Shrek 2 - gender confusion


#1

Sheesh. What are they thinking? :frowning:
[list]
*]Pinocchio likes to wear women’s underwear.
*]Many cross-dressing jokes.
*]The big bad wolf in Grandma’s nightgown is “gender-confused.”
*]The deep-voiced male bartender in wicked-stepsister drag
[/list]
But on a somewhat higher plane, there’s less flatulence and body-function humor.

Is this kid-appropriate at any age?


#2

I dont know that kids will really absorb any of these values a truths as long as they have had a proper moral education. Remember that its just entertainment, while some entertainment is terrible and imoral, I think that this (from what you said I havent seen the movie) is on the decent end of the spectrum.


#3

[quote=Tyler Smedley]I dont know that kids will really absorb any of these values a truths as long as they have had a proper moral education. Remember that its just entertainment
[/quote]

It’s a little tough to provide a proper moral education when society saturates with improper amoral/immoral content. A parent only has so much time.


#4

[quote=stumbler]Sheesh. What are they thinking? :frowning:
[list]
*]Pinocchio likes to wear women’s underwear.
*]Many cross-dressing jokes.
*]The big bad wolf in Grandma’s nightgown is “gender-confused.”
*]The deep-voiced male bartender in wicked-stepsister drag
[/list]
But on a somewhat higher plane, there’s less flatulence and body-function humor.

Is this kid-appropriate at any age?
[/quote]

This doesn’t sound appropriate for anybody, so it must be a disney movie.


#5

It was funny, I thought it poked fun at many of our societal issues, and holywood…We really should lighten up:dancing:


#6

Most of me wants to agree with Tyler’s assertions, but my involvement in academia makes me think better of the “just entertainment” sentiments. I took my 10 and 6 year-olds to see this on Friday and have a couple of thoughts on the transgendered agenda that is obviously present in the film.

First off, I enjoyed the movie. It was funny, and I found the ubiquitious references and allusions to Catholicism and medieval culture fairly interesting on an academic level (i.e. the Friar’s “Bob’s Big Boy” restaurant, etc).

However, there were too many references to the playful social acceptance of transgendered individuals to simply shrug it off. There is clearly an attempt in this film to present alternative sexual lifestyles as benign, humorous, and acceptable. I am not overeacting, nor am I suggesting that people boycott this film. I’m just positing what I know about pop culture and transgendered lifestyles, and I am sure that the depictions of said lifestyle in Shrek 2 are intentional and targeted. Please see the work of someone like Judith “Jack” Halberstam egomego.com/judith/home.htm as an example of the type of popular work that is being done by gender studies scholars in analyzing transgendered lifestyles in literature, film and art.

Oh, and expect it to continue. These folks know exactly what they are doing…


#7

The Catholic League has complained about Disney (and their ownership of some corporations who put out anti-catholic/christian kind of c.r.a.p.)


#8

I have not seen Shrek 2 (and based on this thread, I probably will not let my 13 year old see it.) I have watched the gay marriage and gay Protestant ministers/bishops and other gay agenda issues explode in the last few years. The gay agenda has been built up in a very purposeful and very calculated way in order to gain widespread acceptance of the homosexual lifestyle. Living in the NYC metropolitan area, I read the NYTimes and have been stunned by how the Times has slipped the gay lifestyle “innocuously” into so many articles over the last few years. Based on a number of articles recently in the NYTimes that are sympathetic to transgendered people, I predict that the transgendered issue (bisexual, transvestite, etc.) is the next frontier.


#9

I just got back from it and yes there were many sexual innuendoes, cross-dressing jokes, bathroom humor, etc., however, I thought that it was rather humorous. There were many subtle jokes (such as “Sir Justin” or the Starbucks) that were very entertaining. The US Conference of Catholic Bishops rated it A-II, for adults and adolescents. Check the review here out if you are considering bringing the young kids along. Personally, I think they will laugh at the bodily noises, but I would doubt that they will understand all of the innuendoes.


#10

I’m getting more and more disappointed in Disney and their movies. Disney used to produce movies that were age appropriate and now they are filled with this kind of garbage, not to mention the violence that their tv shows endorce. sigh:frowning: I realize that kids today are exposed to extremely immoral acts…but why do we have to have them exposed at ages 3!!! Why can’t they just have a childhood that’s full of fun, laughter and love…why do we have to expose them to grown up issues?


