Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday

Does everyone here intend to be shriven next Tuesday and receive the ashes next day?

And will you feel comfortable going about with the ashes afterwards for all to see?

I have no problem being seen with ashes. It’s no big deal.

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I’ve never done Shrove Tuesday myself. I’ll be at work that day/night so just a normal day for me. Ash Wednesday I’d like to go but will have to see what time they’re offering Mass as I have an appointment that day. I will be off work so I’ll probably be able to go. Might be an evening service so not much chance to show the ashes to others.

Confession is not offered many places around here on Tuesday (in fact, can’t think of any). But paczkis are plentiful, and the more typical way Fat Tuesday is celebrated here.

I don’t know anyone who has a problem with leaving the ashes on all day – it’s pretty typical for Catholics, Lutherans, Episcopalians and some others.

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Is there a specific reason you are asking everyone what they will be doing? Will you be attending an Ash Wednesday Mass and then wearing the ashes as long as they last?
Are you in two minds about wearing the ashes? If so that is quite normal , some do , some dont.
Sometimes the ashes are barely visible.

I have missed shrove tuesday for many years due to work and yet next week I have to attend a disciplinary hearing so as I was looking forward to pancakes with my family for the first time on this day for many years now I don’t care. Ash Wednesday I have missed for the same reason but my wife is working this time so no to that too.

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I wear the ashes but it always draws comment. Last year a Scottish member of parliament was abused for doing so in parliament.

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You will need to make the decision to defend your faith, or hide it. We must all make that decision, even sometimes amongst fellow Catholics. I pray for courage and humility daily.

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I generally get ashes in the morning and wear them all day till they wear off. It’s no big deal. Nobody says boo about it around here.

Especially now that half the Protestants in this area are running around getting ashes themselves.
One year they actually had a bunch of Protestant ministers on the subway platforms, handing out ashes to commuters.

I don’t usually do much for Shrove Tuesday. Mardi Gras was not possible for me this year. Maybe I’ll get a big plate of pancakes at the diner.

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Ash Wednesday Mass is in the evening here. We don’t get to wear ashes all day long.

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Have no problem walking around with ashes here. I also have no problem with my medals around my neck. These days most people just mind their own business. At least that’s been my experience.

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I’ll wear the ashes all day. I learned some people I’ve known were Catholic, that I didn’t know before.

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Paczki day in Parma, Ohio is just insane. I remember the year I went they had news crews, a DJ playing polkas, kielbasa, and beer on tap for everybody waiting on line for their paczki at 8 in the morning.

Around here one can get fasnachts but to get the good ones you also have to drive quite a ways, get there early and stand in very long lines at the churches and shops that are renowned for having the best ones. One Catholic church that cooks their own does a land-office business into the wee hours of the night for about 3 days.

I invite you all to try it in Europe. You will be surprised how intolerant people are here, especially in France.

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Is it wrong I’ve always lived in metro Detroit and never had a paczki?

It took me till I was in my 40s to have one. Once I had one, I realized it was about the same thing as I’d been eating for 40 years and calling a “Jelly Donut”.

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I will discuss this further in the hope it helps make a decision. As in we even need courage at times, amongst our own Catholic brothers and sisters.
Recently I was sitting next to a woman at Mass, at the very back of the Cathedral and up one level, so no easy access to the celebrating Priest. This woman was perhaps drug affected, perhaps not. She had been quite disruptive during the Mass. She returned to her seat with the Eucharist and promptly began doing the wrong thing with the Eucharist. People were watching, but not speaking up, I did speak up and got quite firm with her, and upset her quite a bit, in demanding she stop what she was doing and either take the Eucharist or give it up to someone if she felt she could not take it. She claimed it would choke her. Even those laity who hand out the Eucharist around us were very reluctant to speak up and did not. I do not hand out the Eucharist, so had no training in this type of issue. Sometimes we need courage even amongst our own. I spoke to the Priest later, he had been made aware of the issue and was very appreciative that people were informing him. He had also noticed her disruptiveness during the Mass.
If I had not spoken up she would have taken the Eucharist home in her handbag, or scattered the Eucharist around the pew.

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I agree, your example though different is not off point. We live in times when even small gestures can be a risk; all the more reason to take the risk.

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You learn something new every day. I had never wondered why Shrove Tuesday was called that - mainly because I tend to call it by it’s French name. But when I saw the word “shriven”, I had to look it up. Around these parts it’s more commonly known as Pancake Tuesday and there’s a pancake breakfast put on by the college and usually a pancake supper put on by one of the churches.

I’m working that day so no opportunity to be shriven but I’ll be at Mass Wednesday evening and will go up for the imposition of ashes. I’ll wash them off before I go to bed.

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Do you use the expression in the US “to give someone short shrift?”

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