Shrimp Scampi vs Meatloaf (Lenten recipe planning to get around intent of Church law)

OK, big pet peeve of mine… Lenten recipe planning for Fridays. Baked Salmon, Shrimp Scampi, and other fish delicacies. Since I try to observe the no meat rule year round, this applies to me too. Yes, I’ve had shrimp on Fridays, what a no good hypocrite I am. :frowning: Expensive fish dishes are hardly a sacrifice. Meatloaf would be a better one for me, since I find it utterly boring and it’s a cheap dish.

How can we make our sacrifices more meaningful? I find myself so busy and my life so hectic, sometimes Friday goes by and I have lost track of the days of the week. Our modern 24/7 lives have wrecked the beautiful rythem of the Liturgical year. Many of us don’t work conventional 9-5 weekday hours anyways.

Anyone have any comments?

Friday is meatless, you don’t HAVE to eat fish. You can do simple things like something with beans and rice or some other meatless dish.

Although not required, I fast all through lent except for Sundays, so the sacrifice is 6 days a week, not just 1, and if I really am into the spirit, I will fast on friday, volunteer at a fish fry and not eat until after I get home. Let me tell you what, smelling all that fried fish, and seeing all the mac & cheese makes it a huge sacrifice.

There’s a lot of ideas, you just have to be creative about it. Invite someone to your house on Friday and feed them.

In all reality, what ever pennance you decide to do in place of or on top of meatless is ultimately up to you.

I think you have a good point (although grilled salmon is kind of basic for me) it is not to be a cause for feasting. Still, the fact that one has to go throughout the day conscious of diet still focuses the mind on the meaning of the day.

My other staples are fish sticks, baked tuna fish sandwiches (friday night buns) and pasta primivera.

[quote=spiritblows] Expensive fish dishes are hardly a sacrifice. Meatloaf would be a better one for me, since I find it utterly boring and it’s a cheap dish.

?
[/quote]

used to go every friday night to GF’s house after girl scouts, they always had salmon loaf, the single most revolting thing I have ever eaten in my life, you might try that if you want a real penance. served with ketchup and canned peas, and canned fruit cocktail.

to do Lent meatless, you really only need 10 supper recipes, because you eat meat on Sunday, go to the fish fry at Church or the Elks club on Friday, and can rotate the menu plan, so you have each dish 3 times.
our markets sell family size bags of frozen fish fillets that let you take out enough for one meal, easy to bake or poach, serve with a prepared or homemade creamy, cheezy or tomato-based sauce:
1.baked fish
2.poached fish
3. tuna casserole
4. tofu stir fry
5. spaghetti marinara
6. veggie lasagna
7. spinach ravioli
8. eggs and pancakes
9. french toast
10. Welsh rarebit, with scrambled eggs
11. mac n cheese, with soy franks or sausage if desired
12. soy brats with kraut, fries, cole slaw on whole grain buns
13. veggie burgers
14. taco salad with beans instead of meat, or soy burger crumbles, or soy taco filling
15. tacos with soy taco filling and all the toppings
16. main dish salad with grated cheese, hard boiled egg, albacore tuna or salmon
17/ quesadillas plus avocado, grilled veggies, rice & beans
18. paella, rice from a mix plus various sea food-shrimp, scallops, clams whatever your family likes.
19. Uncle Ben’s long grain+wild rice mix, frozen or thawed crabmeat (or the imitation crabmeat), frozen tiny green peas with onions, canned or homemade cream sauce.
20. stuffed baked potatoes with cheese, scrambled or hardboiled eggs, broccoli, imitation bacon bits etc. with a hearty salad.

bocaburger and morningstar farms make good soy burgers and sausages, tasty, but so different from real meat that they are a penance for red meat lovers.

[quote=puzzleannie]used to go every friday night to GF’s house after girl scouts, they always had salmon loaf, the single most revolting thing I have ever eaten in my life, you might try that if you want a real penance. served with ketchup and canned peas, and canned fruit cocktail.
[/quote]

Sounds like purgatory on earth! :smiley:

Dear PuzzleAnnie,
Thanks for the recipe suggestions… :smiley: Those dishes should greatly advance my spiritual life… :wink:

Now you’ve done it. You went and exposed me.