#11

Shrek is not a Disney movie. It is made by Dreamworks which is a competitor of Disney. Not every animated movie is made by Disney and many of the worst ones are made by competitors.


#12

Considering my apoplectic reaction at the end of Shrek when the cast of characters were doing the “outtakes” and the donkey burst into the song “I Like Big Butts”, I have always thought it was unlikely that we’d be taking our 11-year-old and 9-year-old to see Shrek 2.

There was already enough innuendo in the film to make me uncomfortable, even though I knew it was flying over the heads of my kids. But the “Big Butts” sequence didn’t. They’d never heard the song before, but they understood the words clearly and were staring at the screen with wide eyes, their mouths hanging open in shock.

That was the last straw for me.

For the record, I though the movie Shrek was funny – for grown ups. It isn’t, in my opinion, a movie for children. And the sequel probably isn’t either.


#13

I took my 12 and 8 year old daughters to see Shrek 2 just this afternoon…I guess I was glad it wasn’t any worse than it was. Unfortunately, kids in school talk that way all the time.

Hey, I’m listening to Catholic Answers Live on Sirius Radio on EWTN right now. God is good! :slight_smile:


#14

My wife and I saw Shrek (the original); my son did not. I agree that it was okay for adults. We review any movie before he gets to see it, so he didn’t see that one.

I also saw a TV commercial today for a “Shrek” toy; it “talks back” to you. A group of seven- and eight-year olds were gathered around it, and one of them asked, “Tell us a joke.” The toy replied in Eddie Murphy’s voice, “You wanna joke? Go look in a mirror!”

And I thought to myself, “What is this teaching these children? That it’s funny to be a smart-mouthed wise guy who makes nasty sarcastic comments to other people?”

They’ll get enough of that from their schoolmates as it is; I don’t need to buy them a toy that exacerbates the problem.


#15

First of all, did you READ Little Red Riding Hood? The wolf puts on Grandma’s night gown in the fairy tale to trick LRRH, not to gender-bend. I didn’t notice anything improper there and neither did my son.
Secondly, the “cross-dresser” was introduced as the Ugly Stepsister and my son just called her the “ugly lady” when I asked him about her later. He didn’t take her as a male cross-dresser.
Thirdly, Pinnochio wearing women’s underwear was a source of teasing for Pinnochio so to a child he would take the cross- dressing as a negative…something to be avoided(although you couldn’t get girls underwear on my son if you were Arnold Schwarzenegger).
All in all no big deal. With this film I believe the innocent eyes will see innocence. We need to lighten up.


#16

Todd, while I agree that we need to “lighten up” on the little things and allow our kids to learn to get along with others. But sheesh if we continue to “lighten up” our kids just might be one of the ones sending out gay marriage invitations! As a Christian parents, we are accountable for what we allow our children to participate in. My child won’t be seeing this movie. :wink:


#17

[quote=MeekoB]Shrek is not a Disney movie. It is made by Dreamworks which is a competitor of Disney. Not every animated movie is made by Disney and many of the worst ones are made by competitors.
[/quote]

Thank you Meeko, I didn’t know it wasn’t a Disney movie.


#18

I have to agree with Tmaque about the Wolf and the Ugly Stepsister - the Wolf was dressed like Grandma waiting for Red Riding Hood, and I took the male voice coming out of the Stepsister as just emphasizing that she is UG-LY. But I agree the part about Pinocchio in women’s underwear was too much.

But something that struck me more, that nobody has mentioned, was when Puss in Boots said he was related to the famous cat burglar Santiago de Compostela. Santiago de Compostela is a city in Spain that was an important pilgrimage site in the Middle Ages in honor of St. James the Greater, and I believe is still a shrine. Did they just pull a name with no idea of its significance, or was there some ulterior motive?

Either way, I agree with the USCCB rating - it’s not really for young kids.


#19

I don’t have kids (and I doubt that my husband will beg me to go see it with him) but my general movie rule is this:

If there is a belch in the commercial, I will not see it. :smiley:

It is amazing how many movies this rules out!


#20

Wow a new life rule!

The Belch Rule!

Can we amend it to make it the Belch-Fart Rule?

That will really cut out movies :smiley:


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