Sign of the Cross is a Ancient Christian tradition.


#1

The Sign of the Cross is an ancient Christian tradition. Yet there are Non-Catholic Christians who says it is Satan, like some posters in here.

How can it be Satan? It’s not an upside cross. It’s not even upside down. Who came up with this idea that it is Satanic?

Are Non-Catholic Christians, who know little about Catholicism, really that ignorant?

I like some feedback…


#2

The idea that it is an upside down cross comes from the fact that the path of signing forms an upside down T. This is seen to be an upside down cross, and many portrayals of the crucifixion show the two thieves on crosses of a T-shape.

According to ancient tradition, Peter was crucified upside down. Does this mean that the Apostle himself was Satanic? I find it hard to believe that an inspired writer of Scripture were Satan himself.


#3

I just read your post…

Maybe the whole upside down cross = satanic

Has to indirectly do with Peter…

This is just a random thought that I had after reading your post.

Peter was hung up side down (according to tradition)

One of the bible passages Christ tells Peter “get behind me satan” (I can’t think of the verse now)

Maybe that is where the whacky idea started from…

Again just a random thought, but thought I would share!
Again it’s just a thought I had…


#4

Just last night I was reading The Founding of Christendom by historian Warren Carroll, pages 399-400.

Evidently the Ethiopian eunuch of Acts 8:27 who was converted to Christianity went back to his native land and introduced Christianity there.

The reason for this assumption is that, 300 years later when Christian missionaries finally arrived in remote Ethiopia near the upper Nile, they found people there who knew the sign of the cross, although they had forgotten its meaning.

So, yes, the sign of the cross is an ancient Christian tradition.

-JohnPaul


#5

Peter was crucified upside down because he felt unworthy of the same passion as Christ. Humility not satan.


#6

Maybe I’m doing it wrong, when I sign myself, I don’t actually touch my shoulders, so actually it is more of a + sign.
Does that make it invalid?

:o


#7

I read somewhere that Christain Martyrs made the sign of the cross as they were about to die. The bravery of those that signed vs those that didn’t was a powerfull tool of conversion. Every time I make the sign I feel a powerfull communion with those martyrs. The next time you make the sign of cross meditate on our departed brothers.


#8

Anyone who thinks that making the sign of the cross is satanic is an ignorant fool. It is a very reverent way to showing the world, and yourself, that you belong to Christ. At least that’s what I think, although I am the only one in my family who doesn’t sign himself.


#9

So if you think that, why don’t you sign yourself?
:confused:


#10

I was raised Methodist and it just wasn’t something that we did. (Although I’m sure that some Methodists probably do).


#11

You can’t be a Catholic anymore. :slight_smile: jk


#12

Yep, turn in your Catholic Card…:slight_smile:

No, it doesn’t make it invalid. Don’t worry about it, the meaning counts not if you are exact in your movements.
It is a witness to your faith in God.

God Bless
Scylla


#13

I saw you changed your signature, so what are you thinking of joining?
I know the Episcopal Church has many problems, but now that you are ex… what are you thinking of doing.
(if you don’t mind me asking, and if you don’t know yet just brush me off) I don’t mind, I am thick skinned.

God Bless
Scylla


#14

I see a lot of Athletes sign themselves. I wonder are they all catholics, or do Protestants also sign themselves?


#15

I just recently finished reading this book:

The Sign of the Cross
By: Bert Ghezzi
Loyola Press / 2006 / Paperback

It was fantastic! It gave me a great appreciation for this ancient Christian tradition and the various meanings (some obvious, some subtle, all thoroughly Christian :getholy: ) behind the gesture.

This book was small and easy to read and very informative. It has made me thoughtfully reverent and very purposeful when making the Sign of the Cross. I sorrowfully admit I don’t use this spiritual tool as often as I should. :frowning: I am new to the Catholic faith and it has been a slow adjustment for me trying to learn and practice all things in the Catholic tradition! I believe it will take me the rest of my life!


#16

I challenged my reformed Calvinist apologetics teacher with the question, “Why do [most] Protestants not make the Sign of the Cross? It’s an ancient symbol of faith in Christ that the earliest Fathers verify?” His response was basically that “it is considered ‘Catholic,’ so Protestants don’t do it.” My response was (rather passionately): “So because it’s Catholic, it shouldn’t be done - because the Orthodox do it too.” His answer remained pretty much the same except that he added that many probably make it into a meaningless ritual after much use. However, if a Protestant makes the Sign, there is nothing wrong with it:rolleyes: . I know in one Lutheran handbook, I read that the Sign of the Cross is a great devotional ritual. It showed a diagram of how to make the Sign. I am also sure my Anglo-Catholic English teacher makes the Sign as well as do some other parishioners in liturgical churches:) .

Prayers and petitions,
Alexius:cool:


#17

I actually left the Episcopal Church about a year ago, a process that in some part was responsible for my coming to these forums when looking for a new home. We are currently attending a Lutheran Church (LCMS) but have not joined yet because of various doctrinal differences.

BTW, my original signature was “Refugee from the Episcopal Church”, I later changed it simply to Protestant, but my outlook is still Anglican in nature so I thought I’d change it again to the current signature. I think it is worthwhile when reading posts to have some idea as to where people are coming from.


#18

It seems a dangerous practice to me for Protestants to choose not to do something just because Catholics do it. For instance, Catholics call Jesus Christ Lord. Should Protestants call Him something else as a result?


#19

I would think that in their view is that it can become just a superstitious act.


#20

I go to a Protestant university, many do not understand the necessity of signing. And you would be amazed about how much they still do not know about Catholicism. Almost every day there is someone in my dorm room or in the caf talking with myself or the few other Catholics there about doctrine.
And as for the above comments the Orthodox do cross themselves but they go top, bottom, right left. One of my friends who is Orthodox told me it is because when the sheep and the goats are split the sheep to go the right and the goats go to the left so the right is holier, something like that.

And many traditional Lutherans sign themselves but with the contemporary movement moving through the Protestant churches many of the younger folks do not sign. I hope I was of at least a little help.
God bless,
Tyler


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