Sigh. I wish my family was religious


#1

I recently started going to church again (yay me!) However, my family does not follow suit. :( it's sad for many reasons... But it gets me down and I've cried several times over this matter. It makes me feel like a freak and an outcast when I'm the only one going out of my family (of 3 other people). It's especially odd/awkward if I see family friends at church because I think they're saying to themselves 'wow where's the family? They always used to come!' and gossip, etc.

Has anyone else been in this situation? I almost cried during the last Mass I was at and I prayed that God remove the sorrow from my heart. I guess He wanted to answer me because I haven't felt the same way since.

Also, what're some ways I can get them back (without sounding too weird)? Are there any prayers/Novenas/Chaplets I can say for their conversion? They're all Catholic (well, 'Catholic') so it would be a conversion of heart.

Thank you,
coolduude


#2

My family’s in the same situation as yours. All you really can do is pray and live by example. And never stop talking!

I’ll pray for you!


#3

In my family, most of the people do not go to mass regularly. The difficulty comes in that they are so filled with errors that it is difficult to even begin to try to get them to come back. My one cousin believes because of a college comparative religion class that all religions are basically the same. Others are more hostile. I worry about their salvation. It makes me sorrowful to think that they may not make it to heaven. None of them ever cite science for the lack of belief. Some are upset at something that has happened in life or about the question of evil in the world. Some simply do not care about religion.

I think that to provide an example with actions can go a long way. Perseverance is a great virtue when you are lonely and feel abandoned by relatives in your spiritual journey. The one thing you have to do is always stand your ground and give a good defense of the faith.


#4

Yes, providing a good example is a good thing to do when the family around you aren't believers.
Being peaceful and calm in all the situations that come up is important.

Cooldude, try not to be sad about it, or let it get you down. Thank the Lord that you have the gift of faith, and cooperate with Him on increasing it.

One of Padre Pio's favorite sayings is "Pray, hope, and don't worry." Remember that!


#5

[quote="Dorothy, post:4, topic:189898"]
Yes, providing a good example is a good thing to do when the family around you aren't believers.
Being peaceful and calm in all the situations that come up is important.

Cooldude, try not to be sad about it, or let it get you down. Thank the Lord that you have the gift of faith, and cooperate with Him on increasing it.

One of Padre Pio's favorite sayings is "Pray, hope, and don't worry." Remember that!

[/quote]

Great advice!:thumbsup: The whole post is great advice as well.


#6

I’m in the same situation. I just started going to church and my family doesn’t.

I don’t have the problem of friends at church, though. I don’t have any friends at church. I’m completely alone (with Jesus of course :thumbsup:).

I cry a lot, especially when my family makes disparaging remarks about the Catholic Church or Christianity in general.

i would love to know some prayers too.


#7

Hi everybody:

I'm kind of in the same situation, but, and this is a big but, my mom's a Lutheran minister and my dad just goes along with her (in other words, he doesn't really care one way or the other). My sister's Catholic too (we're both converts [though you couldn't tell upon meeting her]), but it's tough being the only Catholic in the household. To boot, because I converted at a university parish back east, the priest/chaplain is quite liberal, and he lets virtually anyone he knows of that is even remotely like Catholic in their thinking to receive. Before I realized I shouldn't go up to receive , he allowed me carte-blanche as well (before I converted). As a result, whenever my mom comes with me to Mass on Saturday nights, she goes up at Communion time like everyone else. Clearly she shouldn't, but God forbid I tell her so. Fr. M. told me I can go up, so why shouldn't I, is her thinking, and she won't see it any other way. Frustrating is not the half of it.:shrug:

Chantal


#8

Hi Coolduude,

                 I understand your situation and would say Pray, Pray, Pray the ROSARY.

Ask the Blessed Mother Mary to intercede in prayer for your familys conversion. It’s obvious Christ is starting with you first. I would also pray the Divine Mercy at this time.

                  ChanatlM I'm horrified :eek: that your mom is taking communion and she is not Catholic, it's dangerous for her to be consuming the Eucharist if she is not in accord with the church. Please seek guidance and directon from your priest or go to the Bishop for help. This is not something to take lightly at all, it is detrimental. What happens when we Catholics don't go to confession and consume the Eucharist when we are in moratl sin??? :eek:

What happens when a protestant is at mass and decides to go up to communion like everyone else?, it is detrimental to your mothers soul. Please seek guidance and direction from the magestarium.

             God Bless You both, your'e in my prayers!:)

#9

I know that it’s against Church rules for a non-Catholic to receive communion (which is why I never receive when I attend mass with my wife). But, how is it dangerous?


#10

I too was a little caught off guard by the word dangerous in this post, and it made me think a little bit. After a little thought, I have decided I agree with Khrystyne and here is my reasoning (but by no means am I trying to speak for Khrystyne).

Why is it dangerous for a non-Catholic to receive communion?

Well, first of all, we can probably presume that the non-Catholic in question does not understand the significance of what he/she is doing, so as long as no malicious intent is involved, I would not say it is necessarily dangerous to his/her soul.

