Should we pray the same way or a different everyday?


#1

I change the way I pray almost everyday. If I pray the same exact prayers the same way everyday I just do it to get it done or I become easily distracted. When I am tired or busy I hate to say it, but sometimes making time to pray certain prayers can be a pain. I do it anyway, because I feel obligated too and I feel that it positively effects my life.

Is there a big difference between praying prayers (Our Father, Hail Mary) and talking to God. A lot of times if I find myself talking to God I end up randomly ending it due to distraction and I feel that I talk nonsense.


#2

And that is why the Liturgy of the Hours rocks. Different everyday and yet the same.


#3

How is it different yet the same?


#4

Having a constant devotion is best.


#5

Do you mean a constant way to pray everyday? Like praying for friend and family in the morning and then praying the Our Father, hail Mary, etc.? Then in the evening or at night praying a psalm or 2, praying a few prayers from my prayer book, and reading one section of a chapter from an old testament book, one section from an epistle book, and one section from a gospel book?


#6

The structure remains the same every day generally. However every day different Psalms are said over four weeks, different readings and every so often saints are celebrated and of course over the year seasons are observed, changing the character of the prayers all the while sticking to the same pattern.


#7

For the readings, is it a set schedule? Or random like I tend to do. When I do readings daily I tend to ask God to give me direction. Where does one find Liturgy of the hours?


#8

At least trying to do certain devotionals everyday.


#9

The Liturgy of the Hours is the official prayer of the Catholic Church and its main format is a four volume set of books. However for laity a one volume book called Christian Prayer is also available.

It consists of seven prayers for different times of the day: Morning, Midmorning, Midday, Midafternoon, Evening, Night, and an Office of Readings which can be said at any time of the day. For laity, especially those just getting started, the Church encourages Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer; the “hinge” hours, as they’re called (an “hour” here is not 60 minutes; it’s a time of day according to the ancient Roman concept of watches; each prayer lasts about 15-20 minutes; as little as 5 minutes for Night Prayer). Don’t try to do all of them; you’re likely not a monk, but Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer are quite manageable.

If you want to get a taste of it, if you have an iPhone or Android device, download an app called iBreviary. It calculates for you the texts of the day so all you have to do is download and pray. Normally those who use books would set ribbons to the various parts of the Office.

Those of us who have adopted the Liturgy of the Hours as our prayer will attest to its value and power; it’s “addictive”, so to speak. This is because it consists primarily of Scripture, and is the Prayer of the Church, and so one who participates in that prayer, even when alone, takes on a kind of prayer that is extraordinarily powerful because the whole Church is offering it up.


#10

" Great is the mystery of the faith!" The Church professes this mystery in the Apostles’ Creed and celebrates it in the sacramental liturgy , so that the life of the faithful may be conformed to Christ in the Holy Spirit to the glory of God the Father . This mystery, then, requires that the faithful believe in it, that they celebrate it, and that they live from it in a vital and personal relationship with the living and true God. This relationship is prayer." (from the Catechism)

The greater part of this relationship is listening to God .


#11

Good to see you back, @Rob2! :slight_smile:


#12

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