sin and ethics


#1

The church teaches about virtues and virtue ethics began with Aristotle. So no wonder the church puts so much credence in virtues. Sin as taught by Theologica Germanica is simple the moving away from the unchanging to the changing. So I guess the catechism would be our early start in knowing what sin is and isn’t. My purpose here is to begin a philosophical discussion of ethics Aristotlian and other wise. Plato and Aristotle both believeed in the world of forms and all forms came from an unmoved mover. So what other ethics could and should be employed here in our salvation other than virtue ethics?


#2

[quote="billcu1, post:1, topic:309408"]
The church teaches about virtues and virtue ethics began with Aristotle. So no wonder the church puts so much credence in virtues. Sin as taught by Theologica Germanica is simple the moving away from the unchanging to the changing. So I guess the catechism would be our early start in knowing what sin is and isn't. My purpose here is to begin a philosophical discussion of ethics Aristotlian and other wise. Plato and Aristotle both believeed in the world of forms and all forms came from an unmoved mover. So what other ethics could and should be employed here in our salvation other than virtue ethics?

[/quote]

My humble observation is that "virtues" date back further than Aristotle--back to the beginning of human history. However, while I know that the concepts of forms and an unmoved mover appear in the teachings of the Catholic Church, I really cannot address Plato and Aristotle on these concepts and neither "virtue ethics". I do look forward to this thread...especially since the* Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition *is a reference.


#3

[quote="billcu1, post:1, topic:309408"]
The church teaches about virtues and virtue ethics began with Aristotle. So no wonder the church puts so much credence in virtues. Sin as taught by Theologica Germanica is simple the moving away from the unchanging to the changing. So I guess the catechism would be our early start in knowing what sin is and isn't. My purpose here is to begin a philosophical discussion of ethics Aristotlian and other wise. Plato and Aristotle both believeed in the world of forms and all forms came from an unmoved mover. So what other ethics could and should be employed here in our salvation other than virtue ethics?

[/quote]

Your question is too broad, what are you aiming at? The ethics studied most widely among Catholic students is " Right and Reason " by Austin Fagothy, now in its 9th edition. Quite pricey but you can get earlier editions at very reasonable prices. This ethics text is based on natural law as taught by Thomas Aquinas, which, in turn, uses much of the Aristotlean reasoning as found in Nichomachean Ethics ( a surprisingly easy read). Ethics as such does not deal with sin. It deals with human action as it relates to reasonably good and bad behavior. That is behavior which is proper to our human nature. To live properly as human beings we are to use our intelligence to " do good and avoid evil. " By doing so we discover the behavior proper to a human being as far as reason can direct us.

I have never heard the term " virtue ethics. " It is bad form to introduce terms in a philosophical discussion which is not in normal use in the science because it just creats confusion.


#4

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtue_ethics


#5

[quote="billcu1, post:4, topic:309408"]
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtue_ethics

[/quote]

As far as pure ethics is concerned then read Right and Reason. As far as sin and behavior is concerned follow the Catechism. :thumbsup:


closed #6

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