But, it is dangerous in the following two ways (there may be others):

  1. we do believe the eucharist is Christ and as such must be treated with the utmost respect. If wide-spread reception of the Eucharist occurs by those who do not share the belief, there will obviously be more instances of absue of the hosts, since it just isn’t that important to these people.

  2. It is dangerous in that it engenders a false since of unity, which in turn harms true ecemunical action. Communion is a (perhaps the) sign of unity of faith. Reception of communion across the boundaries of our faiths in a very real way hides the scandal of disunity among christians. But this is not something to be hidden, as such it will never be solved.


#11

I was in your situation except that my parents were raised Lutheran, and never had me baptised... so I attended mass from age 16-19 before I went through RCIA and received all the sacraments of initiation.

I know how it feels.

You know what though? You might not believe this, but I am sure your parents look up to you for going to mass and seeking God. They will see you in a good light and if they ever feel like going back to mass, they will know they can go with you. Your actions are doing good for others. Trust me on this, and continue to pray for them.


#12

[quote="coolduude, post:1, topic:189898"]
I recently started going to church again (yay me!) However, my family does not follow suit. :( it's sad for many reasons... But it gets me down and I've cried several times over this matter. It makes me feel like a freak and an outcast when I'm the only one going out of my family (of 3 other people). It's especially odd/awkward if I see family friends at church because I think they're saying to themselves 'wow where's the family? They always used to come!' and gossip, etc.

Has anyone else been in this situation? I almost cried during the last Mass I was at and I prayed that God remove the sorrow from my heart. I guess He wanted to answer me because I haven't felt the same way since.

Also, what're some ways I can get them back (without sounding too weird)? Are there any prayers/Novenas/Chaplets I can say for their conversion? They're all Catholic (well, 'Catholic') so it would be a conversion of heart.

Thank you,
coolduude

[/quote]

I'm in a similar situation.... my family goes to mass every sunday but then forgets about being catholic the rest of the week... no rosary, no prayers together as a family... you wouldnt even be able to disguish us from the secularist family down the street.

Pray for more Catholic Families in the world who will give witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ!

Your brother in Christ,
Zachary


#13

Same problem here, coolduude....our family seems either very cold towards Catholicism or they are religious but are totally anti-Catholic. It is very hurtful. We try not to say anything derogatory to them but it is difficult to bite one's tongue at times.
All we do is just pray, pray, pray!!!


#14

I’m in the same boat, I have a husband and a 21 year old son that doesn’t go to Mass. In the 28 years we have been married he has never gone to Mass with me outside of funerals, weddings, Holy Commuion, Confirmation etc. When I talk about God etc. they think I’m loopy - we are all cradle Catholics! :*(


#15

Jesus taught us; "When they deliver you up, do not be anxious how you are to speak or what you are to say; for what you are to say will be given to you in that hour; 20 for it is not you who speak, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you. 21 Brother will deliver up brother to death, and the father his child, and children will rise against parents and have them put to death; and you will be hated by all for my name's sake. But he who endures to the end will be saved." (Mt 10:19-22)

Yesterdays Gospel reading started with; *"Truly, I say to you, no prophet is acceptable in his own country." (Lk 4:24)
*

Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, Ora Pro Nobis Peccatoribus!

mark


#16

[quote="tafan, post:10, topic:189898"]
I too was a little caught off guard by the word dangerous in this post, and it made me think a little bit. After a little thought, I have decided I agree with Khrystyne and here is my reasoning (but by no means am I trying to speak for Khrystyne).

Why is it dangerous for a non-Catholic to receive communion?

Well, first of all, we can probably presume that the non-Catholic in question does not understand the significance of what he/she is doing, so as long as no malicious intent is involved, I would not say it is necessarily dangerous to his/her soul.

But, it is dangerous in the following two ways (there may be others):

1) we do believe the eucharist is Christ and as such must be treated with the utmost respect. If wide-spread reception of the Eucharist occurs by those who do not share the belief, there will obviously be more instances of absue of the hosts, since it just isn't that important to these people.

2) It is dangerous in that it engenders a false since of unity, which in turn harms true ecemunical action. Communion is a (perhaps the) sign of unity of faith. Reception of communion across the boundaries of our faiths in a very real way hides the scandal of disunity among christians. But this is not something to be hidden, as such it will never be solved.

[/quote]

I was told by my priest years ago that it is dangerous to consume the Eucharist if you are in mortal sin, "it" the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ would condemn a person at death due to being in the state of mortal sin. Thinking of a protestant person consuming the Eucharist (someone who protests the Church) thinking the Eucharist is only a wafer would not negate what the Eucharist actually is, Jesus Christ.
The Catholic Church is not just another Christian denominaton, the Catholic Church is THE church which Christ founded regardless if you believe it or not, to your own souls detriment.
I wouldn't want to assume or take lightly such an irreverant act for the sake of my eternal soul.

God Bless:)


#17

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