Similar to a thread I started a little bit ago

A little while ago I started this thread. The current thread is similar, and I’m trying to find out what the following means along with its implications:

Hence it is can no longer simply be said that all those in any “irregular” situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace. More is involved here than mere ignorance of the rule. A subject may know full well the rule, yet have great difficulty in understanding “its inherent values”

That is from Amoris Laetitia 301, which is just piggybacking off of an encyclical by St. John Paul II. Here’s the relevant part from Familiaris Consortio 33:

As Mother, the Church is close to the many married couples who find themselves in difficulty over this important point of the moral life: she knows well their situation, which is often very arduous and at times truly tormented by difficulties of every kind, not only individual difficulties but social ones as well; she knows that many couples encounter difficulties not only in the concrete fulfillment of the moral norm but even in understanding its inherent values.

So, what does this mean in practice and what are the implications? Is the situation I gave in the previous thread relevant to understanding a moral norm’s “inherent values”? Hopefully someone intelligent in matters related to the Church will be able to help!

Please discuss! :slight_smile:

Ask 3 bishops about that chapter of Amoris Laetitia, you will get 5 opinions. It was wildly ambiguous… probably intentionally.

I love our Holy Father. But this exhortation was seriously flawed, mainly in chapter 8. I would not worry much about what it means - the document has no legal force nor does it overrule the constant discipline of the Church on these matters. Nothing is new.

Anyway, the “inherent values” phraseology seems to be pointing at the understanding of the significance of a rule rather than its mere existence. It would be related to the “full/sufficient knowledge” part of an act that might be a mortal sin. “I know it’s wrong to steal. I have no idea why, I was just told not to do it.” See the problem? But then again, there’s that famous passage from Romans 1… Maybe we shouldn’t be so quick to think people don’t understand the significance of their actions, especially in these “natural” things like marriage and family. That’s what St. Paul seems to suggest.

There’s a plethora of opinion pieces out there now about AL. You could read them if you want more meat. But again, the document gives us no changes to law nor could it overrule the orthopraxis of our Faith, though it certainly seems close to doing so. Soon enough it will fade into the annals of history and be all but forgotten except by academics. Can you name any bulls that Pope Pius IV wrote? Neither can I.

There are certainly some new things and I personally find the Exhortation very good, not seriously flawed.

Anyway, the “inherent values” phraseology seems to be pointing at the understanding of the significance of a rule rather than its mere existence. It would be related to the “full/sufficient knowledge” part of an act that might be a mortal sin. “I know it’s wrong to steal. I have no idea why, I was just told not to do it.” See the problem? But then again, there’s that famous passage from Romans 1… Maybe we shouldn’t be so quick to think people don’t understand the significance of their actions, especially in these “natural” things like marriage and family. That’s what St. Paul seems to suggest.

There’s a plethora of opinion pieces out there now about AL. You could read them if you want more meat. But again, the document gives us no changes to law nor could it overrule the orthopraxis of our Faith, though it certainly seems close to doing so. Soon enough it will fade into the annals of history and be all but forgotten except by academics. Can you name any bulls that Pope Pius IV wrote? Neither can I.

Thanks for giving a response :slight_smile:

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