sign of peace


#1

I was visiting in a different parish last Sunday. The Mass was exactly the same except: The Priest said “Peace be with you” and the congregation said “and also with you”. He did not say anything about offering each other the sign of peace. He went right on with Lamb of God.

Some in the congregation were offering each other peace during the Lamb of God, but most were not. Has anyone ever ran into this before? Why would the Priest leave that part out?

After Mass, the processional did not go back down the aisle, but to the side and directly to the room where the priest puts on his robes. (I am having a complete mental block on correct names for things, sorry) Then, we never saw the Priest after Mass anywhere.
Just seemed a little strange. Any idea’s?


#2

The individual exchange of the sign of peace is an option that seemingly 99% of the priests take. But it is not required. They do not do it, for example, on the daily EWTN Masses.

Marc

[quote=midwest mom]I was visiting in a different parish last Sunday. The Mass was exactly the same except: The Priest said “Peace be with you” and the congregation said “and also with you”. He did not say anything about offering each other the sign of peace. He went right on with Lamb of God.

Some in the congregation were offering each other peace during the Lamb of God, but most were not. Has anyone ever ran into this before? Why would the Priest leave that part out?

After Mass, the processional did not go back down the aisle, but to the side and directly to the room where the priest puts on his robes. (I am having a complete mental block on correct names for things, sorry) Then, we never saw the Priest after Mass anywhere.
Just seemed a little strange. Any idea’s?
[/quote]


#3

[quote=MarcPekny]The individual exchange of the sign of peace is an option that seemingly 99% of the priests take. But it is not required. They do not do it, for example, on the daily EWTN Masses.

Marc
[/quote]

I would say that in 20% of our five Sunday masses, there is no handshake of peace. Honestly, I would prefer that they not do it at this time of year in MI. I homeschool so my kids are not exposed to the cold and flu germs going around. The only place is at church and I feel it is crass to break out the Purell in the middle of Mass!


#4

[quote=midwest mom]I was visiting in a different parish last Sunday. The Mass was exactly the same except: The Priest said “Peace be with you” and the congregation said “and also with you”. He did not say anything about offering each other the sign of peace. He went right on with Lamb of God.
?
[/quote]

Our has suspended the sign of peace until the cold and flu season is over. I do miss it though.


#5

i can take it or leave it… were it up to me to decide, i would leave it…:cool:

http://www.lifestylemanagement.net/images/shake_hands.jpg


#6

I never liked the meet and greet… Wish they would just say the words but not make us extend handshakes or hugs or kisses or what not. My cousins were msgrs (gone to the great big guy in the sky now) and they never let anyone shake hands. I didn’t know it was an option and I don’t shake hands with anyone anyway, I’ll acknowledge people or if they thrust a hand at me I’ll do it, but otherwise you can get away with not shaking hands if you appear to not want to.


#7

=midwest mom]I
Some in the congregation were offering each other peace during the Lamb of God, but most were not. Has anyone ever ran into this before? Why would the Priest leave that part out?

Here in Ireland we mostly offer the sign of peace, but not always, to be honest I find it boring and insincere, it’s habitual and I’d rather not do it.


#8

I have never been to a mass without the “sign of peace”. Though I shake a few hands around me, could take it or leave it too. I would like go to an EWTN mass sometime and definitely would think it’s worth it to skip the “sign of peace” to see one of those masses.


#9

I could take or leave the “sign of peace” and especially would not miss it going to an EWTN mass.


#10

I love it except when flu season is very bad and everyone is sick. I find most people very sincere in Baltimore. Some people even run out of the pews. When the Pope came 50,000 People offered a sign of peace. The people who do not like it sit there with their arms folded.


#11

The sign of peace is very distracting, especially at a time when you should be focused on the altar. It turns into a big social fiasco. My pet peeve is when people never get done with it. They wave, then they motion with their finger and are looking for anyone who will acknowlege them, meanwhile, the priest is waiting to resume the Mass. :eek: At my parish, we have no greeting of peace at all now, and I hope it doesn’t resume. Usually, the sign of peace is before Mass begins. :cool:


#12

[quote=(Joshua)]Here in Ireland we mostly offer the sign of peace, but not always, to be honest I find it boring and insincere, it’s habitual and I’d rather not do it.
[/quote]

I’m Irish too. I’ve noticed that in the smaller towns where the populations are smaller the sign of peace is used less. But in the cities and bigger towns it is used almost always.

