Singing the words of consecration..


#1

is it okay if the words of consecration is sung (…take this all of you and eat it…)?


#2

I believe it is. I had a friend who saw an archabbot chant the words of consecration at a Benedictine abbey. If done respectfully I think it is alright. Can anyone confirm this?

matt


#3

I can confirm that, from seeing it in the books, that the current Eucharistic Prayer(s) do have settings for chant.

Of course, in the Tridentine Rite the Canon is prayerd silently. However, at Clear Creek monastery, which celebrates a “Benedictinized” version of the Tridentine Mass, provision is made in their rubrics for regular concelebrated Liturgies, at which the different parts of the Canon are chanted alternately by several priests.

The Clear Creek monks haven’t quite mastered it yet, and I was not too impressed with it; however, I’m told that it’s quite beautiful when done correctly.

At Saint John Cantius in Chicago, parts of the Canon are also sometimes chanted in Latin.

So yes, the rubrics do allow for it.


#4

Yes it most definetly is okay to sing, not just the words of consecration, but the whole Eucharistic prayer, and is very proper and appropriate to do so.

I answered this in another thread, with support from the catechism, unfortuatly I do not have the catachism handy right now; just one caution - NO MUSIC IS TO BE PLAYED DURING THE EUCHARISTIC PRAYER - EXCEPT FOR THE PROCLAMATION OF THE MYSTRY OF FAITH “Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again” (and it’s variations)

.


#5

Actually, the entire Mass is (appropriately) intended to be sung. I have heard that it is only by indult that it is not.


#6

singing with instrument? like guitar or organ? is it okay?


#7

[quote=chicago]Actually, the entire Mass is (appropriately) intended to be sung. I have heard that it is only by indult that it is not.
[/quote]

You’re mostly right. Certain parts are never sung, like the Orate Fratres and the Ecce Agnus Dei.

I don’t know if “indult” is the right word . . .

singing with instrument? like guitar or organ? is it okay?

The rubrcis say specifically that instrumental music may not be played during the Eucharistic Prayer (Memorial Acclamation and Great Amen excepted).

I’m almost certain it is allowed, however, for someone to use the organ or other suitable instrument to give the celebrant the desired pitch before he sings. He might, via the organ, give the pitch at different intervals to aid each of the concelebrants, or else if there is a great change in pitch with which the celebrant might need some help to acclimate himself.

I make this observation based on the fact that the Church allows the organ to be played in this manner during Advent and Lent, when the use of the organ and other instruments is otherwise forbidden or discouraged. I assume the same principle applies here.


#8

The 2002 edition of the Missale Romanum does provide that even the Orate, fratres and the Ecce, Agnus Dei may be sung.


#9

[quote=Chatter163]The 2002 edition of the Missale Romanum does provide that even the Orate, fratres and the Ecce, Agnus Dei may be sung.
[/quote]

Really?!?!?!?!

Wow . . .

:eek:

I believe you, but do you now of any online documentation in this regard?

Wow . . .

Learn something new every day!


#10

[quote=Chatter163]The 2002 edition of the Missale Romanum does provide that even the Orate, fratres and the Ecce, Agnus Dei may be sung.
[/quote]

This is not entirely correct. In the 2002 GIRM there are numerous references to singing.

For example, paragraphs 40, 81, 83, and 365a. The last of these is in regard to the Eucharistic Prayer.


#11

At our Easter Vigil Mass this year, the priest sang the words of the Consecration… in Aramaic! It was sooo beautiful to hear those sacred words in the language that Jesus spoke.BlueRose


#12

[quote=Sacramentalist]Really?!?!?!?!

Wow . . .

:eek:

I believe you, but do you now of any online documentation in this regard?

Wow . . .

Learn something new every day!
[/quote]

canticanova.com/catalog/products/cd-orate.htm


#13

[quote=msproule]This is not entirely correct. In the 2002 GIRM there are numerous references to singing.

For example, paragraphs 40, 81, 83, and 365a. The last of these is in regard to the Eucharistic Prayer.
[/quote]

My apologies Chatter163! I must have read your post (#8) too quickly the first time. I thought I read “does not provide…”.

Oops!:o


#14

Why is it that sometimes the priest will sing and sometimes not? I go to daily Mass and I havent found a pattern to it. Depends on how he feels that day?


#15

Daily mass is a low mass and it is ok for a priest to recite evrything. Just my opinion


#16

[quote=bluerose]At our Easter Vigil Mass this year, the priest sang the words of the Consecration… in Aramaic! It was sooo beautiful to hear those sacred words in the language that Jesus spoke.BlueRose
[/quote]

In a Roman Catholic Church? If so, I don’t think this is allowed. I’ve never heard of any approved Aramaic texts or translations for use in the Roman rite… as touching and creative as they may be (or NOT!), when will liturgical abuses come to an end? DO WHAT THE RED SAYS! It’s easy folks!

To my knowledge Aramaic is the ancient liturgical language of the Maronite and other Eastern rite Catholic and Orthodox Churches…but definitely not in the Roman rite.


#17

[quote=viktor aleksndr]singing with instrument? like guitar or organ? is it okay?
[/quote]

Hi, just trying to figure how to work this thing.

I am so glad to discover this site full of tradtional Catholics, how sad that I have to make that distinction.

Peace and all good,

Mike


#18

[quote=Sacramentalist]I can confirm that, from seeing it in the books, that the current Eucharistic Prayer(s) do have settings for chant.

Of course, in the Tridentine Rite the Canon is prayerd silently. However, at Clear Creek monastery, which celebrates a “Benedictinized” version of the Tridentine Mass, provision is made in their rubrics for regular concelebrated Liturgies, at which the different parts of the Canon are chanted alternately by several priests.

The Clear Creek monks haven’t quite mastered it yet, and I was not too impressed with it; however, I’m told that it’s quite beautiful when done correctly.

At Saint John Cantius in Chicago, parts of the Canon are also sometimes chanted in Latin.

So yes, the rubrics do allow for it.
[/quote]

The Mass where parts of the Canon are chanted at St. John Cantius is the 11:00 Latin Novus Ordo Mass. I’ve gone to Tridentine Masses at St. John Cantius for 13 years and I’ve never heard the Canon chanted at a Tridentine Mass.


#19

[quote=EJ79]In a Roman Catholic Church? If so, I don’t think this is allowed. I’ve never heard of any approved Aramaic texts or translations for use in the Roman rite… as touching and creative as they may be (or NOT!), when will liturgical abuses come to an end? DO WHAT THE RED SAYS! It’s easy folks!

To my knowledge Aramaic is the ancient liturgical language of the Maronite and other Eastern rite Catholic and Orthodox Churches…but definitely not in the Roman rite.
[/quote]

The Latin Rite Mass can be said in any language for pastoral reasons, provided that there is a translation of the Roman Missal approved by the Holy See and the local ordinary has approved the use of the language in his diocese/community. The only language a local ordinary can NEVER ban the use of is Latin. Any priest can say Mass in Latin at any time.

Obedient to Rome,

Adam


#20

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