Should we follow the laws in the Old Testament?


#1

Are we supposed to? What does the Church teach on this subject?


#2

The Church teaches that of the three types of laws found in the Old Testament (moral, liturgical, dietary) Catholics are only required to follow the moral laws. The other two were for the specific dispensation of the Old Testament worship which was abolished with the New Covenant. Morality is intrinsic to holiness and is forever.


#3

Paul as a Pharisee knew that a Jew was supposed to be saved by following the Mosaic law. After his conversion he became convinced that Salvation is only through Jesus. He was able to convince Peter and James in Jerusalem that the gentiles did not have to become Jews and follow Mosaic Law to be saved. There was a struggle between some of the Jewish Christians and Paul for a time as they still wanted to hold on to at least a part of the dietary and liturgical laws, but in time Paul’s views won out. The moral codes, being based on Natural Law, did not go away for the new Christian. Today we follow the New Covenant and not the Covenant of God with Moses.


#4

That means we are free to eat all the bats we want? :smiley:

Lukelion


#5

[quote=Lukelion]That means we are free to eat all the bats we want? :smiley:

Lukelion
[/quote]

Chow down, pal. In Guam where I was stationed in the AF, they were considered a delicacy.


#6

Does the passage in Leviticus 19:28 about not tattooing yourself fall under the moral law of the Old Testament?


#7

Sounds like picking and choosing. If it sounded wrong that’s because you are using reasonable judgment, which how societies now do form laws.


#8

[quote="honestquestions, post:7, topic:28192"]
Sounds like picking and choosing. If it sounded wrong that's because you are using reasonable judgment, which how societies now do form laws.

[/quote]

On the Sermon on the Mount Jesus said He didn't come to abolish the Law and the Prophets but to fulfill them. He also told us this is accomplished when we love God with our whole heart, soul, mind, and strength and our neighbor as ourselves. To the extent that our morality, as well as civil laws, where applicable, are based on these two precepts as their standards, that morality and those laws are aligning themselves with Gods will.


#9

Here is a very interesting quote, re your question, from Pope Benedict's new book, page 38, -- "Jesus of Nazareth"-- "Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection" (bolded portion):

Saint Paul's enormous efforts to build up the Church of the Gentiles by developing a form of Christianity "free from the Law" had nothing to do with the Temple. His quarrel with the various currents within Jewish Christianity** revolved around the basic "customs" through which Jewish identity was expressed: circumcision, the Sabbath, food laws, purity regulations. ** While the question over the necessity of these "customs" for salvation gave rise to some fierce battles among Christians, too, leading ultimately to Paul's arrest in Jerusalem, strangely there is not a hint to be found anywhere of a dispute over the Temple and the necessity of its sacrifices, even though, according to the Acts of the Apostles, "a great many of the priests were obedient to the faith" (6:7).

I also found the last sentence above very interesting -- about no indication given in Scripture showing a need to cease OT sacrifices. God seems to have handled that one on His own -- with the destruction of the Temple.


#10

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