Personally, I think it’s one of the best parts of the mass. If we take it seriously it really symbolises what Christianity is about: Fellowship, reaching out to your neighbour and sharing your love with everyone around you.


#13

The sign of peace doesn’t have to be done at every single Mass.
It’s up to the priest.

As far as the priest proceeding directly to the sacristy, that would usually occur in a church which was built with the sacristy to the side instead of in the back. Often, even in such churches, the priest and servers will still process to the back for the exit. In the old Mass, it was customary for the priest and servers to enter and exit from the side.


#14

Thanks for the info. I really need to get out more. (Or study my religion more).

I don’t particularly like offering the sign of peace. My parish likes to turn it into “coffee and donuts”. Drives our priest nuts.


#15

[quote=Sowndog]I’m Irish too. I’ve noticed that in the smaller towns where the populations are smaller the sign of peace is used less. But in the cities and bigger towns it is used almost always.

Personally, I think it’s one of the best parts of the mass. If we take it seriously it really symbolises what Christianity is about: Fellowship, reaching out to your neighbour and sharing your love with everyone around you.
[/quote]

Welcome, well when I shake hands with someone I do it from my heart, if you know what I mean.
When I shake hands at Mass I don’t do it with sincerity, more like a chore.
I could say I like the sign of peace at Mass, but then I’d be lying, and that wouldn’t do, now would it ? :nope:


#16

On a recent business trip to Korea, I attended Mass as the Cathedral in Seoul.

The “Kiss of Peace” involved everyone bowing to those near them :slight_smile:


#17

[quote=JimG]The sign of peace doesn’t have to be done at every single Mass.
It’s up to the priest.

[/quote]

Technically, it’s up to the Deacon, if one is present. (GIRM 181)


#18

[quote=midwest mom]I was visiting in a different parish last Sunday. The Mass was exactly the same except: The Priest said “Peace be with you” and the congregation said “and also with you”. He did not say anything about offering each other the sign of peace. He went right on with Lamb of God.

Some in the congregation were offering each other peace during the Lamb of God, but most were not. Has anyone ever ran into this before? Why would the Priest leave that part out?

After Mass, the processional did not go back down the aisle, but to the side and directly to the room where the priest puts on his robes. (I am having a complete mental block on correct names for things, sorry) Then, we never saw the Priest after Mass anywhere.
Just seemed a little strange. Any idea’s?
[/quote]

I used to attend a parish, maybe even the one you went to, midwest mom, where they didn’t have the parishioners offer the sign of peace either. However, if it’s a large mass, and there is at least one deacon, the priest and deacon would do a motion which would look like they were grasping each other’s shoulders. That is, technically, the sign of peace. I’m not sure, but I think you’ll also find a similar gesture in the 1962 missal.

I personally think that, if there is to be a sign of peace, it should take place at the beginning of mass, not in the middle of the eucharistic liturgy.


#19

[quote=coeyannie]The sign of peace is very distracting, especially at a time when you should be focused on the altar. It turns into a big social fiasco. My pet peeve is when people never get done with it. They wave, then they motion with their finger and are looking for anyone who will acknowlege them, meanwhile, the priest is waiting to resume the Mass. :eek: At my parish, we have no greeting of peace at all now, and I hope it doesn’t resume. Usually, the sign of peace is before Mass begins. :cool:
[/quote]

you said it… my feelings exactly… :thumbsup:


#20

My pet peeve from many years of going to Mass alone without family or friends around me was being totally ignored until everyone else had finished greeting their family members & friends, and then finally people would turn and notice poor little old me. In my flights of fancy I thought it would be nice if at this point people would think about how we are one body, all brothers and sisters in the Lord, and turn first to exchange the sign of peace with someone they don’t know. But everyone else seems to think I’m nuts.


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