Now I’ll have to give up my macadamia nut encrusted salmon :frowning:
Maybe just a simple smoked mullet.

[quote=spiritblows]How can we make our sacrifices more meaningful? I find myself so busy and my life so hectic, sometimes Friday goes by and I have lost track of the days of the week. Our modern 24/7 lives have wrecked the beautiful rythem of the Liturgical year. Many of us don’t work conventional 9-5 weekday hours anyways. Anyone have any comments?
[/quote]

Friday sacrifices in general (not just Lent) . . . make it something meaningful to you. For a while, the only beverage I had on Fridays was water - no soda, no coffee etc. It was really a challenge. For some reason, on Fridays, I’d really want coffee or soda! It didn’t happen on Thursday or Saturday. It was a great sacrifice; I should probably go back to it. —KCT

…add these choices to your Lenten menu…

Lentil soup

Splitpea soup

Black bean soup

Meatless minestrone soup

Skip the Friday night fishfry from your favorite eatery! We all know what a treat it really is! :wink:

Now I LOVE all the soup mentioned above …yet there is something much more modest about eating these. The money saved from eating these very inexpensive soups can be alms in the Sunday collection.

**Our family staple was Tuna Noodle Casserole. A very humble dish. Problem is…I LOVE IT!! So no meat, but not a “real” sacrafice?

Another thing we used to have was Grilled Cheese Sandwiches with Tomato soup. Really tasty during Lent.

But nothing can beat homemade Mac and Cheese. Since I don’t make it that well, I usually skip it.

Stoffers makes great vegetable lasagna. Just pop in the oven.

But you know what’s strange? Every Friday during Lent, I can’t find a place to eat that isn’t absolutely crowded (lunch and dinner), but on Sundays, where are all these people?**

[quote=contemplative]…add these choices to your Lenten menu…

Lentil soup

Splitpea soup

Black bean soup

Meatless minestrone soup…
[/quote]

That is, Lenten soup, right?:rotfl:

[quote=spiritblows]OK, big pet peeve of mine… Lenten recipe planning for Fridays. Baked Salmon, Shrimp Scampi, and other fish delicacies. Since I try to observe the no meat rule year round, this applies to me too. Yes, I’ve had shrimp on Fridays, what a no good hypocrite I am. :frowning: Expensive fish dishes are hardly a sacrifice. Meatloaf would be a better one for me, since I find it utterly boring and it’s a cheap dish.

How can we make our sacrifices more meaningful? I find myself so busy and my life so hectic, sometimes Friday goes by and I have lost track of the days of the week. Our modern 24/7 lives have wrecked the beautiful rythem of the Liturgical year. Many of us don’t work conventional 9-5 weekday hours anyways.

Anyone have any comments?
[/quote]

We have never given up the practice of fish on Fridays.
It is expected that any Friday of the year we eat fried catfish and french fries. I feel a little guilty because I like fried catfish, but I also try to fast.
God bless,
maggiec

Ugh…salmon. I can’t even stand to be in a room where it’s been cooked.

I think we really have to look for things to make the Friday fast meaningful. How much do we suffer or learn when we can have cheese encilladas, with meatless chili verde over them? What about a gaucamole, bean, rice, and cheese-stuffed sopapilla smothered in the same? Not much of a sacrifice. I’ve often wondered why we didn’t do what our Orthodox brethren and I assume our Eastern Catholic brothers and sisters do: no meat, no dairy, no eggs, etc.

[quote=JKirkLVNV]Ugh…salmon. I can’t even stand to be in a room where it’s been cooked.

I think we really have to look for things to make the Friday fast meaningful. How much do we suffer or learn when we can have cheese encilladas, with meatless chili verde over them? What about a gaucamole, bean, rice, and cheese-stuffed sopapilla smothered in the same? Not much of a sacrifice. I’ve often wondered why we didn’t do what our Orthodox brethren and I assume our Eastern Catholic brothers and sisters do: no meat, no dairy, no eggs, etc.
[/quote]

Exactly my point! :thumbsup:

What is the essence of making a sacrifice?

