I will never get you to believe that Protestants have legitimate reasons for distrusting oral tradition and you will never get me to believe that traditions hold the same legitimacy as scripture.”

I responded by saying that I was open to changing my position if it were proven false, and that I, like Socrates, would follow the truth where ever it led me.

So, would you do the same? Even if it led you to believe something that was uncomfortable?

On a personal note:

I became Catholic in 2001 to the amazement and disbelief of many of my closest friend. I did this because I was convinced of the truth of the Catholic Church. It was not easy, actually it was very difficult. Former Protestants will understand what I am talking about. They will understand the response you get from your Protestant friends when you decide to become a member of the…gasp!.. Catholic Church.

Peace
[/quote]

If following the Truth led out of the CC, I hope I’d follow :slight_smile:


#19

I do try :slight_smile:


#20

What good is truth if its not true?


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