Sign of the Cross


#1

Do any other Christian denominations besides Roman Catholicism do the sign of the cross? What about Eastern Orthodox?


#2

Some Anglicans, Episcopalians and a small number of Lutherans do this. Basically, any liturgically oriented tradition might have this. It is probably not very widespread and is done more as a personal thing.

Scott


#3

At my old Lutheran church, at the end of the service the Pastor would say, “I absolve you” and all that jazz, and then do the sign of the cross with the Trinitarian formula. Aside from that, I don’t remember it being practiced.
Luther’s Small Catechism frequently refers you to make the sign of the cross before saying prayers and stuff(for lack of a better phrase).
Debo has left the thread.


#4

In the Eastern Churches, well at least the Byzantine and Orthodox, we use the sign of the cross. We are very attentive to the way the sign is made. To start with we cross to the right shoulder first because Christ sits at the right hand of the Father, then to the left shoulder. The placement of the fingers is very deliberate. We hold the thumb and the two fingers next to it, thouching - this repersents the three persons of the Trinity sharing a single essence. Then the other two fingers are tucked in representing the two natures of Christ, human and divine. Here is an illustration melkite.net/Resources/DailyPrayers.html


#5

[quote=JMJ_Pinoy]Do any other Christian denominations besides Roman Catholicism do the sign of the cross? What about Eastern Orthodox?
[/quote]

Eastern Orthodox cross themselves from right to left
Catholics cross themselves left to right


#6

[quote=Pani Rose]In the Eastern Churches, well at least the Byzantine and Orthodox, we use the sign of the cross. We are very attentive to the way the sign is made. To start with we cross to the right shoulder first because Christ sits at the right hand of the Father, then to the left shoulder. The placement of the fingers is very deliberate. We hold the thumb and the two fingers next to it, thouching - this repersents the three persons of the Trinity sharing a single essence. Then the other two fingers are tucked in representing the two natures of Christ, human and divine. Here is an illustration melkite.net/Resources/DailyPrayers.html
[/quote]

I’m sorry, you beat me to it. nice description:D


#7

[quote=Bulldog]Eastern Orthodox cross themselves from right to left
Catholics cross themselves left to right
[/quote]

Bulldog,

Latin Catholics cross themselves left to right. Eastern Catholics cross themselves right to left, as do their Orthodox brothers and sisters.

Many years,

Neil


#8

Dear Neil:

IIRC, in our previous discussions (at byzcath), certain Eastern Catholics also crossed themselves from left to right like the Latins do!

I think BOTH the Oriental Orthodox and Oriental Catholics (Copts, Armenians, Ethiopians/Eritreans, Syro-Malabars, Syro-Malankars, etc.) cross themselves from left to right.

And, of course, the Maronites!


#9

A wonderful description of crossing right to left. That leaves me with a question though. Why do we in the western church cross ourselves left to right?


#10

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