Given we are not supposed to injure ourselves … so complete fasts without a doctor’s supervision are not permitted, and besides we have duties to perform, taking care of our families. If we were living in cloistered monasteries, then we could engage in total fasts.

Not allowed to hurt ourselves by pounding nails into ourselves.

Can’t give away all our money; don’t have THAT much anyway and have responsibilities to family.

One priest friend said that if you want to engage in mortification of the flesh, then EAT YOUR VEGETABLES. Force yourself to eat well balanced meals.

But if you’re like me, I don’t care much one way or the other what I eat. Or even if I skip a meal or two.

So, I don’t know…

Maybe giving up fasting would be an appropriate sacrifice, since we desire it so much.

;^)

[quote=Al Masetti]What is the essence of making a sacrifice?

Given we are not supposed to injure ourselves … so complete fasts without a doctor’s supervision are not permitted, and besides we have duties to perform, taking care of our families. If we were living in cloistered monasteries, then we could engage in total fasts.

Not allowed to hurt ourselves by pounding nails into ourselves.

Can’t give away all our money; don’t have THAT much anyway and have responsibilities to family.

One priest friend said that if you want to engage in mortification of the flesh, then EAT YOUR VEGETABLES. Force yourself to eat well balanced meals.

But if you’re like me, I don’t care much one way or the other what I eat. Or even if I skip a meal or two.

So, I don’t know…

Maybe giving up fasting would be an appropriate sacrifice, since we desire it so much.

;^)
[/quote]

It’s all so individual! Good post, Al.

I try to stay away from the shell fish and crustacians on Fridays during Lent. That leaves me with tuna, cod, and seabass on that day since I cannot stand the taste of most fish since a food posioning a few years back.

PF

[quote=JKirkLVNV]Ugh…salmon. I can’t even stand to be in a room where it’s been cooked.

I think we really have to look for things to make the Friday fast meaningful. How much do we suffer or learn when we can have cheese encilladas, with meatless chili verde over them? What about a gaucamole, bean, rice, and cheese-stuffed sopapilla smothered in the same? Not much of a sacrifice. I’ve often wondered why we didn’t do what our Orthodox brethren and I assume our Eastern Catholic brothers and sisters do: no meat, no dairy, no eggs, etc.
[/quote]

The no meat, dairy, or eggs is what I’m thinking about doing. I eat a mostly vegetarian diet (and I can’t stand most fish), so skipping meat for me on Friday is no big deal at all. But, eliminating all animal products is a big deal, plus I’ll try to give up something else, something that is a staple of my diet.

Grilled cheese and potato soup were Lenten staples at my house growing up!

Thai Peanut Pasta–
1/3 Cup creamy peanut butter
1/3 Cup water
2 Tbs plus 1tsp rice wine vinegar
2 Tbs plus 1tsp lite soy sauce
2 crushed garlic cloves
2 tsp light brown sugar
3/4 tsp hot-pepper sauce
Mix together in a bowl.

Boil some water and then add to 8 oz capellinni pasta and 2 cups of chopped broccolli. By the time the pasta is al dente the broccolli will be finished cooking. Drain the pasta and mix with the sauce.
For garnish prepare 3 green onions thinly sliced and 1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro.
I like to serve this either alone or wrapped in a lettuce leaf. Yum!
My kids love it too! They call it peanut butter pasta!

[quote=beckyann2597]Thai Peanut Pasta–
1/3 Cup creamy peanut butter
1/3 Cup water
2 Tbs plus 1tsp rice wine vinegar
2 Tbs plus 1tsp lite soy sauce
2 crushed garlic cloves
2 tsp light brown sugar
3/4 tsp hot-pepper sauce
Mix together in a bowl.

Boil some water and then add to 8 oz capellinni pasta and 2 cups of chopped broccolli. By the time the pasta is al dente the broccolli will be finished cooking. Drain the pasta and mix with the sauce.
For garnish prepare 3 green onions thinly sliced and 1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro.
I like to serve this either alone or wrapped in a lettuce leaf. Yum!
My kids love it too! They call it peanut butter pasta!
[/quote]

Hey, if your kids love it, I’ll try it! Thanks!

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